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  1. #1
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    Default Is it worth seeing a paed?

    DS has always had trouble settling down and staying focused, not only at school but at home too. He needed a little extra help from a teachers aid settling into kindergarten because he would call out at inappropriate times with random things (which he still does very frequently, but it's better controlled in the classroom), get out of his seat when he was meant to be sitting and generally play the clown and the more the other kids laughed the more he did it. The last part continues to this day. To add to this, in the last couple of years he has started having pretty big angry outbursts that have occasionally resulted in him lashing out (when he was hit he hit back), throwing stuff in class (when he doesn't what to do certain activities) and throwing things at home (usually when he's frustrated with a game). He also talks non-stop, fidgets like nothing else, has a lot of trouble concentrating and constantly needs to be reminded to get back on task, has trouble finishing tasks that don't hold his interest, doesn't like to do anything that requires him to think too much, and gets extremely impatient when waiting in line or doing something he doesn't like.

    For those that don't know I'm studying to be a special ed teacher so I've been exposed to a lot of literature about ADD/ADHD and every time I read something it rings true to DS. There were hints at different times that he could be ADHD but we thought it was the disrupted life with moving and a few other things but it's become pretty clear that the traits are here to stay.

    He's now nearly 11 (12 days ) and some things we put in place in year 3 and 4 (he's now in year 6) have seen his school work and behaviour improve dramatically, we know there are certain foods that set him off and we've generally dealt with things in a manner that sees him being a pretty well behaved kid. We know that we're able to help him with strategies and coping mechanisms so the chances of us considering medicating him are next to none. At this stage I honestly have no idea whether it will be worth talking to a paed and whether it would make much difference to anything if he was diagnosed. Has anyone else dealt with anything similar or have any ideas about what I should be doing? I'm feeling a bit lost and a bit peeved at myself that I didn't put 2 and 2 together earlier.

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    Well from everything you've written that sounds exactly two students I have had, one was diagnosed with ADHD and one was diagnosed on the spectrum.

    I seem to remember your son is quite intelligent? Is it possible he is not being extended enough in class?

    I don't know the answer to what you're asking specifically except to say that a formal diagnosis can help with funding for future school support ie possible one to one behavioural support in class, or perhaps extra time on exams (or facilities maybe for him to go for a quick walk every 15 minutes or something). So that would be a reason that I would recommended seeing a paediatrician.

    Other than that you sound extremely caring and close to your son - you know how to help him and are willing to put the time into that. So...can you accept him as your quirky DS, or do you feel more comfortable with more direction to help you learn how to help him?

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    Yes it is worth seeing a pead.
    Please don't the discount medication before you even really looked into it.

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    If you send him to a paediatrician he/she will assess him very quickly then put him on medication. It's all they know. They did that to my daughter. I would first suggest you go to a dietitian as they may know what foods trigger ADHD. They will suggest eliminating certain foods from his diet to work out the trigger. It might be something as simple as wheat based foods, red cordial etc. that is affecting your son. Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopefulmum2 View Post
    If you send him to a paediatrician he/she will assess him very quickly then put him on medication. It's all they know. They did that to my daughter. I would first suggest you go to a dietitian as they may know what foods trigger ADHD. They will suggest eliminating certain foods from his diet to work out the trigger. It might be something as simple as wheat based foods, red cordial etc. that is affecting your son. Good luck.
    This not my experience at all.
    I have 3 kids go through the process. Only 1 is medicated it been a massive help to him and there is no way he would be doing good so well at school as he is now. 1 had 4 years of 1 or 2 times a week therapy. The other is just at the beginning and there has been no talk of medication as yet.

    Oh and it not a quick process either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    Well from everything you've written that sounds exactly two students I have had, one was diagnosed with ADHD and one was diagnosed on the spectrum.

    I seem to remember your son is quite intelligent? Is it possible he is not being extended enough in class?

    I don't know the answer to what you're asking specifically except to say that a formal diagnosis can help with funding for future school support ie possible one to one behavioural support in class, or perhaps extra time on exams (or facilities maybe for him to go for a quick walk every 15 minutes or something). So that would be a reason that I would recommended seeing a paediatrician.

    Other than that you sound extremely caring and close to your son - you know how to help him and are willing to put the time into that. So...can you accept him as your quirky DS, or do you feel more comfortable with more direction to help you learn how to help him?
    If something draws in his attention he becomes fixated on it and absorbs all the information really well. Things like maths and literacy don't keep his attention so he's a little behind par there. He has become fascinated by so pretty random things, including quantum physics at one stage

    I'm pretty confident that the way we have been helping him has been right for him but if there was more to help then I would certainly like the guidance with it. I love him to bits with all his quirks and perks
    @LoveLivesHere The reason I said it's highly unlikely we'd medicate is because he's come so far with the things we've put in place. It's hard to put into words what I'm trying to say here but he seems to be on par with other ADHD kids I've known who were medicated so I'm not sure that it would make much difference for him at this stage. I'm aware there are variances in the effects of it too so I'm not discounting that.
    @Hopefulmumof2 We're pretty strict with his diet as is and know what foods make him worse so avoid them like the plague! I was hoping by seeing a paed they would be able to offer different ways of dealing with things or further referrals to other specialists instead of just medicating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveLivesHere View Post
    This not my experience at all.
    I have 3 kids go through the process. Only 1 is medicated it been a massive help to him and there is no way he would be doing good so well at school as he is now. 1 had 4 years of 1 or 2 times a week therapy. The other is just at the beginning and there has been no talk of medication as yet.

    Oh and it not a quick process either.
    That gives me more hope. I fully expect for it to be a pretty extensive process.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveLivesHere View Post
    This not my experience at all.
    I have 3 kids go through the process. Only 1 is medicated it been a massive help to him and there is no way he would be doing good so well at school as he is now. 1 had 4 years of 1 or 2 times a week therapy. The other is just at the beginning and there has been no talk of medication as yet.

    Oh and it not a quick process either.
    All I can say is that was my experience with a paediatrician and this person came highly recommended. People have to understand that medications come with side affects. My daughter was so depressed when she was on them it scared me. Yes medication might be helpful. I was only suggesting Chunkydunks first see if food might be the problem before she goes down the road of medication.

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    Yes it sounds like a good idea!!

    If he's a good gp he won't diagnose TBH He will refer you onto a psychologist (behavioural) things like that. (Your studying same degree as me!)

    I would also be wondering if he is bored. Does he do anything out of school?

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    Thanks. I think I've finally got DH listening to my concerns too. He's quite worried about it just being a label that's going to make DS's life a bit harder but I don't see it like that. If there is something in it that could potentially help DS then it should be worth looking into.


 

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