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  1. #31
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    I'm torn on this. On one hand I understand it must be lots of work having back up food for fussy eaters. But on the other, I get really annoyed at the strict rules of CC and pre schools and what they will let parents pack on the premise of the centre having to provide nutritious meals... then some CC's offer kids crap as back up

    The other side is that parents are paying customers. CC isn't providing you a community service you are paying their wages and thus regularly sending kids home hungry doesn't fit with good service.

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    Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)

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    There's a big difference between 'fussy or picky' eaters and eating disorders related to sensory issues. Child care is supposed to be inclusive so if there are kiddies with special considerations they need to be aware of this and offer support for whatever is needed.
    Just had to put that out there.

    Yes... @WiseOldOwl that's great you got funding for an extra person. I hope the OP can you look into it. Also the funding can be on short term basis too. I have a friend who got some funding for a settling in period because her little boy has a serious cardiac condition and was having difficulty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I'm torn on this. On one hand I understand it must be lots of work having back up food for fussy eaters. But on the other, I get really annoyed at the strict rules of CC and pre schools and what they will let parents pack on the premise of the centre having to provide nutritious meals... then some CC's offer kids crap as back up
    They're not actually allowed to do this. I can't remember the exact section, but it's specifically mentioned in the national quality framework that centres must have policies that adhere to current dietary guidelines... but that these do NOT override parental autonomy. I don't know how it works when the centre provides food, but if they don't, then they are NOT able to dictate what parents sends except when it comes to safety.

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  6. #34
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    Although DD's childcare provide food, she takes her own lunch in because I don't think the standard of food is acceptable. The CC has only provided food for the last 12 months, prior to that all the children bought their own food. One room DS was in a carer asked me if DS could not have eggs on a particular day of the week because one of his classmates had an egg allergy. No issue with me, DS didn't get eggs on Tuesdays. If you would prefer him to take his own food then ask what the allergies are that you need to accommodate and if you can accommodate then perhaps push that angle. There are hundreds of CCs out there that don't provide food, how do they all accommodate allergies?

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    I don't know what it's like in other centres but the child care DS goes to there is eating all day long: breakfast, morning tea, lunch, milk, afternoon tea, milk. So if DS refuses one of the meals I don't think it's a big deal, he will eat something else later. I don't expect him to be offered an alternative. In fact, I prefer that he isn't so that he has a chance to try new flavours, and if there is something that he really dislikes, he can make up for it in the next hour or so when they offer food again. And he knows well the routine of the centre, that food is offered and he can choose to eat or not. I think it's good that he learns that different places have different foods, that he may like or not, and that there won't always be someone trying to make something special for him.

    That being said my son doesn't have a disability or other health problems, so I understand it can be different in those situations.

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    I would be fine with it personally, but that's because it's bo different to our policy at home. I making offer 1 meal, if she chooses not to eat it that's her choice. She does occasionally go on 'meal strikes' where she refuses a particular meal, no matter what it is, for a while. Recently had a dinner strike that lasted a couple of months. But I know she eats well during the rest of the day so she isn't going to starve.

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    http://www.acecqa.gov.au/Quality-Areas

    I don't know if the above link works, but it is the National Quality Standard for child care (ACECQA). Centres are required to provide a nutritious, healthy foods, taking into account likes and dislikes, etc. Most centres, for example, may provide a choice of toast or weet-bix for breakfast, a fruit platter for lunch, and a rice and chicken dish for lunch. All of these options provide choice for the child - eg, for lunch, they can eat just plain rice or eat the chicken if they want. There should be choice and variety within the meal, but this doesn't mean the kids get to eat buttered white bread if they don't want to eat. It doesn't mean that the centre must provide cocoa pops and biscuits if this is what the child likes and chooses to eat. Some centres ask parents to provide the food, some centres provide the food themselves. Centres that provide the food are generally extremely well trained and cautious about allergies, and as such, ask parents not to send in food. Some parents will (knowingly or unknowingly) send in foods that cause an allergic reaction - not all parents are careful with the food they provide, and the centre can then be liable (not to mention the emotional distress) if a child dies from an anaphylactic reaction.

    OP, I would ask for a copy of the menu, and find out about the variety of food offered thoughout the day. Usually, for example, morning tea would be a fruit platter with a variety of choices, so unless the child eats absolutely no fruit - they will generally eat something that is offered.

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  14. #38
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    Hmm. Barring a health/medical/disability related reason for not eating the food, and assuming they are offering reasonable variety, I would probably let him go for a while and see if he will start branching out and eating. *disclamer* I am jaded by having a very fussy chilld who would come home from daycare with a full lunchbox.

    I don't know if the above link works, but it is the National Quality Standard for child care (ACECQA). Centres are required to provide a nutritious, healthy foods, taking into account likes and dislikes, etc.
    hehe, my child would have broken them.

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    I really, really don't agree with a child not being offered a range of choices or at least another option. Let's face it our tastes are all different depending on cultural reasons, individual preferences and exposure.

    my toddler didn't eat the main meal on offer at day care for the first few months and was given yoghurt and fruit as a back up and I was happy with that. She does actually eat the food now which it good!

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    Thank you all for your perspectives. I was deliberately not forthcoming about my son's ASD diagnosis because I didn't want this to be an excuse for this situation as I feel the cc has done.

    My take on the situation, based on the conversation I had with staff was that he wasn't eating because he had ASD, that this was a disability issue so he couldn't be helped as they were short staffed and they weren't trained to deal with that. They didn't even investigate my concerns. Just said oh he's got ASD, that's why he's not eating. I have since looked at the menu and I can see why he's not eating it. One, because it's food I do not and would never serve at home and two, because I wouldn't eat it myself.

    I have not been able to speak with the director or the owner of the center yet, despite leaving messages. I have no alternative but to put my concerns in writing...which is probably the better option. Thank you for the links to food guidelines. I will utilise those.

    I disagree with the tough love stance. In my view, there is no love in allowing your child to go without eating, particularly one so young. In any circumstance.
    As a parent, I am my child's guardian and advocate and I refuse to pass something off as fussy or dismiss a concern if the child doesn't have a disability. Just because my child has been diagnosed with one doesn't mean I must automatically conclude it's related to that either.

    My son, when he goes home, when he is not sleepy, is agitated, goes straight to the pantry and waits for me to cook him something (he can't speak). He'll eat no trouble. He'll gulp it down. He's now started taking food to bed...this is distressing to me because this is a normal, non ASD reaction to deprivation, an observation backed by my doctor. It further suggests to me that he isn't getting any food at all during the day.

    My feeling is that he won't eat the food at cc because it's foreign to him or that it's something he simply doesn't like. I hate tuna patties too. More so when they're spiced. So the point of this post was to wonder aloud whether he was being discriminated against or whether I needed to adopt a different approach to ensuring he is fed during the day.

    Your feedback certainly helps me do this. Thank you again.
    Last edited by Mrs Tickle; 15-10-2014 at 06:37.


 
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