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  1. #31
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    I don't worry too much about food. I'm too lazy I guess but I let DS eat a bit of anything really. In general I think we're very healthy though. I think the human body is very good at eliminating toxins anyway. The air we breathe has bits of toxins in it, as does so many thinks in the environment. I'd have to see the biochemical pathways to be convinced I'm being harmfully poisoned. In saying this, we eat fresh food as much as possible and we have chickens so get fresh eggs daily. DS is 4 though and pretty fussy so I give him more processed food than would like.

    I have a friend who worries incessantly over food. She says her toddler goes hyper after eating sugary food etc. but I've seen her toddler go hyper many a time... I wonder if she doesn't realise toddlers go hyper just because they're toddlers? And many people blame every health issue on gluten without just cause.

    It's good to be aware of eating healthily but I think we can obsess over it too much these days. Our bodies can cope with detox very well on it's own too.

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  3. #32
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    2 relevant things:

    1) sugar = hyperactivity is a myth. It's been disproven again and again. I have heard some connection between certain fruits and hyperactivity...undoubtedly someone here can explain what it is in the fruit. Haven't looked into it personally; not sure what evidence there is.

    2) Absolutely, our bodies remove toxins. It's why we have kidneys, a liver, etc :P 'detoxing' is completely unnecessary and potentially harmful.

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  5. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    2 relevant things:

    1) sugar = hyperactivity is a myth. It's been disproven again and again. I have heard some connection between certain fruits and hyperactivity...undoubtedly someone here can explain what it is in the fruit. Haven't looked into it personally; not sure what evidence there is.

    2) Absolutely, our bodies remove toxins. It's why we have kidneys, a liver, etc :P 'detoxing' is completely unnecessary and potentially harmful.
    Salicylates have been linked to hyperactivity (amongst other things) and are found in a lot of fruit and veg. I don't know much more than that though as I've just started researching.

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  7. #34
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    I don't mean this at all in an offensive way, but I think people have swung the other way with diet. I read they are deeming it as a new eating disorder (it actually has a name which escapes me) where some are getting so obsessive with healthy eating i.e organic, vegan, gluten and diary free it's actually become bad for them.

    Science shows organic is no better for your health. I know I'm going to be beaten with sticks but several studies around with world with huge cohorts consistently show organic food is a jip. It tastes better, but is no better nutritionally.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...l#.VP-tGfmSziU

    http://theconversation.com/organic-f...you-study-9300

    For me personally, the answer is just sensible moderation. Cut back on refined rubbish, eat lots of fruit and veg, get protein, be it from meat or legumes/eggs etc. Exercise and be active.

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  9. #35
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    http://www.salon.com/2015/01/30/were...ing_disorders/

    We’re clean eating our way to new eating disorders

    Is orthorexia about to join the DSM?

    Because overdoing it is the American way, we’ve now managed to warp even healthy habits into a new form of eating disorders. Welcome to the era of orthorexia.

    As Heather Hansman notes this week in Fast Company, orthorexia differs from other forms of disorders in that the obsessive focus is not on how much or how little one consumes, but the perceived virtue of the food itself. As she reports, “Nutritionists and psychologists say thatthey’re seeing it more often, especially in the face of restrictive food trends, like gluten-free, and growing information about where food comes from, and how it’s grown and processed.” Though the term has been in use since Dr. Steven Bratman coined it in 1997, the uptick in cases is leading to a new push to formally include it in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – aka the DSM 5.
    Along with “gluten-free,” “juice fast” and other phrases, you may have been hearing “orthorexia” a lot more lately. Last summer, popular health and food blogger Jordan Younger made headlines – and faced intense criticism – when she announced that she was “transitioning away from veganism” as she realized that she had “started fearing a LOT of things when it came to food,” and had been struggling with orthorexia. Her blog now is called “The Balanced Blonde,” where she talks honestly about her journey to wellness. In a recent post, she observed, “It. Breaks. My. Heart. It breaks my heart to see and hear beautiful, motivated, capable young women being sucked in to an extreme diet and way of life because it has been branded to them as ‘THE HEALTHIEST WAY TO LIVE’ above all else.”


    It’s true, this kind of disordered mentality does seem to disproportionately target “beautiful, motivated, capable young women.” Because I like to cook and eat, and because I’ve had life threatening cancer, in recent years I’ve grown more conscious and curious about how I feed myself and my family. To that end, I read a fair number of cookbooks and food blogs, in particular those with a bent toward healthy eating. And it has not escaped my attention that there have been several wildly successful books in the past few years – often featuring pretty, thin, blond women – that I have had to put down and think, “Oh my God, these people should not be giving advice.” But the creeping fear of food isn’t just for women who look like pilates instructors. Just last week, my spouse attempted to make dinner plans with an old friend, who quickly rejected multiple suggestions of places to eat after citing a litany of foods he would no longer touch. This is not a thigh gap aspiring, crunchy young woman we’re talking about here. This is a man in his 50s.
    Reading some of the “clean” living writing out there, including bestselling books by authors with cult-like followings, you can find dubious claims about “detoxing” – which is not a real thingunless maybe you don’t have a liver. Enthusiastic endorsements of extreme juice cleanses and fasting – sometimes with a side of *****ics. Blanket and inaccurate statements about grains, dairy, animal products, even seemingly innocuous foods like spinach or fruit. But what’s always the tipoff for me that something is a little off is when writing about food and health veers into near obsessive mathematical precision – detailed tips on exactly how much to eat, when to eat, what to combine it with. (For what it’s worth, in contrast, I find the work of Mark Bittman and Jamie Oliver reliably sane and inspiring.)
    Food sensitivities and intolerances are real, and there’s zero denying that the Standard American Diet is flat-out deadly. It’s making us fatter and sicker than we’ve ever been at any point in our history, and it’s hurting our children worst of all. But for those who are vulnerable, a quest to eat right can lead to a seriously dysfunctional relationship with food. And we need to have better understanding of eating disorders and support for those who are struggling, because being healthy of body means being healthy of mind too.

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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clementine Grace View Post
    I find it scary too. I try really hard to not buy anything in a packet for my toddler. It scares me the amount of numbers on "children's" food. My kid goes totally hypo on sugar too. One aldi cereal fruit bar makes him crazy for 2 hrs.

    I just try do a big bake up of snacks once a fortnight as well as a pile of portioned dinners/lunches it makes it easier. Free range eggs, organic biodynamic meat etc. He still gets odd treats especially when we're out but It worries me the amount of chemicals in their food. When we shop we try make a rule, bare minimum of anything in a packet.
    Aren't Aldi's products all preservative and additive free. Not that I buy them, but that's what I've heard. Or am I missing something, am I that naive?

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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post

    Science shows organic is no better for your health. I know I'm going to be beaten with sticks but several studies around with world with huge cohorts consistently show organic food is a jip. It tastes better, but is no better nutritionally.
    The point of organic is not that is tastes better or contains more nutrients, but that most mass produced fruit and veg are sprayed with synthetic pesticides, so by buying organic you are avoiding eating the residue which has been proven to be found on non-organic produce.

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  15. #39
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    I'm a patient at the RPA allergy clinic, they are rwally good, very knowledgeable, but they say never undertake an elimination diet without medical consultation
    Quote Originally Posted by HappyBovine View Post
    Some children are intolerant to salicylates in fruit. That is what will make them hyperactive NOT sugar.

    Cakes (bought not homemade) / lollies/ soft drinks are all full of artificial colours preservatives. The colours and preservatives found in party foods can affect the behaviour of some children NOT the sugar.

    More info on this website:
    Failsfe diet - http://fedup.com.au/

    The failsafe diet is essentially an elimination diet to determine food intollerances recommended by the RPA allergy unit based on their research.

    http://www.sswahs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/all...l/ffintro.html

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  17. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpicyTurtle View Post
    The point of organic is not that is tastes better or contains more nutrients, but that most mass produced fruit and veg are sprayed with synthetic pesticides, so by buying organic you are avoiding eating the residue which has been proven to be found on non-organic produce.
    Whether or not you think that's worth paying for is another matter though. The levels of residue found on ANY produce is generally a long way under the levels considered safe. Now, perhaps you don't trust that assessment of 'safe'. If you do though, it doesn't make a lot of sense to pay a lot more for something which is still considered safe.

    Also, that's the point to YOU. There are plenty of people who argue that organic food contains higher levels of nutrients etc., but this is not backed up by the science.

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