+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 66
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,427
    Thanks
    497
    Thanked
    1,588
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Unless he has sensory issues that need to be catered for (and in that case I would be sending my own food) then I would probably expect that he eat what is provided (genuine dislikes aside). Do the meals have several components to them so that he may eat one or more components but leave others?

    He won't starve from missing one meal.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,669
    Thanks
    1,004
    Thanked
    2,412
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    It was the same at my oldest child's daycare. They ensured the child did not starve all day (ie. gave them extra at afternoon tea etc) but they said kids ended up eating the food after a couple of weeks. I know my oldest ate things at daycare she wouldn't even have tried at home...but she tried them and enjoyed them.
    No disabilities though, so if there is a sensory issue then I wouldn't be okay. For my child it was just genuine fussiness.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Smyles View Post
    We always offered alternatives like crackers or a sandwich for any child who didn't like the lunch.

    I would be having a firm word with the center, if they are unwilling to offer an alternative, they will need to advise you on their allergy policy so you can send something suitable.
    Our daycare in Melbourne was the same as this. I'd have no problem with a centre strictly enforcing its food policy if what they offered included veggie sticks, cheese etc (ie simple food most kids would eat) but at our centre the food was quite out there at times and my kids loathed it (it was always a one pot dish which made it impossible to break into parts). All my kids have always hated one pot dishes (stews, slow cooked meals) etc. They were offered vegemite sandwiches and cheese, but only after the meal was over and the others had left the table.

    ETA I didn't know this until well into the first year (I happily thought they were eating the food they were offered). The carers used to make sure they ate well at morning and afternoon tea. But my kids were always too busy playing to eat well at day care anyway.
    Last edited by Sonja; 13-10-2014 at 13:19.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    9,870
    Thanks
    3,034
    Thanked
    5,843
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I would honestly pull him out and find another centre (if possible).

    My DS has sensory issues and eats very few foods. He is going to preschool next year and thankfully we will be responsible for providing his own food.

    Children like my DS won't just eat what is given. They won't just 'get used to it' and start suddenly eating normally like the other kiddies. They will starve themselves before they try new foods.

    Is your little guy on the autism spectrum OP?

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    Happymum2  (13-10-2014),LoveLivesHere  (13-10-2014),Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,377
    Thanks
    820
    Thanked
    1,104
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I think it depends on what your son's disability is as other have said. Does he eat morning tea/afternoon tea there at all? Or is he not eating all day?
    My (almost 2 year old) son often goes without lunch as he is fussy and won't even try things alot of the time. I don't offer alternatives and he just eats extra at afternoon tea and dinner. I would not have a problem with them not giving an alternative to my kids if they refused lunch every day (if they were eating afternoon tea/dinner). I think they would soon learn to at least try something if they were hungry (disabilities aside).

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to sajimum For This Useful Post:

    Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)

  8. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,757
    Thanks
    1,205
    Thanked
    2,112
    Reviews
    15
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Our daycare would always have sandwiches or crackers with a side of fruit/cheese for those who didn't eat the hot dish that was being served.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Anjalee For This Useful Post:

    Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)

  10. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    4,308
    Thanks
    3,424
    Thanked
    1,831
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I don't think people can give you their true opinion without knowing whether your child's disability affects his ability to eat certian foods.

  11. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,374
    Thanks
    774
    Thanked
    1,769
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Without knowing what your son's disability is, it's really difficult to answer this. If it is a diagnosed medical issue that involves genuine sensory issues, then that should be catered for - BUT he should also be given inclusion funding and be given the extra staffing support needed for his additional needs.

    I don't believe that the issue is that they are 'starving him' or 'not feeding him' - they ARE feeding him, he is just refusing to eat the food that is offered. Does he refuse all meals, snacks, etc, or just lunch? Will he eat fruit for morning tea, for example? I personally am not a fan of offering alternatives, as kids are pretty quick to get the idea that if I refuse lunch, I get a sandwich instead, so they will refuse a nice healthy lunch every day, and wait for their sandwich to be served to them. I never offer my own children alternatives if they don't eat lunch or dinner - I give them their food, and if they are hungry, they will eat it. If not, they won't eat. I have the least fussy eaters you've ever seen, but they know that they can't refuse dinner and get their second choice. If my kids were at daycare, I wouldn't want them to be offered alternatives to lunch - that would undo all my hard work of raising kids to learn to eat what they're given. I also think it's a big ask to expect the carers to start offering alternatives for every child who doesn't want to eat. The cook works hard to make a nice, healthy chicken and veg casserole or something, and then 20 of the kids refuse, so the daycarers have to make 20 sandwiches? And then 10 of those refuse sandwiches, so they get a bikkie instead? How long will it be until all the kids refuse lunch and the sandwich so that they can all have a bikkie? That's not really practical, or encouraging healthy eating habits.

    ...mind you, I say all of this based on my own parenting and healthy eating philosophy, and my own experiences working in child care - AND I get that a child with a disability involving sensory issues is completely different, and needs to be catered for accordingly.

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to cheeeeesecake For This Useful Post:

    Funnels  (13-10-2014),Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014),NoteToSelf  (13-10-2014)

  13. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Without knowing what your son's disability is, it's really difficult to answer this. If it is a diagnosed medical issue that involves genuine sensory issues, then that should be catered for - BUT he should also be given inclusion funding and be given the extra staffing support needed for his additional needs.

    I don't believe that the issue is that they are 'starving him' or 'not feeding him' - they ARE feeding him, he is just refusing to eat the food that is offered. Does he refuse all meals, snacks, etc, or just lunch? Will he eat fruit for morning tea, for example? I personally am not a fan of offering alternatives, as kids are pretty quick to get the idea that if I refuse lunch, I get a sandwich instead, so they will refuse a nice healthy lunch every day, and wait for their sandwich to be served to them. I never offer my own children alternatives if they don't eat lunch or dinner - I give them their food, and if they are hungry, they will eat it. If not, they won't eat. I have the least fussy eaters you've ever seen, but they know that they can't refuse dinner and get their second choice. If my kids were at daycare, I wouldn't want them to be offered alternatives to lunch - that would undo all my hard work of raising kids to learn to eat what they're given. I also think it's a big ask to expect the carers to start offering alternatives for every child who doesn't want to eat. The cook works hard to make a nice, healthy chicken and veg casserole or something, and then 20 of the kids refuse, so the daycarers have to make 20 sandwiches? And then 10 of those refuse sandwiches, so they get a bikkie instead? How long will it be until all the kids refuse lunch and the sandwich so that they can all have a bikkie? That's not really practical, or encouraging healthy eating habits.

    ...mind you, I say all of this based on my own parenting and healthy eating philosophy, and my own experiences working in child care - AND I get that a child with a disability involving sensory issues is completely different, and needs to be catered for accordingly.
    And this is where I differ in these threads and always will. You can put a beatuifully cooked steak in front of me 1,000 times and I will never ever eat it. I've been raising my kids long enough to know the difference between being difficult or fussy, and a genuine no I won't eat that and I don't care how many times you offer it to me. The lunch at my kids daycare was food they (by and large) wouldn't eat. I didn't know they wouldn't eat that type of food until then as I'd never offered it to them. I knew they weren't eating much of it (the taste column would only be ticked) but wasn't fussed. Only at the end did I discover they had been given other food.

    I have no issue with centres having their own policies and knowing what I know now would always choose somewhere we can send our own food to avoid the problem.

    I just strongly disagree with the philosophy that all kids will eventually eat if the food is offered enough times. Or they will eat it if they're hungry. My kids have no sensory issues or disabilities, just strong preferences about what sort of food they really don't like.

    It's great that that has worked for your children. My kids do eat a wide variety of food (except for DD2 who is another story). I just adopted a different approach to get them there.
    Last edited by Sonja; 13-10-2014 at 14:51.

  14. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Sonja For This Useful Post:

    Anjalee  (13-10-2014),GrabbyCrabby  (13-10-2014),Little Miss Sunshine  (13-10-2014),LoveLivesHere  (13-10-2014),misskittyfantastico  (13-10-2014),MissMuppet  (13-10-2014),Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014),oozzle  (13-10-2014)

  15. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,337
    Thanks
    1,301
    Thanked
    589
    Reviews
    8
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I had the same issue with my DD.. She has asd and will never in a million years eat a Beef and Bean casserole (which they offered and seemed to cook regularly).
    Upon enrollment, I did tell them about her issues with food and they said they'd offer a vegemite and cheese sandwich or something plainer if she didn't like the cooked lunch. After bringing my DD home starving most of the time, I pulled her out. Don't like my kids going hungry...

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to oozzle For This Useful Post:

    Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Does anyone not use child care?
    By NAT2561 in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 86
    Last Post: 26-05-2014, 19:01
  2. Child care centre or family day care
    By angelface07 in forum Childcare Options
    Replies: 92
    Last Post: 22-10-2013, 15:34
  3. Sending child to 2 different child care centres
    By WiseOldOwl in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 18-10-2013, 16:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Mother and Baby Shop
Save $$$ during our Christmas Sale Mother and Baby Shop
Great prices on Schoenhut kids pianos, toys, baby clothing as well as big brands like Pigeon, NUK, Cherub Baby and many more. Sale starts on 1 November 2016 and ends on the 27 December 2016. Hurry! Place your order today!
sales & new stuffsee all
The Health Hub
Give a new mum a fitness boost for Christmas & New Year. Studio-based, small group training sessions - cardio, strength, core, Pilates & boxing. Choice of 16 hrs per week, flexible-arrival feature - bubs & kids welcome! Gift vouchers available.
featured supporter
ProSwim
ProSwim Rostrevor runs learn to swim classes for children and adults. Lessons are run during the Summer months (Oct-Mar). Our indoor centre at Plympton Park has lessons all year round, including school holidays.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!