+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2016 - Member you'd most like to meet
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    10,165
    Thanks
    6,409
    Thanked
    16,340
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 2/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 19/3/15Busiest Member of the Week200 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    Thanks everyone! I think it's just the unknown that scared me. When I was at school no one in my class ever had any food allergies. I also remember a story of a teacher who had administered the epi pen incorrectly and the child died. It has stuck in my memory ever since.
    I heard this little snippet from my last first aid training. It's actually true 😳

    There was a teacher (don't know if it's the same case you've read about) who failed to administer it properly, and in the court case she said she hadn't been trained correctly in the first aid so she wasn't responsible.

    Originally the first aid training had us practise administering the epipen into our own thighs, so she did exactly the same thing with a student in anaphylactic shock - administered the epipen into her own thigh. I think they assumed we would realise it would only work if you gave it to the person who needed it!

    Since then the training has been upgraded so that we practise administering it to someone else so there is no confusion whatsoever 😳😳😳

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8,351
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked
    4,888
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I heard this little snippet from my last first aid training. It's actually true 😳

    There was a teacher (don't know if it's the same case you've read about) who failed to administer it properly, and in the court case she said she hadn't been trained correctly in the first aid so she wasn't responsible.

    Originally the first aid training had us practise administering the epipen into our own thighs, so she did exactly the same thing with a student in anaphylactic shock - administered the epipen into her own thigh. I think they assumed we would realise it would only work if you gave it to the person who needed it!

    Since then the training has been upgraded so that we practise administering it to someone else so there is no confusion whatsoever 😳😳😳
    WT Actual F!!!? That's ridiculous! What a dumb ****! Did she actually give herself the epi pen. Fair enough she would have been stressed and running in adrenalin but come on! What ended up happening to her?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    1,554
    Thanks
    431
    Thanked
    755
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I heard this little snippet from my last first aid training. It's actually true 😳

    There was a teacher (don't know if it's the same case you've read about) who failed to administer it properly, and in the court case she said she hadn't been trained correctly in the first aid so she wasn't responsible.

    Originally the first aid training had us practise administering the epipen into our own thighs, so she did exactly the same thing with a student in anaphylactic shock - administered the epipen into her own thigh. I think they assumed we would realise it would only work if you gave it to the person who needed it!

    Since then the training has been upgraded so that we practise administering it to someone else so there is no confusion whatsoever 😳😳😳
    OMG that's insane. Did she seriously think the epipen was meant to go in her own leg?!

  4. #14
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2016 - Member you'd most like to meet
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    10,165
    Thanks
    6,409
    Thanked
    16,340
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 2/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 19/3/15Busiest Member of the Week200 Posts in a week
    Honestly I think she panicked and went into autopilot and didn't have the character to take responsibility for it. Or maybe that was St John's take, and she was actually perfectly reasonable in explaining what happened and making suggestions for the training to be improved? But it was certainly a wtf moment when I heard it!

    It highlighted how important it was for schools to have spare epipens and I think many policies were changed as a result.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to harvs For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (21-04-2015)

  6. #15
    SuperGranny's Avatar
    SuperGranny is offline Worlds best grandma! Winner 2012 - Most Helpful Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    sunshine coast qld
    Posts
    6,274
    Thanks
    4,706
    Thanked
    2,878
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    at my grandsons school. children with allergies ,have a white band on their school hat, so everyone in the playground can see this child has allergies. I don't know what the policy of 'nut free' is at his school. he has dairy and egg allergy. also in the staff room there is a photo board of all the children with their allergies and how they might react. it is taken very seriously, and every teacher is aware of the first aid, and also the admin staff. marie.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to SuperGranny For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (21-04-2015)

  8. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,971
    Thanks
    1,939
    Thanked
    1,493
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    So DD is 3 and is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame and intolerant of dairy. I'm starting to stress about her starting childcare and school.

    Parents of kids with allergies, when did they start to really understand that there are foods that could kill them?

    Teachers, how do they handle allergy kids in schools? I know there's no peanuts allowed, but what about nuts and sesame? Surely those aren't banned too? So do all kids get taught what the symptoms are to look out for allergy kids having a reaction at lunchtime when a teacher isn't around? Are all teachers trained to know the signs and how to use an epipen? Do they put all the allergy kids together in the one class so only 1 teacher and 1 set of kids have to assist in ensuring allergy kids are kept safe?

    I'm starting to get very nervous!
    There are no nuts at all allowed at our school (but it's not "nut free"), and kids with sesame allergies eat separately. Anyone who eats sesame has to wash hands and faces after.

    In regards to epipen, all teachers at our school are trained to use it.
    Last edited by DT75; 21-04-2015 at 10:13.

  9. #17
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8,351
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked
    4,888
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    There are no nuts at all allowed at our school (but it's not "nut free"), and kids with sesame allergies eat separately. Anyone who eats sesame has to wash hands and faces after.

    In regards to epipen, all teachers at our school are trained to use it.
    This is what I'm worried about too. DD being segregated from other kids. I like how a pp mentioned she splits the class in 2 so no one feels left out.

    Sesame is probably the hardest allergy as it's not as common yet there's sesame in sooooooo much!

  10. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,853
    Thanks
    1,079
    Thanked
    1,232
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    What is the reasoning behind that advice?
    Same as Loislane said, the school promotes itself as nut aware because they felt if they told parents they were nut free, it was giving a false sense of security to parents of children with allergies. There is just no way the teachers can know if a child has a nut product in their lunch. The kids know they are not allowed to share food.

  11. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17,763
    Thanks
    5,098
    Thanked
    8,703
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by GirlsRock View Post
    Same as Loislane said, the school promotes itself as nut aware because they felt if they told parents they were nut free, it was giving a false sense of security to parents of children with allergies. There is just no way the teachers can know if a child has a nut product in their lunch. The kids know they are not allowed to share food.
    This is our schools policy too. We have regular parent, teacher and student allergy awareness talks and demonstrations and we're all very aware of which students have allergies and to what.

  12. #20
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8,351
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked
    4,888
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by GirlsRock View Post
    Same as Loislane said, the school promotes itself as nut aware because they felt if they told parents they were nut free, it was giving a false sense of security to parents of children with allergies. There is just no way the teachers can know if a child has a nut product in their lunch. The kids know they are not allowed to share food.
    Ah ok, I thought you meant they don't even ban them at all. So they do request not to bring them but can't guarantee it? That makes sense.

    Are the same measures taken at childcare? I feel dd is still to young to understand she can't eat everything. She can say peanuts make me sick, nuts make me sick, sesame makes me sick but she still doesn't have any impulse control or know what death is so I can't use that as a deterrent not to eat what ever she wants.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Daycare food with allergies
    By Meld85 in forum Childcare Options
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-03-2015, 07:55
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 25-11-2014, 14:30
  3. Super congested every day - possible allergies, what can I take?
    By heartstringz in forum Pregnancy Health Issues
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-05-2014, 21:07

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
sales & new stuffsee all
Hills Swimming
Swim with your friends and you will all get a 33% discount!* We have programs to suit all ages and abilities, with small classes held in our warm indoor 25 metre pool. Highly qualified teachers, and award winning programs. *conditions apply
featured supporter
Transition into Parenthood / Calmbirth Sydney
Julie's Transition into Parenthood and Calmbirth courses for pregnant couples will get you ready, prepared and organised for the wonderful birth of your beautiful new baby. Birth Support Doula training provided in 2017 open to all. Call 0401 265 530
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!