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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    If a pregnant woman gets blotto then I think she should damn well be held criminally liable for any damage to the baby. I have an acquaintance that used to drink heavy liquor when pregggers and her child has a range of problems ... Is an absolute handfull with shocking behavioral issues. It's a case of she is now reaping what she has sewed but that poor kid didn't ask for that life.

    As for one or two standard sized drinks every now and then. I wouldn't do it but I also wouldn't send in the police on that one.

    It would be a hard thing to police bit I don't think that should deter any law from being implemented. At the least if a doctor says a baby has fetal alcohol syndrome then rah should be enough to go on. It doesn't need to be a slippery slope if the legislation is drafted correctly.
    I agree that FAS is completely heartbreaking and a tragedy that is largely avoidable (although some women haven't known they were pregnant at the time of consuming alcohol heavily and this adds another difficult element to policing it). Just wondering, what do you think an appropriate punishment would be? Are you thinking jail time? Because this adds another element of suffering to the child who will likely think it's their fault.

    I'm not stirring, just wondering what you think an appropriate consequence would be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I agree that FAS is completely heartbreaking and a tragedy that is largely avoidable (although some women haven't known they were pregnant at the time of consuming alcohol heavily and this adds another difficult element to policing it). Just wondering, what do you think an appropriate punishment would be? Are you thinking jail time? Because this adds another element of suffering to the child who will likely think it's their fault.

    I'm not stirring, just wondering what you think an appropriate consequence would be.
    Not to mention the mother now having a criminal record so practically unemployable condemning her baby to a life of poverty/welfare

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I agree that FAS is completely heartbreaking and a tragedy that is largely avoidable (although some women haven't known they were pregnant at the time of consuming alcohol heavily and this adds another difficult element to policing it). Just wondering, what do you think an appropriate punishment would be? Are you thinking jail time? Because this adds another element of suffering to the child who will likely think it's their fault.

    I'm not stirring, just wondering what you think an appropriate consequence would be.
    Yeah jail time. Even if only weekend detention. Or house arrest? There is no excuse for wrecklessly endangering your kid and damning them to a life of ill health and poverty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Miss Sunshine View Post
    Not to mention the mother now having a criminal record so practically unemployable condemning her baby to a life of poverty/welfare
    I don't get this. Parents break the law all the time and have to deal with the consequences. You don't get a free pass to be a horrible person just because your crime relates to alcohol and a baby.

    If there is a stand up father in the picture it doesn't have to mean doom and gloom for the child.... And Depending on the mothers situation perhaps in some cases it might be best if she doesn't have full custody.

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    nobody else has brought up antenatal depression. what is worse, a woman killing herself and her baby or having a few drinks to try to get past the depression?

    I pity all women in this situatiion and yet anti abortion regulations are high, women are getting less rights and are more condemed to having to justify themselves.

    i don't drink BUT i have tried to talk to doctors about being more then a little upset about my baby and yet i have been told eat more magnesium. if i was suicidal, how would that translate?

    hugs to all the women doing it tough

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    Sorry but I don't get how people will police it.

    What about the people who don't find out they are pregnant until very far along because they weren't trying etc! Like the stories you hear of mums giving birth full term and still 'partied' whole way through. Just an example!

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Yeah jail time. Even if only weekend detention. Or house arrest? There is no excuse for wrecklessly endangering your kid and damning them to a life of ill health and poverty.
    I do see where you are coming from, and I do agree to a certain extent. But I don't agree that it should be dealt with as a criminal matter. A lot of the time, when someone is struggling with substance abuse issues, there are usually deeper mental issues at play in some way or another. It's all well and good to say "chuck them in jail", but that doesn't really resolve the deeper issues. Also, if it is dealt with as a criminal offense, it could mean that pregnant women who are struggling with an addiction and actually wanting help to overcome it might either avoid to seek the help that they need for fear of repercussions, or avoid antenatal care altogether.

    Making something illegal won't stop those who have an addiction, it just limits their access to support services and practically forces them to partake in their addiction in private. Which is possibly more dangerous to the unborn child, as it makes it more difficult to moniter and intervene.

  13. #29
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    I also don't think it's as simple as dismissing a woman that does this as a 'horrible person'. I guess I just favour a preventative approach to a punitive one in most situations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    Great idea!! We should do that with drugs as well, make them illegal and no one will take them. Oh, wait...

    Why is society so eager to police women's bodies? The vast majority of us manage to provide a healthy womb for our unborn babies.

    Drinking alcohol including excessive/binge drinking is normalised in this country (and equally in the UK for that matter) - how about we take steps to 'de-normalise' it?

    It's predominantly men who cause grief from drunken violence/anti-social behaviour and drink-driving but why aren't we considering legislating against men drinking??? How many assaults and car accidents would be prevented if men between 18-35 couldn't drink alcohol?
    Assault and drink-driving are already illegal.

    Regarding women's right to bodily autonomy, what about the unborn child's right to bodily autonomy?


 

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