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  1. #81
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    This won't ever become law in the UK. Nor should it. I fail to see why we should legislate to cater to the lowest common denominator. People who drink 8 bourbons each night are hardly comparable to those who have an occasional glass of red when pregnant. It's just a sensationalist article which gets posted on social media in order to rile up the mummy brigade.

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    Atropos  (09-11-2014),ExcuseMyFrench  (08-11-2014),Little Miss Sunshine  (08-11-2014),Sonja  (08-11-2014)

  3. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I do actually agree with this. My issue with by banning it is we are putting the alcoholic mother who is doing her child damage and the responsible mother who has a little glass of champers at a wedding in the same basket. They aren't.

    And where do we draw the line? Should we ban drinking for bfing mothers? We know alcohol goes through the milk. Yet a vast majority of forum users in the past have said having a few drinks while bfing is fine.
    Yeah... more research is needed and lines drawn before a law like this could work. I am glad it is being raised as an issue though even though they aren't going about it in the best way. And I bet pregnant women/breastfeeders would just stop altogether if it was illegal, because most of them are responsible.

    Of course it doesn't stop addicts, disadvantaged people etc but once something is illegal, people just treat it with more respect and do something about it so why not I say good first step.

    Lots of ppl also saying why not ban smoking too. I agree. In fact there's more proof even in small doses of its toxicity.

  4. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    But what about parents who expose their kids to second hand cigarette smoke? When I worked in a pharmacy when I was younger we had one family with 4 kids who were all seriously compromised with lung related illnesses yet their parents chain smoked. I'd watch them walk out of the pharmacy and straight into their car, light up with 4 kids inside and all the windows up. The kids were all asthmatic and the cost of medication and hospital visits would have been enormous.

    I do get what people are saying who agree with this. I just think there are so many things parents do that could warrant culpability.
    Smoking in the car with kids is now illegal in some parts of Australia - as it should be

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    You're missing my point.

    What is the consequence of smoking in a car with children?

    And what about parents who smoke at home with their kids?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    I fail to see why we should legislate to cater to the lowest common denominator. People who drink 8 bourbons each night are hardly comparable to those who have an occasional glass of red when pregnant.
    ... Huh?... There's no need for the highest common denominator to be affected by a well crafted law that specifically targets the lowest common denominator who get absolutely blotto while pregnant...

  7. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    You're missing my point.

    What is the consequence of smoking in a car with children?

    And what about parents who smoke at home with their kids?
    What is your point? Parents that smoke at home with their kids.... Well if they smoke inside I think that should be legislated against too. However for now I am happy with a ban on smoking in the car with kids

  8. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    ... Huh?... There's no need for the highest common denominator to be affected by a well crafted law that specifically targets the lowest common denominator who get absolutely blotto while pregnant...
    My understanding is that the discussion of this thread is about a hypothetical complete ban on drinking while pregnant, not a limit on how much you drink? If it's a total ban, then it would be catering to the lowest common denominator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    My understanding is that the discussion of this thread is about a hypothetical complete ban on drinking while pregnant, not a limit on how much you drink? If it's a total ban, then it would be catering to the lowest common denominator.
    Yeah... I've moved on from the initial discussion to what I would do when I am PM

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post

    Any issues should be dealt with from a child protection basis. Banning alcohol for pg women is punitive and infantilises the 90% that have 1-2 drinks the whole 9 months. I'm 20 weeks pg. Haven't had a single drink. I'm a big girl though. If I want a weak shandy with the heat coming on, I will.
    I agree.

    And furthermore, one of the things with this subject that really gets on my nerves is when I hear other people say "If you can't go without a drink for 9 months you've got a problem". I would struggle to go without chocolate or bread for 9 months. Do I have a problem with chocolate or bread? Maybe, lol. But my point is: don't write people off as having a problem with alcohol just because they crave the occasional, small drink when pregnant!! No one should be criminalised for that. It's a very different thing to getting wasted day in day out.

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  12. #90
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    My point is that parents who smoke in a car with kids cop a fine. The kids? Well they could cop severe lung and breathing damage. But you don't send the parents to jail nor provide compensation for the child for ongoing health problems (which is what I understand you're suggesting for mothers of FAS babies).

    And what about dads who take drugs and f--k up their sperm and then produce babies this disabilities. shall we fine them too? If not why not? Why single out mothers?

    I used to see it all the time in ivf threads. The mum to be was living like a saint while the dad to be partied and carried on like usual. They knew they were TTC. What's the difference?


 

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