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  1. #61
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    I also wanted to add, I live in a farming community where we grow a lot of the everyday foods everyone in this thread would eat. While I am not a farmer myself I know there are restrictions (at least in NSW) about what they spray with, concentration levels etc. These people are not going to ruin their livelihoods and risk the farm that has been in the family for 4 generations to sell you food that is going to kill you. Everything I have read is that a quick wash under water is all that is needed.

    If there are any risks it's the overseas fruit and veg.

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  3. #62
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    Default Feel like I'm poisoning my kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I also wanted to add, I live in a farming community where we grow a lot of the everyday foods everyone in this thread would eat. While I am not a farmer myself I know there are restrictions (at least in NSW) about what they spray with, concentration levels etc. These people are not going to ruin their livelihoods and risk the farm that has been in the family for 4 generations to sell you food that is going to kill you. Everything I have read is that a quick wash under water is all that is needed.

    If there are any risks it's the overseas fruit and veg.
    I agree but the farmers in WA did and probably because no one ever checked them! My point being I know they don't intentionally do it but I just prefer to be safe than sorry and thankfully we have a choice

    But yes I definitely agree with risks from imported fruit and veg

  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Here's the thing... it's not that there's no proven link, it's been disproven again and again. Granted, it's not absolutely conclusive. It's possible that a link could still be found. There has been no research though to suggest that the link is genuine.

    LOTS of parents believe that sugar affects their childrens' behaviour. There have been studies done where parents are told that their children have had sugary foods when they haven't; ones where parents observe their childrens' behaviour and say whether or not they think they've had sugar; ones where children are fed similar foods with sugar/artificial sweeteners....time and again no link whatsoever has been found between children consuming sugar and their behaviour, although the parents are often convinced that there is.

    What there IS a link between though, is excitement and 'hyper' behaviour. So the situation of being at a party, or being at Nanna's house etc. where they may eat sweet things can certainly affect behaviour. If children rarely get sweet foods, the excitement of a 'treat' can also affect their behaviour.

    On top of those potential explanations, we all have what's called a confirmation bias; it's how our brains work. If we believe something is the case, then we automatically filter out things which go against that belief, and we pick up on those things which seem to confirm our beliefs. That means that if we think sugar=hyperactivity, we notice those behaviours far more when our kids have eaten sugar than we would at any other time.

    There was an interesting study done with a group of mothers, who were told that their kids were drinking either a sugary drink or an artificially sweetened drink. The mums who thought their kids had had sugar reported that their children were more hyperactive etc. than those who thought their kids hadn't had sugar. On top of that, the mums who thought their kids had had sugar were observed as being harsher on their kids: staying closer to them, criticizing their behaviour more. What they were told about the drink was the ONLY experimental difference between the two groups.
    It's very difficult to conclusively disprove something, because everyone reacts differently. And all it takes it one case to make it true (one true case anyway).

    I was very thorough with keeping an eye on food reactions when I first met the kids (because DH has lactose and gluten intolerance).

    I kept food diaries for both for 2 years. I also made notes of events where it could be excitement.

    Time and again, they got "hyperactive" (trying to find another word, but that is what their behaviour shows as) with fruit (all types), sugary treats (choc, etc), sugary snacks, and high sugar veg.

    They do get sugary things often, so it's not the excitement of having it. And it's a good hour AFTER it's eaten that their behaviour changes.
    I also didn't go into this with a "sugar makes them like this" view... I learnt that.

    I'm not saying it IS sugar, or that is is sugar alone.
    Just that sugary foods and fruit cause this reaction in my two.

    I am also well aware of the studies done, we studied lots of them in Nutrition and Paediatrics as part of my course.

  5. #64
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    @DT75
    That's really interesting. It'd be fascinating to know whether it IS actually the sugar in their case, and if so what the mechanism is.

    With regard to finding any link in research though, for NO link whatsoever to be found (consistently), it would either have to be the case that a hyperactive reaction is exceedingly rare (so much so that no statistically significant differences between control and experimental groups are ever found), or that an equal number of children react to sugar by becoming LESS active/excitible etc.

  6. #65
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    Found this interesting:
    http://m.theaustralian.com.au/life/f...-1227259740471

    Parents buy the book, trying to do the right thing and then they hear this.

  7. #66
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    I have not posted here for some time but I share similar concerns with the OP. My children are my motivation, and have inspired me to look for solutions. I am busy,cash strapped mother to 3 little kids, plus I am a Town planner and work is getting busy. I have terrible will power sometimes and forget to stick with my ethical eating plan. I have just finished grocery shop online at aussie farmers direct.They have family boxes organic fruit and veg and they are delivering tomorrow. I only spent what needed to because I could review my shopping cart. I do have a freezer full of organic meat that I purchase from the farmer but my local butcher is fantastic, so I go to him too. I have a directory similar sevices. Message me I you would like some details for your area.

    I am boycotting coles and woolworths. There are a number of more ethical choices out there. We needfarmers.
    Last edited by spoon; 12-03-2015 at 15:52.

  8. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    @DT75
    That's really interesting. It'd be fascinating to know whether it IS actually the sugar in their case, and if so what the mechanism is.

    With regard to finding any link in research though, for NO link whatsoever to be found (consistently), it would either have to be the case that a hyperactive reaction is exceedingly rare (so much so that no statistically significant differences between control and experimental groups are ever found), or that an equal number of children react to sugar by becoming LESS active/excitible etc.
    Yeah, I've kept the diaries, and am considering doing one May 2015-May 2016 to see if it has changed at all.... the reactions have changed slightly as they get older and, presumably, can digest more.

    Yes, but it's statistical. So say 5 groups of 5000 kids are studied... that's still only 25000 kids... and each group studied would be mainly similar cultures, etc... So it's not very broad or far-reaching... nothing is really.

  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    Yes, but it's statistical. So say 5 groups of 5000 kids are studied... that's still only 25000 kids... and each group studied would be mainly similar cultures, etc... So it's not very broad or far-reaching... nothing is really.
    Sorry, but this is a pet peeve; people dismissing statistics. Quality statistics are extremely useful, and far more reliable than personal anecdotes. Yes, they need to be of high quality - there is an entire field of mathematics dealing with this: what numbers you need with what kinds of variables to be applicable with what level of error to which populations etc. Yes, there are plenty of crappy stats around... but when high quality statistics are collected with scientific rigor, they are EXTREMELY accurate and reliable. Not 100%, no, but the best we have for modelling and prediction.

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  11. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    Found this interesting:
    http://m.theaustralian.com.au/life/f...-1227259740471

    Parents buy the book, trying to do the right thing and then they hear this.
    In a statement, publisher Pan Macmillan Australia said the publication of Bubba Yum Yum: The Paleo Way had been delayed “but not recalled”.
    Meh, probably just anti-press from whoever owns/sponsors The Australian. I do understand why the publisher would be hesitant to include home made formula recipes though.

  12. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Sorry, but this is a pet peeve; people dismissing statistics. Quality statistics are extremely useful, and far more reliable than personal anecdotes. Yes, they need to be of high quality - there is an entire field of mathematics dealing with this: what numbers you need with what kinds of variables to be applicable with what level of error to which populations etc. Yes, there are plenty of crappy stats around... but when high quality statistics are collected with scientific rigor, they are EXTREMELY accurate and reliable. Not 100%, no, but the best we have for modelling and prediction.
    I'm not dismissing (in the same way that someone saying "but statistically that's unlikely" is not dismissing). I work with statistics a lot.
    It's just that a statistic that is less than 100% reliable (which is all of them, really), means that there is a possibility of cases that do not conform to that statistic.
    Last edited by DT75; 13-03-2015 at 11:09.


 

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