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    Default Stuttering.... When to worry?

    Hi everyone. For a while now 3 year old DS2 has been stuttering, as an example he'll say "mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, come and have a look", or "I, I, I, I, I, I, I can do...."
    He doesn't do it all the time and it's worse when he's excited.
    So my main question is.... Should I get him looked at by a speech therapist?


    Has anyone else dealt with stuttering? What can they do to help?

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    Sorry, that's meant to be Stuttering in the title.

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    My DD does this when she is excited, or when she wants to get my attention but can't think of anything worthwhile to say so she just says "I, I, I, I, I, I, I...." until she can think of something to say. I'm not at all worried. I would be concerned if it was something she did often or just in normal dialogue, but it's only when she is excited or being silly. If your DS does it a lot and just in average conversations then maybe it's worth getting checked out. But otherwise I wouldn't worry!

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    My son used to do this around 2/3. My friend is a speech therapist and she told me not to worry about it that it simply their brain working faster than their mouth can talk and it will eventually catch up. It is more common in children who are quite good talkers too. He grew out of it in a few months.

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    @lilypily here's a thread for you!

    My nephew does it, it comes and goes. Incredibly bad for a few weeks then completely gone. I think his is stress related.

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    It's very common ....my DS did the same thing we use to get him to stop slow down what he was saying and start again...it worked over time he got better and eventually he stopped altogether.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    We've just gone through speech therapy for my 3 and a half year for stuttering. We had two sessions and he doesn't do it anymore.

    There are a few indicators that it may be more than just excitement. Did anyone else in your family stutter? when does he do it?

    There's a fine line between normal stuttering that they grow out of and intervention. I knew for us having a couple of sessions would be helpful for DS as he was getting extremely frustrated.

    ETA what @purpleflowers said is right. Just ask him to stop and say the sentence again. Not every time as they get sick of repeating themselves.

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    My son did this at the age of 3. We started speech therapy asap and learned to combat the dyspraxia with saying things like " stop, bumpy words, start again" and a lot of other techniques. When he turned 4 everything had clicked into place and he stopped stuttering. There is a genetic component with speech problems and our second son is in speech therapy too for similar issues, I started speech therapy at 2 with him as knew there would be issues. If in doubt have a speech therapy report and assessment done. I strongly advise it as its better to get on top of it earlier than later when they become embarrassed about it.

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    I am a speech pathologist

    What you're describing sounds like normal or developmental dysfluency.

    Basically, there are two types of stutters: a true stutter and developmental.

    A developmental stutter is generally characterised by word repetitions at the start of a sentence or at a con joining conjunction (and, but etc). The child starts talking, they know if they don't start talking, someone is going to talk over them or they are just so excited they need to get it out, now!
    But they haven't quite figured out the structure of the whole sentence so they hold their place in the conversation until they have. It usually coincides with a leap in language development.

    A true stutter is more likely to have those word, and part word, repetitions scattered throughout a sentence. They may also have prolongations (it's not fair Mmmmmmum ... Not to be confused with typical child emphasis/whining) and/or blocking (hard to explain but basically like the sound is stuck in their throat). A true stutter may or may not be accompanied by secondary behaviours such as tensing, head nodding or eye blinking when stuttering.

    A true stutterer often, but not always, has a family history of stuttering. Boys are more likely to stutter than girls and it usually starts around 2.5 years (which doesn't really help since a developmental stutter is often seen around this time too).

    Hope that helps. If in doubt, pop your child's name down for an assessment just to be sure.

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    ~Marigold~ is offline You make me happy, when skies are grey
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    @Beccilou
    Bumping this thread. My DD is 2 (and four months) and has suddenly developed a stutter this week. I'm very concerned as it appears to be a "true stutter" as described above. I know, because I myself had the exact same stutter throughout childhood and also in adulthood. It's not the repeating of one word, it's as if the word is "stuck", for eg she will try and say "orange" and it's just "Oooooooorrr Oooooooorr", it's the same with other words beginning with a vowel. She was a very early talker and this has occurred right out of the blue. She has been able to converse fluently and clearly for well over 6 months and this sudden change in her speech is clearly distressing her. Yesterday she was becoming very frustrated and began crying when she could not get the word out. She said "I can't talk mama" and told me her mouth "is too high" which is her way of describing what's happening, the poor bug
    What should I do? Give it a month or intervene straight away? Is it likely to go away in it's own?
    Sorry to hijack your thread OP! I remembered this thread when you first posted it and so I searched the forums for it for advice.
    Last edited by ~Marigold~; 18-11-2014 at 09:02.


 

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