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  1. #11
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    I agree with PPs to focus on independence skills over academic learning. Shoes/jumper on off, toileting, using a tissue etc.

    In addition to that, fine motor skills, such as cutting, rolling dough and coordination skills like pouring. Also, following instructions and packing away.

    For numbers, rather than worry about how high they can 'count' (aka say the words) to, focus on building one-to-one correlation. Eg. "Can you get out three plates?" then count each one together as she takes them out,then again as she lays them on the table.

    The reading eggs programming is great. It gave my DD a huge head start. The books however are a bit nonsense without doing the programme. For example, they might be referring to Floobs or Watch as - words that are not real and can't be decoded unless you're familiar with them from the programme.

    Check out your local library for first readers. Start with ones with a repeated word (eg. 'The') plus a word they can work out from the picture (eg. Cat, car, apple) on each page. The librarians will be a great help in how to progress through.

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  3. #12
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    wow!! thanks everyone for all your wonderful ideas!!! all this gives me a very good idea as to what to aim for..
    good point about the local library Streched! i definatly should check ours out rather than buyng books..
    with the reading eggs i had a feeling i shuld do the online prgramme first because the books themselves are abit confusing as to how to start..


    thanks again everyone!!

  4. #13
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    Wonderful thread.....

    I'm wondering about my nearly 3 year old. So this thread is good.

    I'm not sure what a 3 year old should be doing. But reading this his doing ok.

  5. #14
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    Definitely focus on social skills and independence rather than academic type things. I run a kindergarten program and also used to be a school teacher.

    I send my class off to school being able to care for their own belongings and being independent.

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    Can I just say as a teacher it kind of upsets me (wrong word but I can't think of a better one) to think that parents worry about what they 'should' be getting their kids to know before they go to school?

    Any good teacher will take a child from exactly whatever point they're at; they will treat them with dignity no matter what they know/don't know; and they see it as primarily their role to educate every child to the best of their ability.

    I'm not saying don't teach them things - just, please don't feel pressured about what you think your child should be able to do. A happy and loved child is in the best position possible to learn. If they show interest in something like reading before they go to school, then by all means nurture that, but if not, then that's cool too.

    Kids don't get to be kids for very long at all any more :-(

    Oh, except I totally agree with BRV - a fully toilet trained child is really really important for their social and emotional wellbeing.

    I'm also not meaning to seem like I am picking on this thread, it's just that I see these threads often. I think those early years between a parent and child are like nothing else, and there is a whole lifetime there for learning 'school' style. Children learn in their own time, when they're ready, and nothing anyone can do can actually change that.

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  9. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    Can I just say as a teacher it kind of upsets me (wrong word but I can't think of a better one) to think that parents worry about what they 'should' be getting their kids to know before they go to school?

    Any good teacher will take a child from exactly whatever point they're at; they will treat them with dignity no matter what they know/don't know; and they see it as primarily their role to educate every child to the best of their ability.

    I'm not saying don't teach them things - just, please don't feel pressured about what you think your child should be able to do. A happy and loved child is in the best position possible to learn. If they show interest in something like reading before they go to school, then by all means nurture that, but if not, then that's cool too.

    Kids don't get to be kids for very long at all any more :-(

    Oh, except I totally agree with BRV - a fully toilet trained child is really really important for their social and emotional wellbeing.

    I'm also not meaning to seem like I am picking on this thread, it's just that I see these threads often. I think those early years between a parent and child are like nothing else, and there is a whole lifetime there for learning 'school' style. Children learn in their own time, when they're ready, and nothing anyone can do can actually change that.
    It's hard because I KNOW all of what you said is true and right. Then the other part of me worries she will start behind and lose confidence and not catch up. I know they aren't rational thoughts, but they are so hard to control.

    My DD is the same age OP and about the same level with what she can do. She really struggles with wiping her bum so we need to work on that. So hard because she has a grown up sized butt, there's like 5 acres of butt cheek to try and clean out.

    Will try and take a chill pill! We are leaning towards the kinder within the day care. The hours in the normal one are a bit sucky.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    Can I just say as a teacher it kind of upsets me (wrong word but I can't think of a better one) to think that parents worry about what they 'should' be getting their kids to know before they go to school?

    Any good teacher will take a child from exactly whatever point they're at; they will treat them with dignity no matter what they know/don't know; and they see it as primarily their role to educate every child to the best of their ability.

    I'm not saying don't teach them things - just, please don't feel pressured about what you think your child should be able to do. A happy and loved child is in the best position possible to learn. If they show interest in something like reading before they go to school, then by all means nurture that, but if not, then that's cool too.

    Kids don't get to be kids for very long at all any more :-(

    Oh, except I totally agree with BRV - a fully toilet trained child is really really important for their social and emotional wellbeing.

    I'm also not meaning to seem like I am picking on this thread, it's just that I see these threads often. I think those early years between a parent and child are like nothing else, and there is a whole lifetime there for learning 'school' style. Children learn in their own time, when they're ready, and nothing anyone can do can actually change that.
    Couldn't agree more.

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  13. #18
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    @Wise Enough I should add that I am sure I am a total hypocrite. For the first year of DS's life I was obsessed with checking his milestones and where he should be and where he was ahead and behind etc.

    And today I may have been beyond excited when he counted 6 of his damn Woolies dominoes with one to one correspondence and even spent a couple of minutes trying to teach him to read/write/ANYTHING his name!

    So I do understand. And I know it's not as easy as just 'knowing' this kind of thing. It just seems to be another thing that parents get competitive about, or down on themselves about, and I feel sad when I see that happen...

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    Can I just say as a teacher it kind of upsets me (wrong word but I can't think of a better one) to think that parents worry about what they 'should' be getting their kids to know before they go to school?

    Any good teacher will take a child from exactly whatever point they're at; they will treat them with dignity no matter what they know/don't know; and they see it as primarily their role to educate every child to the best of their ability.

    I'm not saying don't teach them things - just, please don't feel pressured about what you think your child should be able to do. A happy and loved child is in the best position possible to learn. If they show interest in something like reading before they go to school, then by all means nurture that, but if not, then that's cool too.

    Kids don't get to be kids for very long at all any more :-(

    Oh, except I totally agree with BRV - a fully toilet trained child is really really important for their social and emotional wellbeing.

    I'm also not meaning to seem like I am picking on this thread, it's just that I see these threads often. I think those early years between a parent and child are like nothing else, and there is a whole lifetime there for learning 'school' style. Children learn in their own time, when they're ready, and nothing anyone can do can actually change that.
    Harvs thanyou SO much for your lovely reply!! I always love it when teachers reply and give a practical perspective!! this is what i need to know...i've gotten so much mixed messages from my friends and family that Iam really confused so your reponse really helps!!

    a friend who wants her DD to goto a local private school said for kindy entery they actually have an entrance exam and basic math like 1+1=2, 1+2=3 etc is supposedto be known!! i was so shocked!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Enough View Post
    My DD is the same age OP and about the same level with what she can do. She really struggles with wiping her bum so we need to work on that. So hard because she has a grown up sized butt, there's like 5 acres of butt cheek to try and clean out.

    .
    It's not an easy thing to teach is it. My DS only has a little tooshie but it just seems his arms are not long enough to reach back there. I kind of put the toilet paper in his hand and guide his hand with mine but it's a real stretch for him. Anyone know a easier way to teach bum wiping?


 

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