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  1. #21
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    DD knew at 2. She knew to always ask me before she could eat anything, she would ask "does this have cows milk or eggs?"

    I drummed it into her from day 1, I always said things like "no that has eggs, you will get very sick and go to hospital if you eat that" about the cake she was eyeing.

    Constant repetition worked for us. To this day she never wats anything from anyone without asking me first.

    I got big stickers made for her lunch box that said "egg and dairy allergy" so it was always fresh in her teachers mind.

    She was always watched by a teacher when eating lunch and recess and the class was always told they are not to share their food especially with my DD"

    Last year she was the only allergy kid in her class this year there is any other dairy allergy girl.

    I have taken her own butter, milk, chocolates and cupcakes to the school so she doesn't have to miss out when something unexpected pop up.
    Last edited by waterlily; 21-04-2015 at 13:00.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I heard this little snippet from my last first aid training. It's actually true ������

    There was a teacher (don't know if it's the same case you've read about) who failed to administer it properly, and in the court case she said she hadn't been trained correctly in the first aid so she wasn't responsible.

    Originally the first aid training had us practise administering the epipen into our own thighs, so she did exactly the same thing with a student in anaphylactic shock - administered the epipen into her own thigh. I think they assumed we would realise it would only work if you gave it to the person who needed it!

    Since then the training has been upgraded so that we practise administering it to someone else so there is no confusion whatsoever ���������������� �
    If it's the same case, it was a little boy at a kindergarten in Melbourne. The kinder teacher did inject the epipen into herself. Lots of training and reform has happened since this awful event.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    Ah ok, I thought you meant they don't even ban them at all. So they do request not to bring them but can't guarantee it? That makes sense.
    exactly. we are constantly reminded not to take nuts but the school will not tell a parent it is a nutfree school.

    As a side issue a school Mum friend was telling me about the yummy batch of muffins she made for her son for school lunches and the first and main ingredient was nutella! I pointed out that they have nuts in them because of the nutella. She had not given it one thought. She honestly hadnt even thought about the fact that nutella contains nuts, yet she wouldnt pack almonds or walnuts etc in her sons lunch.

  4. #24
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    My Ds1 had various nut and egg allergy which he outgrew. But even at 3-4 years old he knew not to eat food given to him by another, and how to tell people that nuts and eggs made him sick. His daycare was brilliant, never had a problem with them. In my experience daycares are like tiny hermetically sealed bubbles!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by GirlsRock View Post
    exactly. we are constantly reminded not to take nuts but the school will not tell a parent it is a nutfree school.

    As a side issue a school Mum friend was telling me about the yummy batch of muffins she made for her son for school lunches and the first and main ingredient was nutella! I pointed out that they have nuts in them because of the nutella. She had not given it one thought. She honestly hadnt even thought about the fact that nutella contains nuts, yet she wouldnt pack almonds or walnuts etc in her sons lunch.
    I guess it's easy to be flippant if your kids don't have allergies, you don't know anyone with allergies and you're not working in a child focused industry.

    I should probably just be more worried about eating out. I ordered her a soy baby chino with no chocolate and got a regular milk one (good thing she's only intolerant and not allergic) another time I ordered a soy decaf late as DS is also dairy intolerant and I'm breast feeding and at another venue they got it wrong.

    I'd never take her to an Asian restaurant as they can use peanut and sesame oils but I don't trust communicating it with the restaurant due to language barriers. I just think some food places don't take it anywhere near serious enough.

  6. #26
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    We send dd with her own lunch to childcare etc

    Dd is allergic to sesame, soy sauce, salmon, and also dairy intolerant.

    I'm not fussed. Paed always tells us reintroduce food. I don't stress about it I teach her not to share not to be afraid of food instead.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    So DD is 3 and is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame and intolerant of dairy. I'm starting to stress about her starting childcare and school.

    Parents of kids with allergies, when did they start to really understand that there are foods that could kill them?

    Teachers, how do they handle allergy kids in schools? I know there's no peanuts allowed, but what about nuts and sesame? Surely those aren't banned too? So do all kids get taught what the symptoms are to look out for allergy kids having a reaction at lunchtime when a teacher isn't around? Are all teachers trained to know the signs and how to use an epipen? Do they put all the allergy kids together in the one class so only 1 teacher and 1 set of kids have to assist in ensuring allergy kids are kept safe?

    I'm starting to get very nervous!
    As a teacher, I can reassure you somewhat I hope schools generally ban peanuts, especially if there is an anaphylactic child in the school. In my own school (and this is common practice), yard duty teachers have photos of children with asthma and allergies in their yard duty bags, along with first aid procedure for that child. We have some anaphylactic children at our school, and their picture is up in every single classroom and work area in the school, along with their symptoms and medical care needed. We have each child's epipen, along with some spares, in the front office. One child who is severely allergic to many things, Including but not limited to everything you already mentioned, has a first aid kit in the classroom which contains their epipen and other medications. This kit goes with them everywhere they go, including out into the yard and given to a specific yard duty teacher, who is responsible for knowing where this child is at all times during recess and lunch breaks. This child also had their school hat brightly decorated in red puff paint so they could be easily recognised at a glance in the playground. The child's class teacher is well informed of their allergies, but still must run anything shared with the class (eg a birthday cake or class cooking lesson) past the mother, so she can double-check all ingredients and suggest alternatives if necessary. I hope this helps put your mind at ease. As the people responsible for caring for your children during the day, we do care about what happens to your child and do everything in our power to ensure their safety. Given your child's allergies, I highly doubt a principal would place them in a class with any teacher who was not extremely diligent in this.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by GirlsRock View Post
    exactly. we are constantly reminded not to take nuts but the school will not tell a parent it is a nutfree school.

    As a side issue a school Mum friend was telling me about the yummy batch of muffins she made for her son for school lunches and the first and main ingredient was nutella! I pointed out that they have nuts in them because of the nutella. She had not given it one thought. She honestly hadnt even thought about the fact that nutella contains nuts, yet she wouldnt pack almonds or walnuts etc in her sons lunch.
    My DD's childcare is completely nutfree - they are a kindy as well. all childcare meals are provided, but kindy children bring their own. Their lunchboxes are checked and parents notified if anything doesn't follow these guidelines.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    This is what I'm worried about too. DD being segregated from other kids. I like how a pp mentioned she splits the class in 2 so no one feels left out.

    Sesame is probably the hardest allergy as it's not as common yet there's sesame in sooooooo much!
    I doubt she'd be the only one, so it would be similar to two classes.
    And, if she was the only one...well it's not the other kids' faults.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jussi View Post
    My DD's childcare is completely nutfree - they are a kindy as well. all childcare meals are provided, but kindy children bring their own. Their lunchboxes are checked and parents notified if anything doesn't follow these guidelines.
    The school used to say it was nut free but when the Anaphalaxis Education person from the RCH attended the school for an Education Session she brought up the fact that an item could have been made using almond meal in place of flour, therefore it's not nut free. The RCH view was that there is no way of knowing exactly what is in a particular item, hence the school's policy to seek that parents don't send any nut products but not to promote the school as nut free so as not to mislead parents or give them a false sense of security.


 

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