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  1. #1
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    Default Not sure how to title this. Parents with children NQR at school

    I feel like every child, every friends child, every family members child is doing fine, coping well in prep or school in general. Except mine
    If you've read my previous threads or posts you'll know what I mean.
    He's a gorgeous, lovely boy. Just not doing so well socially therefore very disruptive during mat/carpet time, hitting, punching, kicking. It's not malice, it's hard to explain. He has trouble joining in play and dealing with conflict.
    Also he's not concentrating or listening to instructions and struggling with fine motor skills.
    We're seeing a psych soon.

    I haven't told my family, or mum or MIL. Just Dh. (I've lightly mentioned a few things to mum etc and they say it's just him settling in etc)
    But I know it's more to that.

    I just feel so alone.

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    My son is a lot like this too you aren't alone we have seen a behavioral therapist who has ruled out anything major but recognizes that he is prone to sensory overload.

    We use a lot of 'heavy work' to help him release energy and I talk through his behavior trying to translate for him I guess. So that he and others around him CAn understand where he's coming from. If he wants to be left alone he might just roar and prowl the edges of a room. That can be really scary for other kids.

    Being social is very tiring for him, he can be very confident but it's just tiring and after a long day he's prone to meltdowns.

    He has started kindy this year and his teacher is great she's putting a lot of effort into understanding him. He's never going to be the kid who sits still. It's really hard work sometimes as a mum to see other kids doing something so simple what you know your child can't.

    I think talking to a professional will be great for you and your son. Ive gained so much from it I just want to be the best parent for him and that doesn't always mean following traditional methods or disciplines. For example we do time outs but at times I can see that he is under stress and needs time in and we just sit quietly next to each other for a while instead.

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    How old is he OP?

  4. #4
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    5.5 years
    Prep

    Thanks for replying.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louy View Post
    My son is a lot like this too you aren't alone we have seen a behavioral therapist who has ruled out anything major but recognizes that he is prone to sensory overload.

    We use a lot of 'heavy work' to help him release energy and I talk through his behavior trying to translate for him I guess. So that he and others around him CAn understand where he's coming from. If he wants to be left alone he might just roar and prowl the edges of a room. That can be really scary for other kids.

    Being social is very tiring for him, he can be very confident but it's just tiring and after a long day he's prone to meltdowns.

    He has started kindy this year and his teacher is great she's putting a lot of effort into understanding him. He's never going to be the kid who sits still. It's really hard work sometimes as a mum to see other kids doing something so simple what you know your child can't.

    I think talking to a professional will be great for you and your son. Ive gained so much from it I just want to be the best parent for him and that doesn't always mean following traditional methods or disciplines. For example we do time outs but at times I can see that he is under stress and needs time in and we just sit quietly next to each other for a while instead.
    What do you mean by heavy work?

    Also is your son fussy about certain clothes? My son won't wear pants with buttons, shirts with buttons or clothes too long/big. It took ages to pick a pair of runners he likes. He hates thongs. His socks have to feel comfortable too.

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    I have no advice only accolades that you are using your intuition and saying 'somethings not quite right'. Keep on going till you fond some answers. You are obviously tuned in to your little man and are not happy/comfortable with the response. I'm having a different experience but I know deep down that 'things aren't right'. I took the last 2.5 months off work to be with ds and i'm starting to get it. Not completely there but I am hearing things now that make a lot of sense. Don't give up. Intuition is an amazing skill that every mama has but it needs to be utilised. Good on you mum!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    What do you mean by heavy work?

    Also is your son fussy about certain clothes? My son won't wear pants with buttons, shirts with buttons or clothes too long/big. It took ages to pick a pair of runners he likes. He hates thongs. His socks have to feel comfortable too.
    https://psychmamma.wordpress.com/201...sing-disorder/

    This link is a good explanation of it.

    No my son isn't fussy about clothes but I have heard of that being a sensory thing.

    DS is fussy about routines and likes to know what is coming next otherwise he's very resistant.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louy View Post
    https://psychmamma.wordpress.com/201...sing-disorder/

    This link is a good explanation of it.

    No my son isn't fussy about clothes but I have heard of that being a sensory thing.

    DS is fussy about routines and likes to know what is coming next otherwise he's very resistant.
    Thanks.
    A lot of these activities he already happily does (ride bike, Jump on trampoline, play play dough etc)

  9. #9
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    @2BlueBirds my DS is exactly the same in regards to clothing and shoes and even socks.
    He hates loud noises as well. They are all sensory issues.
    I'm glad you've got the psych booked in. I hope you make some progress with things soon.

  10. #10
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    From memory you were getting him assessed for ASD. Sounds like he may be on the spectrum. Would help a lot to understand his world if you get a diagnosis. Xxx


 

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