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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterlily View Post
    Also working parents DO get preference over non workings on waiting lists.
    That may be so, but what about the kids of sahm that are already in care? They are taking positions that may be desperately needed by those that need to return to work (and may not have a choice in having to return to work!).

  2. #82
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    As others have mentioned, my biggest concern with this proposal is those on maternity leave etc. It's also extremely problematic for casual workers.

    I've just gone on leave, but previously I was working casually. I'd work anywhere from 6 to 42 hours per week. DD would go to childcare from 4 hours to 2.5 days per week, depending on when I was working. DP would have her at other times. Even if I only had one evening shift during the week, I'd still send DD for at least a morning during the week so that she's familiar with the place and doesn't freak out having not been for a few weeks. Same thing currently... I'm on maternity leave, but I'm still sending her for 1/2 to 1.5 days per week (our centre has very low utilisation, so we can just book her in the day before). I intend to do this for the entire time that I'm on leave, which could be a year.

    Technically though, once the government PPL runs out, I won't be on maternity leave. I work casually, and had only worked for my employer for about 8 months, so I'm not even entitled to unpaid leave...they've just chosen to put me "on hold". That means even if there were an exception for leave, I can't see that I'd count.

    I'm rambling a little by this point, but how about SAHPs who have no support and are single parents, or have FIFO partners, or have partners like mine who work seriously ridiculous hours? If my partner's working hours were split between the two of us, then he'd be considered working full time and I'd be part time. I still have to do extra "work" by caring for our children while he's working, but because he's the one who'll get paid and I won't, we wouldn't be entitled to any support?

    Ahh I dunno... I don't like it. I understand what they're trying to get at, but I think "SAHPs shouldn't use childcare" is too simplistic. Honestly, if someone stays at home and wants someone else to look after their child full time (not something that I think would be common, but seemingly the way that they can spin the moralising on this one), then I think it's better that the child be in care than with the parent!

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  4. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicmama View Post
    Many young mums that I know have used childcare since their child was 1ish, generally 1 or 2 days a week, but I don't know any older sahms that do.

    I don't like aiming things specifically at young mums, considering I'm one too, but it's something that I've noticed.
    Ive never had DD in childcare and (hows this for a cross over on 2 threads lol) have been criticized by other young mums for not putting her in daycare in the first few weeks. Ive just never had the need. But i would love a few hours to myself sometimes so I can see where they are coming from but I assume that would be the same with any mum lol. As DD gets older I'm slowely increasing my client list and when she of age I'm planning on putting her in kindy/preschool and either working full time from home or looking for work in an accounting firm. The demand for my work doesn't seem very high here though so I'm worried about the costs of retraining in a new field combined with preschool costs.

    On a side note - thankyou everyone who contributed because my earlier post was misinformed and I've somewhat changed my opinion on the matter now.

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  6. #84
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    My friend pays $650 a week in childcare after CCB and CCR.

    I want to see this ^^ change.

    CCB and CCR should not be based on the combined household income, but on the lowest income the household is receiving.

    I have way too many friends not working because their husband has a decent income and it means that they'd be working for nothing after childcare is paid.

    As a result we have women being out of the workforce long term and not having financial independence should they ever need it.

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  8. #85
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    I'd be screwed. Sometimes things don't turn out like you planned. I had my first and we decided I would be a sahm and I never planned on using childcare, didn't need it etc etc.

    Coming up to two and half and he had speech delays and development delays and I wasn't socialising as much as I thought I would, was advised by numerous people to put him in daycare to help. Also had number two.

    Number three comes along at same time as my first is diagnosed with asd. Develop severe pnd, hospitalised. So my first is now enrolled in preschool two days a week, my second in childcare two days a week and I'm still struggling to function. I never believed in using childcare unless you were working. I come from view now that even just one day can make a difference for struggling mums. Are we really going to punish the many who need this help because of the few who take advantage? Ccb is only applied to two days and only takes a percentage off. It's not like it's cheap or free for sahm as it is.

    I can't go to playgroups my asd child doesn't cope well in those situations. I rarely make it out the house.

    Childcare days means I can take my first to therapy, attend numerous appts for myself.

    Sent from my D5503 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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  10. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdornedWithCats View Post
    I know no one like this irl out of my mothers group and other mummy friends, they only use cc for work or study purposes and even then, as a last resort after getting family members to help. I do have a friend who may appear to be a sahm but she actually runs a business from home and is trying to find a cc place 1-2 days a week so she can run her business.

    As for using community preschools rather than cc for kindy/preschool, it really relies on availability. If all the preschools are full then you will have to use cc or miss out completely. The centres in my area are completely full. I've heard you need to put for bub on waitlist by 2 years for 4 year old kinder at the local preschool.

    That's OK, I was trying to think of a SAHM who doesn't use CC and I could only think of one or two. Obviously everyone has a different experience.

  11. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by lolz83 View Post
    That may be so, but what about the kids of sahm that are already in care? They are taking positions that may be desperately needed by those that need to return to work (and may not have a choice in having to return to work!).
    I was a SAHM and needed my children to go into daycare because of pnd and anxiety. We all have our battles and need daycare for different reasons...

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  13. #88
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    Default No more subsidised childcare for non-working parents?

    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    I sent my DD to childcare 1 day a week from when she was 13 months old and I for all intents and purposes I was a SAHM.

    I don't have a village, there's just me, DH, DS and DD. We have no extended family. Sending DD to child care 1 day a week meant that DD and DS would have an overlap year together at child care (DS was doing his Kindy year there). To have one day a week where I could do house work, house maintenance, run errands, make phone calls etc made me able to be a better mother the other 6 days of the week. I spent a lot of those days doing up part of our very dilapidated house into a playroom for the .
    That's all very well and good but is it really a good use of government spending to subsidise your child care so you can do up your kids playroom?

    Government spending has to be targeted at increasing workplace participation and for supporting people who can't work or need a short term lift. For everything else you need to own your choices.

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  15. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoteToSelf View Post
    That's all very well and good but is it really a good use of government spending to subsidise your child care so you can do up your kids playroom?

    Government spending has to be targeted at increasing workplace participation and for supporting people who can't work or need a short term lift. For everything else you need to own your choices.
    EVERYTHING is a choice. I think deciding to work is possibly classed as a choice as well. It wasn't a matter of deciding to be a SAHM for me when my kids were little but that I was unable to work at the time because I was unwell. As I said before..... we all have our own battles and use daycare for different reasons. Its all relative.. and its not up to anyone else to decide whose reasons are good enough.
    Last edited by RipperRita; 02-05-2015 at 13:12.

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  17. #90
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    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
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    Default No more subsidised childcare for non-working parents?

    Some people consider certain university degrees to be follies and self-indulgent luxuries. Some people look at certain careers the same way, that they don't contribute to society in a meaningful way. Should these people be less entitled to HECS/HELP/Austudy/CCR?

    We are all to a certain extent dependent on government money in our lives, and I don't think SAHMs need to justify any one of a myriad of reasons why they might choose to access CC.

    That mum who uses half a day to coffee with friends and watch Dr Phil may be on the edge of a breakdown and this contact with reality keeps her going for the rest of the week. Or someone might be suffering from PTSD after a traumatic incident and it's not appropriate to drag her toddler along to her psychologist's appointment. We just don't know. Even when we think we know everything about a friend we just might not.

    It's not up to anyone to judge.

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