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  1. #1
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    Default Toddler engaging in dangerous behaviour

    My daughter is 20 months old and while she's been defiant before, never in an unsafe situation until now. She has recently started standing on the couch, then when I say "sit down" she laughs and dives on her belly, which could obviously see her dive off onto the floorboards! We're very consistent, saying sit down and if we get to her before she dives, we sit her down, get on her level and say "sit down, good girl". If she keeps doing it, we sit her on the floor. Usually if she's doing something "naughty" to get attention, I ignore her until she stops the bad behaviour and then give her attention once she's being good. But I can't ignore this because she's going to hurt herself :-( any tips?

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    My DS is shocking for climbing. I try to just take him down and not react and redirect him elsewhere but honestly, I'm kind of resigned to the fact that he's probably going to fall off something at some point and it will be the only way he learns. Which makes me sound awful I know.

    Like you, I ask him to get down, give him a hug and high five and lots of praise when he does. Apart from that, I try and make everywhere as safe as possible for him. So I have lots of foam mats in strategic places. It's the best I can do. I've also noticed if I take him somewhere like a playground earlier in the day then he is less likely to climb at home.

    Let's hope it's a stage!

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    Just consistency, and she will eventually get the message (or get bored with it and find another trick!). Keep moving her off and then redirect her to something else.

    She's just testing the boundaries in preparation for when she is 2 and 3!!!!

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    Subbing. My DD thinks it is hilarious too - she has jumped off the dining room table before :/

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    Subbing I am going through the same thing with my dd who is same age.. and im fretting it will only get worse when ds arrives next month

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Within reason I usually let DD go, she will learn once she hurts herself not to do it again.

    I will warn her she's going to get hurt, and she usually comes over for a cuddle once she does and doesn't do it again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    My DS is shocking for climbing. I try to just take him down and not react and redirect him elsewhere but honestly, I'm kind of resigned to the fact that he's probably going to fall off something at some point and it will be the only way he learns. Which makes me sound awful I know.

    Like you, I ask him to get down, give him a hug and high five and lots of praise when he does. Apart from that, I try and make everywhere as safe as possible for him. So I have lots of foam mats in strategic places. It's the best I can do. I've also noticed if I take him somewhere like a playground earlier in the day then he is less likely to climb at home.

    Let's hope it's a stage!
    Sometimes hurting themselves is the only way they learn. My mil spends all her time telling my boys to be careful at the playground, it never sunk in but one fall and they stop doing whatever it is that she was stopping them doing.

    I'm not suggesting you stop trying to get her to stop, but just be aware that sometimes it won't sink in easily.

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    I take a bit of a different tack on this one. I don't tell my DD off if she's doing something dangerous, I just remove and redirect/distract. So she doesn't realize she's getting any sort of attention for the behaviour. It seemed to work really well with both of my kids.

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    Ds2 is completely reckless and a shocking climber. He has fallen off so many bits of furniture it's not funny, not to mention getting stuck in crazy places. If I find him in a precarious situation I try to teach him how to get out of it. Like I found him half dangling off the back of the couch when he was about 1, so I turned him around backwards and he lowered himself down (he was about to go head first). He tried a few more times and learnt how to do it safely. Obviously climbing over backs of couches isn't desirable, but he's the kind of kid that will just laugh and jump head first if I tell him off. I also agree that sometimes hurting themselves or getting s fright is the only way they learn. Keep consistent, give the behaviour as little attention as possible and hopefully the novelty will wear off soon, sounds like she's just testing the boundaries.
    Last edited by decemberbubba; 18-10-2014 at 06:18.

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    Quote Originally Posted by decemberbubba View Post
    Ds2 is completely reckless and a shocking climber. He has fallen off so many bits of furniture it's not funny, not to mention getting stuck in crazy places. If I find him in a precarious situation I try to teach him how to get out of it. Like I found him half dangling off the back of the couch when he was about 1, so I turned him around backwards and he lowered himself down (he was about to go head first). He tried a few more times and learnt how to do it safely. Obviously climbing over backs of couches isn't desirable, but he's the kind of kid that will just laugh and jump head first if I tell him off. I also agree that sometimes hurting themselves or getting s fright is the only way they learn. Keep consistent, give the behaviour as little attention as possible and hopefully the novelty will wear off soon, sounds like she's just testing the boundaries.
    This! Redirect or teach how to do it safely.


    Like when dh taught dd1 how to climb bookshelves at 7mths old.


 

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