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  1. #11
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    When you say mild do you mean high functioning? My DS is very high functioning and has a moderate ASD diagnosis. I guess the signs were in relation to his behavioural and social development and things ASD kids often have like sensory issues, low muscle tone, poor coordination.
    Language wise there are no real issues, toileting we achieved a bit later but again with no real issues. Starting school was an absolute nightmare and has been ever since. He has not coped at all and is always branded the bad child. The school made absolutely no provisions for DS until I started complaining to the education department regularly. They neglected to seek funding he was eligible as well which is infuriating. Discrimination is rife and is generally accepted by everyone in education. I was personally threatened in regards to keeping my DS at his current school and even the education department had no problem with that. So I guess just be ready to fight constantly for your child. It's an absolutely exhausting nightmare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigZ View Post
    We have seen a paed, it just feels like it's a really long process, she referred us to a psychologist and occupational therapist but it's still another month before we see them. He will have been at kinder for a few weeks before we see them.
    It took us.. err 2yrs to get DS1 diagnosed because he was borderline. He exhibited typical autistic behaviors, but then sometimes he didn't. We saw 3 different speechies, 2 psychs, 1 O.T, 2 PaeD's, they all said they 'think' he is. But it wasn't until our 2nd PaeD after a couple of sessions was comfortable to say that it was, what it was. Sometimes the elements to the diagnosis takes time to reveal themselves.
    With DS2, we just went straight to the PaeD and he was diagnosed straight away, mainly because Ds2's symptoms are alot more evident.

    And sometimes you do need to get 2nd opinons.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by HarvestMoon View Post
    When you say mild do you mean high functioning? My DS is very high functioning and has a moderate ASD diagnosis. I guess the signs were in relation to his behavioural and social development and things ASD kids often have like sensory issues, low muscle tone, poor coordination.
    Language wise there are no real issues, toileting we achieved a bit later but again with no real issues. Starting school was an absolute nightmare and has been ever since. He has not coped at all and is always branded the bad child. The school made absolutely no provisions for DS until I started complaining to the education department regularly. They neglected to seek funding he was eligible as well which is infuriating. Discrimination is rife and is generally accepted by everyone in education. I was personally threatened in regards to keeping my DS at his current school and even the education department had no problem with that. So I guess just be ready to fight constantly for your child. It's an absolutely exhausting nightmare.
    This makes me so sad - I am so sorry for your experience. I have taught a number of children with autism in main****** schools (generally because I put my hand up) and I love the diversity it brings to the classroom and the way the other children learn to be understanding of how people process the world in a different way to themselves. I think they are trying to get more trained special needs positions across the public school systems and hopefully this will bring more understanding where it is currently lacking and prevent situations like you have experienced...

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    Also potting training Ds1.. Err it took us a year. Back and forth from undies to nappies to undies. But in the end we got a visual board made up with simple steps. Showing pictures of what to do.
    "Pull pants and undies down" "sit on toilet" "wipe bottom" "stand up" "pull pants" "flush toilet"
    Sometimes the visuals were enough to get him motivated to go, cause every time he succeeded a step, he got to put the picture in the finish box. If it wore off, a treat was rewarded after every time he went.
    If he is fighting to go on the toilet, and screams, he is not ready. With DS1 we actually just asked IF he wanted to go, we never said he had to go, because he would fight that more.
    He now goes on his own just fine during the day, no accidents anymore. We are still working on night time training.

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    I kind of went though this process with DS. He had a profound speech delay - by the age of 3 he had a vocab of about 15 words and some of those were only partial words. He also would not seek or maintain eye contact with people he spoke to. The only thing that got his attention was Wiggles dvds (yah for Wiggles!!) however, when we took him to a concert he was overwhelmed and would sin on his chair with his feet up and his hands over his ears. Over the years we went to 6 Wiggles concert and 2 playschool concerts to see if he had improved but nope. The GP thought he might be ASD so set the wheels in motion to get assessments. He was assessed by an OT, child psychologist and every 6 months by a paed. This also gave us over a year of public funded speech therapy (ie, until he started school) and 5 x subsidised private speech therapy sessions per year. We chose to delay his start into school so he spent his pre-prep year doing fortnightly speech therapy sessions and at times both with a public speech therapist and private speech therapist.

    Anyway, I'm babbling, it all worked out really well and ASD has since been ruled out because he has transitioned really well into school. The speech therapy worked a treat - the trick is now how to get him to stop talking!!!

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    OP, I think your concerns are valid enough to proceed with perusing a diagnosis. You are doing the right thing.

    Your opening post describes very similar behaviour to my DS, who has recently been diagnosed with moderate ASD. He is almost 4.

    Not long after he turned 3 we started to consider he *may* be on the spectrum. It took months to see a paed and by the time we had our appointment it was so much more obvious to us that he was not a neurotypical child.

    Some of my DS's traits include:

    - struggling to engage and sit still
    - language delay. He knows what everything is, talks clearly, but doesn't engage in conversations.
    - repeats things off tv word for word (echolalia)
    - becomes fixated on items
    - sensory issues (eats limited foods, can't handle having his hair cut and dislikes anything on his head)
    - unusual movements (sometimes appears to be grooving to non-existent music)
    - doesn't ask questions

    Good luck with your appointments.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    zoz  (25-01-2015)

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    My DS has just turned 2, he doesn't yet say any words or doesn't walk yet. He sees a bunch of specialists, physio, occupational and speech plus goes to a couple of different groups for sn.

    I'm dreading potty training to be honest.

    We aren't so sure about ASD yet, only yime can tell I guess. Your little boy is a bit older so I guess you'll have a better knowledge if he has got it.

    He has got troubles with hearing, he's just had grommets which in time can tell if has made much difference.

    I hope you find answers. I know it can be daunting and a long road. It's the not knowing what exactly is wrong which is frustrating and always wondering different things and having different worries about your little one which can be draining. Divinative answers would be a great weight lifted. Good luck, but you are doing everything right by the sounds. x

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    Quote Originally Posted by [Mod] Degrassi View Post
    OP, I think your concerns are valid enough to proceed with perusing a diagnosis. You are doing the right thing.

    Your opening post describes very similar behaviour to my DS, who has recently been diagnosed with moderate ASD. He is almost 4.

    Not long after he turned 3 we started to consider he *may* be on the spectrum. It took months to see a paed and by the time we had our appointment it was so much more obvious to us that he was not a neurotypical child.

    Some of my DS's traits include:

    - struggling to engage and sit still
    - language delay. He knows what everything is, talks clearly, but doesn't engage in conversations.
    - repeats things off tv word for word (echolalia)
    - becomes fixated on items
    - sensory issues (eats limited foods, can't handle having his hair cut and dislikes anything on his head)
    - unusual movements (sometimes appears to be grooving to non-existent music)
    - doesn't ask questions

    Good luck with your appointments.
    Wow the can't stand anything on the head, my DS hates anything on his head he goes bezerk. I didn't know that was a trait. My DS also head bangs really bad against his cot bars to the point he has a bruised patch. I put pool noodles with just one side cut and slotted it onto his cot so he can't hurt himself when banging.

    Good to get more insight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zoz View Post
    Wow the can't stand anything on the head, my DS hates anything on his head he goes bezerk. I didn't know that was a trait. My DS also head bangs really bad against his cot bars to the point he has a bruised patch. I put pool noodles with just one side cut and slotted it onto his cot so he can't hurt himself when banging.

    Good to get more insight.
    Hair cuts can be a nightmare.
    Some kids really hate hats or in some cases sprinkling of water.

    DS1 used to headbutt and push people. For him it was a sensory need for deep pressure. So the heavy sensation on ones shoulders. When he was anxious it used to happen a lot.
    We ended up making him wear a heavy bag everywhere he went. Push things around like prams and trolleys. The heavy sensation helped those urges to headbutt. And it also helped him concentrate better and sit down to activities. It worked out well on Kinder days. We would walk to Kinder. Him carrying his backpack. And when he arrived his teacher had an art and craft activity waiting for him. After it wore off she had outside activities for him ready to wear him down.

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    Weighted vests, lap toys or lap sash and blankets can be a god send.
    They are super expensive but super easy to make. A friend made d's a cot sized one for his birthday. It cost her under $10 to make using scrap material. To buy the same thing online is between Sorry $80 to $100


 

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