+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 58
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Toowoomba
    Posts
    15,262
    Thanks
    628
    Thanked
    1,178
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 26/3/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Hootenanny View Post
    The quote was from Brian Morris who is a staunch advocate, and not from the study. He also talks about HIV, HPV, Penile Cancer etc. In regards to transmitting the disease you would have no more control over your son transmitting a disease than any other.

    I imagine people reading this who are anti-circ are recoiling in horror at the thought, and would rather be penniless than circ their child. I imagine they would be horrified to have their personal choices and beliefs be tied to their ability to produce an income for their family.

    it's a slippery slope asking for and allowing this power to given to the government.
    I didn't say his views were part of the study. The article is meant to be presented as an academic review of the findings from the study. Having his highly emotive views splashed throughout discredit it. Though, I can see they have tried to be balanced in other ways.

    As for the spreading of STIs...education is the key here not RIC. I have no control over what my son does when he reaches that stage in life but do hope I would have taught him enough about the importance of protection. They mentioned the risk factors with penile cancer in the article are so low that they're negligible whether the boy is intact or circumcised. The instances of UTIs can be reduce through proper care and hygiene though there will still be some cases no matter what.

    I'm with others who have commented though. Comparing RIC and vaccination is ludicrous. There are other much more effective ways to prevent the spread of STIs and this is the only way that RIC would impact anyone else's health. Vaccinating is the only way to stop the spread of VPDs and they definitely impact of the health of others.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Chunkydunks For This Useful Post:

    beebs  (13-04-2015)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3,054
    Thanks
    269
    Thanked
    1,053
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    My decision to vax or circumcise is 100% dependant on the science behind it. I vax, because the science says the benefit far outweighs the risk. I have always decided i would not circumcise, because science and the medical profession say that it is unneccesary. If that changed,and the medical profession as a whole said that RIC is neccesary and important for society because xyz studies show over & over again how beneficial it is in preventing disease,etc, i would circumcise. Im really dubious as to the source posted, because in australis, the majority of the medical profession do not support RIC, because the science says it is unneccesary. (Unless there is an issue specific to a child). If that changes, yes, i would circumsize my boys in line with that.
    Science does not say it is unnecessary, it says it is the parent's choice. The latest advice from CDC suggests parents receive comprehensive counselling on the risks and benefits of circumcision (sounding familiar?)

    http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/...tsheet-508.pdf

    Do I agree - No, am I swayed - No

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,368
    Thanks
    498
    Thanked
    1,479
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Ooh vaccination and circumcision combined in one glorious thread!
    *waits for all of Bubhub to explode*
    Popcorn, anyone?

    Agree that it is an interesting hypothetical Hootenanny

    ETA - I assume we're pretending this guy's opinion is actually based on sound evidence (which it doesn't seem to be, half of all uncirced men have phimosis, seriously?) and then considering the comparison to vaccinations and benefits. Right?
    Last edited by deku; 13-04-2015 at 16:43.

  5. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to deku For This Useful Post:

    beebs  (13-04-2015),BettyV  (13-04-2015),delirium  (13-04-2015),Gentoo  (13-04-2015),MsViking  (28-05-2015),Starfish30  (13-04-2015)

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3,054
    Thanks
    269
    Thanked
    1,053
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by HappyBovine View Post
    The irony in your argument is that the HPV vax also prevents a large percentage of cervical cancers.
    I know, but that vax is currently not on the schedule as far as I aware and there are other diseases, HIV being a massive one.
    Last edited by Hootenanny; 13-04-2015 at 16:57.

  7. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3,054
    Thanks
    269
    Thanked
    1,053
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by deku View Post
    Ooh vaccination and circumcision combined in one glorious thread!
    *waits for all of Bubhub to explode*
    Popcorn, anyone?

    Agree that it is an interesting hypothetical Hootenanny

    ETA - I assume we're pretending this guy's opinion is actually based on sound evidence (which it doesn't seem to be, half of all uncirced men have phimosis, seriously?) and then considering the comparison to vaccinations and benefits. Right?
    I know, on all fronts!!!

    But there is quite a bit of peer reviewed validated study that back this argument up. The CDC supports this view
    TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials are poised to endorse circumcision as a means of preventing HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday released its first-ever draft guidelines on circumcision that recommend that doctors counsel parents and uncircumcised males on the health benefits of the procedure.







    The guidelines do not outright call for circumcision of all male newborns, since that is a personal decision that may involve religious or cultural preferences, Dr. Jonathan Mermin, director of the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, ViralHepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, told the Associated Press.
    But "the scientific evidence is clear that the benefits outweigh the risks," Mermin said.
    It is purely hypothetical but maybe gives another perspective to the changes.

  8. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    166
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked
    66
    Reviews
    0
    The statements made in that article are pretty extreme at times.
    But if I have a son I will definitely consider circumcision.
    My partner hasn't been circumcised, but he has an issue with the foreskin tearing during unprotected sex which is extremely painful for him and makes TTC difficult! Was on a waiting list for 5 years before he could get an appointment to see a specialist about it, and is now on a waiting list for at least a year to have it removed. removal is going to be a lot more painful than for a child (a friend of his has also had to have this fine)

    And yes, he does have good hygiene.

  9. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanks
    774
    Thanked
    1,772
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hootenanny View Post
    Science does not say it is unnecessary, it says it is the parent's choice. The latest advice from CDC suggests parents receive comprehensive counselling on the risks and benefits of circumcision (sounding familiar?)

    http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/...tsheet-508.pdf

    Do I agree - No, am I swayed - No
    i cant quote online, as i am on my phone, but the policy in aust. is currently that the risks of circumcision far outweigh the benefits,and RIC id not recommended. However,it is the parents choice if they do decide to circumcise anyway (royal college of

  10. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanks
    774
    Thanked
    1,772
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    ... sorry, royal australasian college of physicians. Therefore, although the medical profession do not (currently) see that RIC is worth the risks, parents can choose to do it if they wish, as it is not illegal. IF that changed, and the advice in Aust. was thay the benefit of circing far outweighed the risks, then yes, i would circ. But so far, science and the medical profession say it does not.

  11. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,179
    Thanks
    1,414
    Thanked
    748
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by deku View Post
    Ooh vaccination and circumcision combined in one glorious thread!
    *waits for all of Bubhub to explode*
    Popcorn, anyone?
    Ooh! Can we somehow incorporate BF vs FF too? Definitely going to need some popcorn! 😉

  12. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    3,054
    Thanks
    269
    Thanked
    1,053
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    i cant quote online, as i am on my phone, but the policy in aust. is currently that the risks of circumcision far outweigh the benefits,and RIC id not recommended. However,it is the parents choice if they do decide to circumcise anyway (royal college of
    I can post it for you

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians, 2010

    The most recent and authoritative statement was issued by the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in October 2010. This document states clearly:
    “After reviewing the currently available evidence, the RACP believes that the frequency of diseases modifiable by circumcision, the level of protection offered by circumcision and the complication rates of circumcision do not warrant routine infant circumcision in Australia and New Zealand.”

    The policy also points out that routine circumcision is under strong attack from bioethics and human rights advocates, “because it is recognised that the foreskin has a functional role, the operation is non-therapeutic and the infant is unable to consent.”
    Summing up the pros and cons, the statement continues: “The decision to circumcise or not to circumcise involves weighing up potential harms and potential benefits. The potential benefits include connectedness for particular socio-cultural groups and decreased risk of some diseases. The potential harms include contravention of individual rights, loss of choice, loss of function, procedural and psychological complications.”
    That being the case, it would appear that the potential harms outweigh the potential benefits, meaning that the circumcision decision is one that can properly be made only by the person who must bear the consequences. The new statement leaves this issue open, but does point out that leaving the circumcision decision to be made by the boy when he is old enough to understand the issues and make an informed choice has the merit of respecting individual autonomy and preserving all the options:
    “The option of leaving circumcision until later, when the boy is old enough to make a decision for himself does need to be raised with parents and considered. This option has recently been recommended by the Royal Dutch Medical Association. The ethical merit of this option is that it seeks to respect the child’s physical integrity, and capacity for autonomy by leaving the options open for him to make his own autonomous choice in the future.”
    So individual rights, loss of choice and respecting individual autonomy counts for something in regards to circumcision............ (as it should!)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Know the risks of D&C's - Asherman's Syndrome
    By Starf1sh in forum Pregnancy Loss Support
    Replies: 256
    Last Post: 15-11-2016, 10:20
  2. Family tax benefits
    By maternidade in forum Family Finances
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 30-06-2014, 23:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Riverton Leisureplex
An Extreme Family Pass at Riverton Leisureplex is the ultimate way to cool off during the summer school holidays. The $30 Pass allows pool and waterslide access for 2 adults and 2 children, as well as a drink, popcorn and an icy pole for each person.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Pea Pods Reusable Nappies
Pea Pods are the smart choice when it comes to choosing what's best for you, your baby and the environment. Affordable and simple to use, Pea Pods keep your baby dry & happy. Visit our website to find your nearest stockist or order online.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!