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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    I have also seen the research and do agree that many many studies over many years have shown that TV CAN have negative links, especially with speech and language. However, i do reiterate that SOME tv as a part of a balanced lifestyle is ok. I use rv - not for my kids benefit, but my own - its my break time. Eg, this morning, we had brekkie, did playdough, baked cookies tigether, read stories and played outside. Then the older two had 20mins of tv while thw baby slept & i had a coffee. It was nice down time for all of us.

    The studies I linked are for kids under 2. TV for under two year olds is detrimental, but research shows viewing sesame street between ages 3-5 for less than 2 hours per day is associated with language benefits all the way into adolescence (happy to post links). Paeds agree that Educational shows and slow-paced cartoons in small amounts is a great tool for preschoolers. Violence/fast-paced Cartoons/background TV is bad for preschoolers.

    So yeah, I agree with you. everything in balance, select content carefully, and try to avoid TV for infants. It's not really that radical.

  2. #42
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    *my kid watches too much telly* I just want to be clear on that because I'm finding some of the responses to the research @Lilaah is posting a bit on the defensive side. I accept the research - it's there and it's substantive, I don't feel ruled or judged by it though.

    The outcome is not causal by any means but it doesn't mean it's unworthy of consideration.

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  4. #43
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    Default 16 month old obsessed with watching TV!! Help!!

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    Last edited by lilypily; 24-04-2015 at 20:49.

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  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    It's an issue that plagues all areas of human research, there are a lot of ways researchers minimise the effect of liars to negligible levels.
    - they take big samples, because lots of people don't lie
    - they devise measures that have cheat detectors built into certain questions
    - they have complex statistical thingys that can detect deception
    - if researchers anticipate high levels of bs, they don't tell you the true purpose of the study
    - they make recommendations, such as the no TV for under 2 year olds, based dozens of high quality studies testing thousands and thousands of different kids

    If you do all this, you negate the effect of lying, which really doesn't happen that much anyway.

    in answer to the first question, these are studies that have already taken out the effect of parenting, income, education, parental IQ, preterm birth, breastfeeding, etcetera all the things that can affect language, cognition and behaviour. Researchers measure as many things as they can to allow them to isolate what effect TV has.

    guidelines are developed off of many, high quality research studies. This isn't something some wacky Amish paediatrician has just tossed out. It's the consensus of the paediatric academy, based off very strong evidence.
    Ok, not lie, but make it up. "Based on their recall". Come on.

    Nope, sorry, too much maybe and not enough fact.

    BTW I'm not saying tv is good for kids. But 30 mins a day isn't going to make as much of a difference as not doing educational stuff would (singing ABCs counting etc).

  7. #45
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    The conclusions of the first review article say that tv has the potential to cause harm, not that it does. And if you read through it, it says any language delay before 16 months seems to be transitory as there is no delay in older age groups. They also point out that maybe parents are responding to their childs language delay by increasing tv/dvd viewing.

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    From the conclusion:
    The preponderance of existing evidence suggests the potential for harm. Parents should exercise due caution in exposing infants to excessive media.

    Potential for harm. Not that it does. But maybe.

    Also this from the second article:
    one study finds positive associations of language learning with exposure to some children’s TV programs

    ETA: snap @AdornedWithCats
    Last edited by DT75; 24-04-2015 at 20:58.

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  10. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Nette View Post
    Here is an interesting review of all the research

    http://www.parentingscience.com/effe...ng-speech.html

    Basically it is saying that kids have developmental delays associated with tv, because kids learn by actually interacting with people rather than watching.

    If you are having plenty of interaction with your child, I wouldn't worry too much about a bit of time in front of the tv while you get some things done.
    That's the thing I find ridiculous about other studies mentioned. They don't sufficiently take into account other key contributing factors to IQ/language delays etc... They don't sufficiently take into account what interaction goes in between a parent and child in the non TV time. If a parent spends a lot of time with their child reading, organising outings, doing puzzles, talking, singing etc... Then 30 minutes of carefully chosen programming could be more beneficial than letting that kid eat cat biscuits for the 30 minutes mum needs a break.

    Whereas a poor kid who has a bum of a parent who bums around all day smoking a pack of ciggies in their kids face, never reading, going on excursions, doing puzzles etc... Is probably not going to benefit much from watching 30 minutes or more of Spider-Man or that crap in the night garden.

    Unless the studies measure things like whether the mother smoked or drank while pregnant, breastmilk v formula, solid intake (feeding kids food in pouches supposedly delays speech as well)... Etc... Then for all we know the results could be indicative of another common contributor rather than TV.

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    Literally everything has potential to harm does it not?

    I believe all it takes is a bit of common sense and everyone can enjoy the wonderful invention that is tv.

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    *my kid watches too much telly* I just want to be clear on that because I'm finding some of the responses to the research @Lilaah is posting a bit on the defensive side. I accept the research - it's there and it's substantive, I don't feel ruled or judged by it though.

    The outcome is not causal by any means but it doesn't mean it's unworthy of consideration.
    Yep. I agree. I think some people are way too defensive. My kids watch too much tv. But they also go to the park way more than most of my friends' kids and plenty of other kids I know. We NEVER stay at home for the whole day. Ever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Yep. I agree. I think some people are way too defensive. My kids watch too much tv. But they also go to the park way more than most of my friends' kids and plenty of other kids I know. We NEVER stay at home for the whole day. Ever.
    Ours watch it at the weekend- max 2 hrs a day. That's it.

    So, can't see how I'm being defensive. Stating that "tv is bad for your kids and will cause XYZ" is awful. Yes, perhaps it has the potential to cause XYZ. That doesn't mean it will- which is the way Lilaah was posting.


 
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