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  1. #1
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    Question Not being fed at child care. What should I do?

    Got an issue that raised it's head today and not sure what to do about it.

    I discovered that when my 3 year old child refuses his food, he is not offered an alternative but is left to go hungry. Their reasoning is that he'll eat if he's truly hungry and that if they offered him an alternative then all the other children would want it and that's not fair.

    I offered to send him on with his own food. This was refused because 'we have children with allergies here'.

    One of the workers then used his disability as an excuse, saying they couldn't do one on one care as they were short staffed. That I reminded them that fussy eating was NORMAL reaction for kids of this age and was backed up by a medical practitioner fell on deaf ears.

    I am new to this child care caper. Do day care centres do this? Just leave a child to starve? How should I handle this? I have approached the staff verbally asking questions, the director is never there so thinking of putting my concerns in writing. Or should I just pull my child put and find another day care center?

    Help.

  2. #2
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    I'm not sure about anyone else's centre - but when my 2yo DS refuses to eat lunch they always offer him alternatives - either purée veggies from the babies room or even snacks like rice cakes/custard/biscuits. They don't bother offering alternatives for morning tea as they know he has a huge breakfast at home - but definitely for lunch yes.

    They never just let him go hungry if he refuses the first option. They know he's not an eater so they always keep offering alternatives through the day.

    I personally wouldn't be happy if they weren't offering alternatives. What if he genuinely didn't like what they served?

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    JAG242  (13-10-2014)

  4. #3
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    I think you might get different perspectives on this. At our child care the kids are offered great food. Yes, they might not be overfussed on say - celery, but at the same meal there might be carrot sticks and cheese offered which they will eat more of. We tend to have not given into what the kids choose to eat but do feed them good healthy food (with treat foods at times) that we know is tasty and age appropriate (even though DH would be stoked if they hankered into a green curry). At the same time we try to cook 'favourite' foods that fit within nutritional boundaries. We also expect our kids to 'try' a food, particularly when being guests. I don't expect the host to make a different meal for them, but for the kids to try the new foods. Of course if it is way too spicy or tastes off then we would probably give them a quiet 'out' of eating it! Have to be creative sometimes. Also, when putting food on their plate when out we wouldn't put large portions of foods we know they are not fond of on their plate, yet more of the things they would prefer. It's all a balancing act.

    Is there something wrong with the food that is being offered or is there no variety for him to choose from? Perhaps if the centre offered the children variety in the meal itself it may work better.
    Last edited by Little Ted; 13-10-2014 at 12:54.

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    Ellewood  (20-10-2014)

  6. #4
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    It depends on his disability. If it includes a sensory issue it needs to treat the same as a allergy. It's a medical issue. Get your Dr to write a letter including the foods that can be used as a back up food. Eg plain rice. Plain yogurts etc.

    If it's not a medical issue than I am not sure what you could do.

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    You mentioned your child has a disability? May I ask if it involves any sensory/eating issues?

    I ask because my nearly 2 year old is in daycare. She has lots of food issues. I provide her lunch as the Centre doesn't provide food. That said... Because she has a disability the Centre gets inclusion funding which means an extra person when she is there which helps with her meal times as she needs an extra long time.
    Is this something that you could look into?
    I think it's very disappointing they aren't going the extra mile and offering something else. I would chat with this director about your concerns. Our might be just a phase of fussy eating but it would be good if they could help encourage eating a bit more.

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    We always offered alternatives like crackers or a sandwich for any child who didn't like the lunch.

    I would be having a firm word with the center, if they are unwilling to offer an alternative, they will need to advise you on their allergy policy so you can send something suitable.

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    I had the opposite problem. DS was not eating lunch so they gave him buttered white bread as an alternative. Of course every day he would then refuse lunch and get given buttered white bread! I told them I didn't want him to just have bread and he needed to at least eat a certain amount of lunch to get bread/afternoon tea and he would soon learn. I am not a mean mummy I swear-he was 3 at the time and perfectly capable of eating what I put in front of him at home! Well they said they would stop but I would still come in to the board saying he had 'bread only' that day. So I brought it up again and they said they felt sorry for him not having anything! Erm, what happened to respecting the parents wishes?

    Anyhoo, OP can you ask exactly what allergies are in the centre and say you will be bringing foods that do not contain those things? There needs to be some kind of compromise.

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    I can see both sides
    I understand why the daycare doesn't offer alternatives for the exact reasons they gave you, but I would also be upset if my child was going hungry
    My children are fussy, but they eat what they're given at daycare BECAUSE they know there's no alternative. It's actually really improved their eating habits.
    If I was really concerned I would either a) try to swap to a different centre that doesn't supply food so you coud send your own, or b) get a letter from a medical professional saying that he needs a specialised diet that you will provide

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    normal at our day care centre. within 2-3 weeks ds was eating.

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    Mrs Tickle  (15-10-2014)

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    I am new to this child care caper. Do day care centres do this? Just leave a child to starve? How should I handle this? I have approached the staff verbally asking questions, the director is never there so thinking of putting my concerns in writing. Or should I just pull my child put and find another day care center?

    Hmm sorry but I'm from the school of tough love and wouldn't have a problem with their policy. If my ds doesn't like lunch then he will eat more at arvo tea or dinner. I certainly don't make a 2nd meal at home to please my ds. "Just leave a child to starve" is a bit dramatic.

    You didn't elaborate on the disability so I'm not sure if we can take that into account?

    Help.[/QUOTE]



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