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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by [Mod] Degrassi View Post
    He does sound like he's behind where he should be for his age. I would suggest having him assessed by a speech therapist. Perhaps a visit to your GP to see if they can refer you on to a paediatrician also.

    Even if there are no other developmental issues of concern, he will benefit from some speech therapy.

    Many people have stories about their late talkers suddenly exploding with language, which is encouraging to hear when your own child is a bit behind, but it can also give others false hope.

    I am speaking from the perspective of a parent of a child who had a speech delay and now at almost 4 still has a language delay (expressive and receptive). As it turns out, my DS has autism.
    I totally agree with this. So well written @[Mod] Degrassi

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  3. #12
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    Hey thought I would jump on this thread. My son will be 2 in a couple of weeks and still has no words. He had grommets put in 3 weeks ago and he seems to be babbling more but still thinks he has hearing issues as he seems to lip read a lot. The specialist says that he should have about 50 words and stringing 2 together at this point, so he is way behind.
    @Nafsika I've heard that multi-language children do take longer to speak so maybe that's it?
    @[Mod] Degrassi if you don't mind me asking, what things is your DS doing/not doing to be diagnosed with autism? And at what age? We have been taking part in an autism study as he is 'at risk' however his paediatrician and GP both seem to think he just has a language delay

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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL1009 View Post
    Hey thought I would jump on this thread. My son will be 2 in a couple of weeks and still has no words. He had grommets put in 3 weeks ago and he seems to be babbling more but still thinks he has hearing issues as he seems to lip read a lot. The specialist says that he should have about 50 words and stringing 2 together at this point, so he is way behind.
    @Nafsika I've heard that multi-language children do take longer to speak so maybe that's it?
    @[Mod] Degrassi if you don't mind me asking, what things is your DS doing/not doing to be diagnosed with autism? And at what age? We have been taking part in an autism study as he is 'at risk' however his paediatrician and GP both seem to think he just has a language delay
    My son has Greeks and English apps so he chooses to pick words, he can sing songs (not fully) in both languages. More Greek though.

    It is hard, but since posting his talking a bit more. I was afraid he had issues but his fine. His not I to books big, story books but he likes picture books.

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    My son is bilingual too, we speak one language at home and he goes full time to childcare in English.

    He started to put 2 words together around 20 mo.

    I was told that bilingual children develops their speaking skills at the same rhythm than other kids but theirs words are split between languages.

    A sole english speaker kid would have 50 words in English by 18mo whereas a bilingual would have 25 in each so they might seem a little behind. (I took 50 as an example by the way!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by ExcuseMyFrench View Post
    I was told that bilingual children develops their speaking skills at the same rhythm than other kids but theirs words are split between languages.

    A sole english speaker kid would have 50 words in English by 18mo whereas a bilingual would have 25 in each so they might seem a little behind. (I took 50 as an example by the way!)



    This is pretty accurate we have friends with a 3 yo. They speak French and English (father) and Russian and English (mother).

    He did not speak very much at all, a bit like OP described, until about 2.5/3.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SL1009 View Post
    @[Mod] Degrassi if you don't mind me asking, what things is your DS doing/not doing to be diagnosed with autism? And at what age? We have been taking part in an autism study as he is 'at risk' however his paediatrician and GP both seem to think he just has a language delay
    I don't mind you asking at all

    My DS wasn't officially diagnosed until November last year, but we started suspecting he had ASD not long after he turned 3 (he just turned 4 this month).

    He has a lot of traits, but I'll just list a few: echolalia (repeats ads and phrases from television and the ipad word for word), is constantly moving and finds it very difficult to sit still, doesn't ask questions and rarely answers questions, doesn't cope well with sudden changes (needs reassurance of what is happening, what comes next), difficulty engaging in activities not of his choice, becomes fixated on items, doesn't greet people with hello or goodbye.

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    If you are concerned, speak with a GP. However, bilingual kids do, usually, take a bit longer.

    DSS was just lazy- he had the words but refused to use them until he was 2.5 years old. He would say single words, but not sentences. So, we started ignoring his one-word questions/commands and saying, "we don't understand what you want, tell us"... after a month or so, he started talking fully, and hasn't stopped since!

    DSD was average, usual words by 1, and chatting away from 1.5 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SL1009 View Post
    Hey thought I would jump on this thread. My son will be 2 in a couple of weeks and still has no words. He had grommets put in 3 weeks ago and he seems to be babbling more but still thinks he has hearing issues as he seems to lip read a lot. The specialist says that he should have about 50 words and stringing 2 together at this point, so he is way behind.
    @Nafsika I've heard that multi-language children do take longer to speak so maybe that's it?
    @[Mod] Degrassi if you don't mind me asking, what things is your DS doing/not doing to be diagnosed with autism? And at what age? We have been taking part in an autism study as he is 'at risk' however his paediatrician and GP both seem to think he just has a language delay
    My DD had grommets put in for the first time when she was about 18mths old. It took a little time for her language to start developing (but, like your little one she started babbling more pretty quickly). She ended up starting to put two words together just after her 2nd birthday. As soon as the grommets were in and she had the all clear for her hearing (i.e. a follow up hearing assessment) I organised a speech pathology assessment. It was great to get a baseline of where she was at and some tips for getting her talking. We then had follow ups regularly to make sure she was on track. She was eligible for an enhanced care plan through the GP (I think the name of this has now changed) for 5 rebated speech sessions a year. She hasn't needed speech therapy for her basic language development, but continues to see a therapist for a stutter, and will probably need some articulation help too down the track.

    I would definitely recommend seeing a speech therapist and getting an expert assessment/opinion. We chose the private system as the wait for public in our area was too long (about 6 months). It can get expensive though if they do need regular therapy.

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SL1009 View Post
    Hey thought I would jump on this thread. My son will be 2 in a couple of weeks and still has no words. He had grommets put in 3 weeks ago and he seems to be babbling more but still thinks he has hearing issues as he seems to lip read a lot. The specialist says that he should have about 50 words and stringing 2 together at this point, so he is way behind.
    We are in a very similar position. My son is 21 months old and still only says clearly Mum, Dad, Car, Hayden and Mikayla. He had grommets in and adenoids out 3 months ago and he babbles a LOT more and sings along to songs and stuff now, but not actually pronouncing the words clearly just mimicking the sound... well... not even the sound so much as the pitch or tone of the sound.

    I've been toying with the idea of speech therapy but I'm just not sure yet. He is at daycare 3 days per week and is in the toddler room this year, and I'm hoping he starts coming along in leaps and bounds in the next few months following the lead of his peers. If he's still this behind in a few months time I will probably consider it further.

  15. #20
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    We have always had DS at home but our GP and Paediatrician both said daycare would help him immensely. We've had him in occasional care for 5-6 hours a week for 2 weeks now. I've noticed already that he's learnt to bring his feet forward to sit down and come down the slide, rather than go down on his front, something I was trying to teach him. I think it will be great for his development. He's starting pre-kinder 2 days a week just after his 2nd birthday and will be in a room with 2.5-3.5yr olds so I'm hoping he will learn from the older ones. I'm currently taking him to group speech therapy sessions every week and am on the wait list for public speech therapy but will pay privately if we need to; we're going to see how he goes over the new couple of months. We have a feeling that the grommets haven't done too much to help his hearing and find that he is still lip reading but we're having a follow up on Thursday so we'll see what the specialist says. In the next month or so he will be going for his 2yr old autism study assessment so will be interesting to see what they say this time round


 

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