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  1. #1
    Witwicky's Avatar
    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Default Do you know...

    ...the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes?

    Do you know what causes them? Can they be prevented?

    Would you be judgemental if you saw a young child sculling a can of softdrink or juice?

    World Diabetes Day is coming up, on 14 November. What do you know about Diabetes?

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    I thought Type 1 you're born with or just get, where Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors.

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    I think...

    Type 1 is insulin dependant. Its diagnosed Young as its genetic. It's an autoimmune disease where the pancreas no longer functions.

    Type 2 diabetes Is where the pancreas still produced some insulin. It can be caused by genetic and environmental factors (diet, exercise etc)

    i don't judge parents when I see their kids sculling soft drink and juice. However, it does baffle me as to why you would give kids those drinks at a young age.

    The symptoms are frequent urination and itchy legs.

    ETA: you cannot prevent type 1 but you can lesson the likelihood of developing type 2 through leading a healthy lifestyle. I think some people have a genetic predisposition to it which increased their chances. But I could be wrong!
    Last edited by cheekychook; 09-11-2014 at 00:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheekychook View Post
    I think...

    Type 1 is insulin dependant. Its diagnosed Young as its genetic. It's an autoimmune disease where the pancreas no longer functions.

    Type 2 diabetes Is where the pancreas still produced some insulin. It can be caused by genetic and environmental factors (diet, exercise etc)

    i don't judge parents when I see their kids sculling soft drink and juice. However, it does baffle me as to why you would give kids those drinks at a young age.

    The symptoms are frequent urination and itchy legs.

    ETA: you cannot prevent type 1 but you can lesson the likelihood of developing type 2 through leading a healthy lifestyle. I think some people have a genetic predisposition to it which increased their chances. But I could be wrong!
    Pretty much exactly this!

    Although I was actually discussing diabetes with dh today. My friend's 6 yr old step daughter has just been diagnosed type 1. Anyone know the answers to these questions?

    1) does type 1 diabetes in a female cause pregnancy complications? Can pregnancy make the diabetic ill?
    2) is there a link between diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barnaby View Post
    Pretty much exactly this!

    Although I was actually discussing diabetes with dh today. My friend's 6 yr old step daughter has just been diagnosed type 1. Anyone know the answers to these questions?

    1) does type 1 diabetes in a female cause pregnancy complications? Can pregnancy make the diabetic ill?
    2) is there a link between diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac?
    my mum and sister are both type 1 diabetics. T1D can cause a lot of pregnancy complications, it puts pressure on the kidneys and can be quite dangerous. A lot of female T1D's dont have more than 1 or 2 children.

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    Subbing as I want to learn more about it.

    Also does anyone know what insulin resistance is? I have heard of it before but don't really know much about it.

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    Witwicky's Avatar
    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Type 1 is an autoimmune disease. Type 1's produce no insulin (or very little), because the cells in the pancreas have been destroyed, so they require insulin on a daily basis. This can be delivered in the form of injections or an insulin pump.

    Type 1 cannot be prevented and the cause is unknown, although it's believed that a genetic link exists. It's often referred to as 'juvenile diabetes' because people are generally diagnosed in childhood, but it can present in adults as well. It can also present in infants.

    It is NOT the result of eating too much sugar.

    Type 1 is a daily balancing act between low and high blood glucose levels (BGL). If they are too low, the person has hypoglacemia and urgently needs to eat or drink some fast acting carbs (jelly beans, juice, etc) - hence my comment about a child drinking juice or soft drink. I have had a stranger tut-tut at me because my very young child was sculling juice in a shopping centre once due to a hypo.

    Not treating a hypo can result in a coma and death. A person who is hypo may be shaking or trembling, and might feel dizzy, weak, and disorientated. They might have a change in behaviour and appear drunk or even angry/irritable. A hypo T1 child might be crying, screaming or throwing an epic tantrum. Alternatively, they might look really spaced out.

    If the person's BGL is too high, they are hyperglycaemic and require extra insulin. Not treating this can cause serious complications and death. Having frequently high BGL's affects almost every part of the body and leads to a myriad of health complications.

    ***

    Type 2 is the most common type, and generally the one you hear most about in the media etc. It's caused by both lifestyle and genetic factors. Type 2's still produce insulin, but the body doesn't use it effectively. You can develop Type 2 at any age, but it's more likely to occur in adults.

    Type 2 is treated with both healthy diet and frequent exercise, however T2's may also require tablets or insulin injections.

    Both diseases require regular daily finger pricks to check blood glucose.

    Symptoms to look out for (both types):

    - Frequent urination
    - Excessive thirst
    - Fatigue
    - Always hungry
    - Headaches
    - Dizziness
    - Blurred vision
    - Mood changes

    A person with undiagnosed Type 1 might experience sudden weight loss, vomiting, nausea, stomach pains, and might have acetone breath. Never, ever ignore those symptoms. They are signs of a very serious and fatal complication called Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barnaby View Post
    Pretty much exactly this!

    Although I was actually discussing diabetes with dh today. My friend's 6 yr old step daughter has just been diagnosed type 1. Anyone know the answers to these questions?

    1) does type 1 diabetes in a female cause pregnancy complications? Can pregnancy make the diabetic ill?
    2) is there a link between diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac?
    Number one was answered, so I'll reply to question 2.

    Yes, a link exists. You are more likely to develop an autoimmune disease if you already have one. Likewise, if there are autoimmune diseases in the family. The link between coeliac disease and T1 is so strong that T1's will generally get checked annually for coeliac at their diabetic clinic.

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    @Witwicky thanks for starting this thread. I think you've provided some great information here.

    I just wanted to add that though type 1 often appears in childhood it can develop at any age. My brother and father both have type 1 diabetes. My brother was diagnosed at age 3 whereas my father first developed symptoms at 42 years of age. A lot of people seem to assume that adults who develop diabetes must have type 2.

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    My girlfriends daughter developed type 1 at age 4 ( now 21) and my MIL is also type 1 ( diagnosed at 40) both only discovered this when they both went into diabetic comas! My mum is technically type 2 ( diagnosed 6 years ago) but with diet and a eating plan has had normal sugars for the last 4 years ( but still had to check sugar levels regularly )


    My girls friends daughter has been in a few clinical trials ( one on autoimmune diseases and diabetes ) she is so a celiac and allergic to peanuts- I don't know any outcomes of these yet but will try find out more - she had been told being pregnant will be very challenging


    Insulin resistance is when the body becomes resistant to insulin - we are concerned about this with my MIL as she still eats quite badly for a diabetic and just gives herself extra insulin to combats this !

    I get tested every 2 years as my grandmother and 1 aunt are type 1 and 2 other aunts are type 2 - thankfully so far my sugars are perfect but yes I do worry it is genetic and am overly cautious with DS food - diabetes is definitely increasing and I honestly think our food choices have the most impact


 

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