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  1. #1
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    Default Primary school supervision Q

    Ds is in prep and teachers supervise the yard from 8.30am (we are advised not to drop off before then) and teachers supervise at lunch/recess. By law teachers must perform their yard duty otherwise they could be liable if an incident occurs. (I work in a high school and due to a family suing the school, we are extra vigilant now).

    Anyway today I took Ds to school at the end of lunch and I noticed then when the bell rang, the prep students all line up waiting and the yard duty teachers were walking towards the building (I assume for their own classes). The students were unsupervised for around 5 min until their class teacher turned up. Is this fairly normal? I understand students are often unsupervised at random times (eg- going to the toilet in pairs, retuning something to the office etc), but in this case it's 26 kids lined up.

    The main reason I'm asking is because if you've followed some of my posts, my Ds is being tested for possible ADHD or ASD and without supervision / structured time, he acts out and gets into trouble. Apparently with supervision and while working in class he's quite good. At the moment he can't have an aide because nothing's been diagnosed yet. Incidents are occurring while in the line / yard while waiting for a teacher. I can drill him to be kind and keep his hands to himself etc, but no one is there to supervise. Thanks for reading.
    Last edited by 2BlueBirds; 19-03-2015 at 12:12.

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    My daughter is also in prep. They can be dropped off from 8 am onwards (there is a teacher on yard duty) and class starts at 8.30. At 8.25 the bell rings to tell the children to get ready and line up, (those 5 minutes give them a chance to also put their hat in their bag, go to the toilet and get a drink of water) and their teacher arrives at 8.30 to unlock the classroom and commence class.

    I'm not sure it would be possible to have someone supervise those five minutes. As not every child is lined up, some are in the toilet, some haven't arrived yet, etc..

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    No it's not normal. We don't know if the teacher is always late, so with only the info provided I would say that the teacher got held up with something else.
    Protocol dictates that you go as soon as you hear the bell to pick up where the teacher on duty left off

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    Now that's an interesting question. I've mostly taught in high schools, but a little in primary schools as well. I have seen that happen on a regular basis.

    My thought would be that the classroom teacher would be the one with a duty of care as soon as lunch ends, and that for younger age groups especially they should be there and waiting at the end of lunch. I know that isn't always possible (especially if the teacher has just had a duty themselves).

    If you're concerned, I'd suggest bringing it up with the principal, deputy or someone in a senior position. I'd phrase it as "so, my son's having some difficulties with his behaviour whilst lining up, just wondering who's responsible for supervision during this time as I noticed noone was there?". That might be enough to prompt a reminder or clarification to go out to the teachers.

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    Thanks for your replies.
    Well yesterday we had our paed appointment and Ds might have ADHD. So I've emailed the special needs coordinator about my concerns (like not being actively supervised after the first bell) and asked about what can be done while we wait for official diagnoses and treatment.

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    I'm a teacher and if we're not on duty, we're expected to be at the line by the time the bell rings. Teachers on duty are usually walking across the yard as the kids are all going to their lines, but they go straight to their class' line - not inside for a drink or anything. Most just get kids to return their hi vis vests and walkie talkies rather than do it themselves so supervision is always there. Not every school is this vigilant though and that's when issues in the line occur...

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    I would bring it up with the teacher that you're a bit worried about it.
    Funnily enough I'll go against the general posts here and say in most schools I've worked in there is always a gap between coming off duty and getting to class. It's hard because the teacher on duty has to get to their class but that often means leaving the kids who you were supervising to get there. If you get what I mean.
    Often stuff happens in that time. ... so most teachers try to get to their class. But yeah. .. It can be difficult.


 

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