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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    That's because they are so new the science behind them is still being discovered ( if that makes sense!)

    Surely you agree trying to eat an additive and preservative free diet is better for your health - that is what most of us are saying - go back to a fresh diet and limit processed refined foods , eat animals that eat a diet that they are designed to eat - not a processed one
    Yep, absolutely. I just take issue with absolute assertions which are not evidence based. There are so many reasons to eat a whole-foods based diet. I think there's more harm than good in asserting that certain things simply ARE dangerous/should be avoided etc. when the science doesn't back it: it panics people without proven benefits.

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  3. #52
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    No matter how much you try and fancify your kids diet they are probably still going to stick their finger up their nose and eat it

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  5. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    No matter how much you try and fancify your kids diet they are probably still going to stick their finger up their nose and eat it
    Haha VP
    But I must say, sticking your finger up your nose and eating it might actually help build the immune system.
    Unfortunately bad diets can lead to worse problems.
    However I do agree with most of you, great points all around.
    My children's diet is certainly not perfect at all.

  6. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I totally disagree

    With the organic argument I buy organic as its more ethical for the animal and I know for sure it's chemical free - Google the omega 6/3 ratio , it's frightening , non organic meat and chicken are fed food that is messing with the natural omega 6/3 ratio which is causing havoc on our system

    Plus consumers are very misled as to what pesticides and practices are deemed "safe" - a prime example is the pesticide fenthion has just been banned here after they discovered harmful levels on fruit in WA - ( up until 3 years ago NO government department was testing/checking that the farmers were using the correct amount of pesticides ) people were buying this fruit believing it was safe - imagine what else the government is not checking!

    http://m.watoday.com.au/wa-news/bird...314-34pkj.html

    An APVMA risk assessment of residues that was published in September 2012 found that on smooth skin stone fruit, such as nectarines and plums, fruit picked after seven days of spraying – the previous withholding period - had residues levels that were a risk to children.
    In relation to organic meat, and it being ethical, I agree. But you can buy meat in butchers and supermarkets that are ethical and hormone free without them being strictly organic. I buy chicken breast from Woolies that is RSPCA certified but it isn't necessarily organically fed.

    As to pesticides, we'll just have to agree to disagree.

    I don't have an issue with people buying organic I just think they are having the wool pulled over their eyes. In particular, in one of the pages I linked they talked about how organic is not good for the environment either. But people automatically think it is.

  7. #55
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    Just clearing something up: No meat from animals raised in Australia has been given artificial hormones. It is illegal to feed hormones to animals here. Fresh pork and pork products such as bacon are being imported from overseas and there is no guarantee that this is hormone free, so if you are worried about hormones, always buy Australian meat.

    I agree with @delirium re organic. There is no real board that can certify organic so you also don't really know what you're getting (there are lots of different organic labels, who knows what they all mean). It's also a first world "problem". Organic foods are not at all sustainable. To produce the same amount of food, organic produce takes up far more arable land for far less yield, which is reflected in the price difference. They also use more water. Any leftover pesticide/herbicide residue on normal food is easily washed off under the tap.

    For people wanting to eat healthier it isn't rocket science. Choose fresh, whole foods over processed and refined ones the majority of the time. It's that simple

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  9. #56
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    Default Feel like I'm poisoning my kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    In relation to organic meat, and it being ethical, I agree. But you can buy meat in butchers and supermarkets that are ethical and hormone free without them being strictly organic. I buy chicken breast from Woolies that is RSPCA certified but it isn't necessarily organically fed.

    As to pesticides, we'll just have to agree to disagree.

    I don't have an issue with people buying organic I just think they are having the wool pulled over their eyes. In particular, in one of the pages I linked they talked about how organic is not good for the environment either. But people automatically think it is.
    RSPCA certified does not guarantee outdoor access for the chickens and their stock density is still nearly double the organic specification per square metre - which is why I only buy organic ( plus their feed is pesticide free)

    Hormones are not a problem but it's the feed lots and what is in the feed for beef that I don't like , which is why grass fed and organic is better for us and them ( it's actually really hard to source grass fed only beef as there are only a handful of farms that don't use feedlots or luckily all Tasmanian beef is grass fed )

    Again I am fussy about the animal welfare aspect and the quality of the meat which is why I'm so pedantic about what I buy and where is comes from , I haven't eaten meat for 28 years but I do buy it for DS and DH twice a week

    With the organic fruit and veg again I just prefer to buy in season, fresh pesticide free because I want too and I believe it to be better for us - with the harmful pesticides found in WA fruit and the frozen raspberry debacle the fact is that you really do not know how safe your produce is as our government does not check it!!!

  10. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    2 relevant things:

    1) sugar = hyperactivity is a myth. It's been disproven again and again. I have heard some connection between certain fruits and hyperactivity...undoubtedly someone here can explain what it is in the fruit. Haven't looked into it personally; not sure what evidence there is.

    2) Absolutely, our bodies remove toxins. It's why we have kidneys, a liver, etc :P 'detoxing' is completely unnecessary and potentially harmful.
    Hyperactive was the word that came to mind.
    And perhaps there is no proven link.
    But MY two step kids are nuts after sugary snacks, and fruit.
    (And some vegetables... they seem to be the ones with a higher sugar content too).
    Last edited by DT75; 12-03-2015 at 14:06.

  11. #58
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    But as Pearlygirl said, nothing is guaranteed with the organic label either. You really can't prove you are getting all those things anyway. Organic means they get organic grains to eat, not that they automatically are ethically treated. While I agree there is a higher likelihood they are, we don't know for sure.

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  13. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    Aren't Aldi's products all preservative and additive free. Not that I buy them, but that's what I've heard. Or am I missing something, am I that naive?
    They don't use artificial colourings but preservative 222is in almost everything they sell which is a shame.


    I don't think there is need for panic, it sounds like you are doing your best within your resources.

    Ours has been changes over a period of time. Reducing the amount of packaged foods, reducing wheat to once a day, increasing veges, minimising refined sugars.

    I buy meat at the butcher, fruit and veg at the farmers market, organic milk, yoghurt and butter at the local IGA and other bits and pieces (cat food, plastic wrap, hand soap etc) at Aldi.

    For me, it is common sense if I read the ingredients on something and it is not immediately recognisable as a food item then I will avoid it, 90% of time time.

    But, it is important to not become paranoid, life is for living, not obsessing. My kids get an iceblock if we go to the pool, they eat what is available at other people's houses etc.
    Last edited by NoteToSelf; 12-03-2015 at 14:14.

  14. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    Hyperactive was the word that came to mind.
    And perhaps there is no proven link.
    But MY two step kids are nuts after sugary snacks, and fruit.
    Here's the thing... it's not that there's no proven link, it's been disproven again and again. Granted, it's not absolutely conclusive. It's possible that a link could still be found. There has been no research though to suggest that the link is genuine.

    LOTS of parents believe that sugar affects their childrens' behaviour. There have been studies done where parents are told that their children have had sugary foods when they haven't; ones where parents observe their childrens' behaviour and say whether or not they think they've had sugar; ones where children are fed similar foods with sugar/artificial sweeteners....time and again no link whatsoever has been found between children consuming sugar and their behaviour, although the parents are often convinced that there is.

    What there IS a link between though, is excitement and 'hyper' behaviour. So the situation of being at a party, or being at Nanna's house etc. where they may eat sweet things can certainly affect behaviour. If children rarely get sweet foods, the excitement of a 'treat' can also affect their behaviour.

    On top of those potential explanations, we all have what's called a confirmation bias; it's how our brains work. If we believe something is the case, then we automatically filter out things which go against that belief, and we pick up on those things which seem to confirm our beliefs. That means that if we think sugar=hyperactivity, we notice those behaviours far more when our kids have eaten sugar than we would at any other time.

    There was an interesting study done with a group of mothers, who were told that their kids were drinking either a sugary drink or an artificially sweetened drink. The mums who thought their kids had had sugar reported that their children were more hyperactive etc. than those who thought their kids hadn't had sugar. On top of that, the mums who thought their kids had had sugar were observed as being harsher on their kids: staying closer to them, criticizing their behaviour more. What they were told about the drink was the ONLY experimental difference between the two groups.

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