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  1. #51
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    Don't feel bad. The research into gut flora is still developing. Make sure to give him a course of probiotics once he's off them.

    DD had ABs at birth, didn't need them at all for a couple of years then had so many I lost count until the tonsils came out. I would give her inner health and she's strong like an ox now, rarely sick, no allergies, no asthma (both run in our families).

    I would think there would be a definite correlation between ABs and athsma. To use my nephew as an example, if he gets a respiratory infection it triggers his athsma. So his parents need to be vigilant in ensuring treating any viruses that develop into a bacterial infection as 'riding it out' could see him in hospital from his athsma. Do as a statistic, he probably has had more ABs than most non-athsmatic kids his age.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    I haven't read all the responses, though I'll get to it.

    I'd be extremely hesitant to use antibiotics, because the bacteria in our bodies (particularly in out gut) is absolutely crucial to our health. We're only just starting to learn about some of the roles that bacteria play, but we DO know that a course of anti-biotics can permanently alter your bacterial ecosystem.
    It's not the case for everyone, but your bacteria may re-*****ise in such a way that you lose diversity, or alter the balance in a negative way. We know, for a fact, that use of antibiotics in early childhood is associated with an increase in certain long-term health conditions, such as asthma.

    In your situation, I'd see another doctor (I know, not easy for you personally). I'd get a second opinion, explain my reservations, and probably play wait-and-see unless it was critical that the antibiotics be used. In the end, if they were needed, then so be it...but they'd have to REALLY be needed.


    Edit: Seriously? I can't use the word c o l o n i s e because it contains c o l o n?? What is that even be a banned word?
    Antibiotics can't be all that bad .... They must do some good in solving health problems otherwise they wouldn't well be handed out by trained medical professionals...

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    BettyV  (27-09-2014),Donnab739  (28-09-2014),snowqu33n  (27-09-2014)

  4. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    Well, now I feel like crap :-(

    Too late, I started the course last night because I was desperate so now I've got to finish it right? I've been trying to avoid ABs, but DS has literally been sick all year with one thing or another, apart from about 5 days in July and it's breaking my spirit and I worry that it's breaking his. This helps me though, I'll try and just soldier on in the future...

    I have no option with doctors. There is literally nothing I can do about it. There are two doctors clinics here, but the other hasn't been taking new patients for the past five years. It's a miracle I could even get him in yesterday. No doctors on the weekend, so I had to weigh up my options and what I thought was best. It's all we can ever do, hey :-)
    Don't feel guilty Harvs. You could be doing worse things than following the advice of a TRAINED medical professional....!

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  6. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    I would think there would be a definite correlation between ABs and athsma. To use my nephew as an example, if he gets a respiratory infection it triggers his athsma. So his parents need to be vigilant in ensuring treating any viruses that develop into a bacterial infection as 'riding it out' could see him in hospital from his athsma. Do as a statistic, he probably has had more ABs than most non-athsmatic kids his age.
    Sorry but I have to say I think your sample size is far too small to back that conclusion!

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  8. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Sorry but I have to say I think your sample size is far too small to back that conclusion!
    Sure, but she has a point.

    There's a known correlation, not causation. That's certainly one possible explanation. I was just using that as an example, albeit a poor one since (as others have pointed out) the research is in its infancy.

    And VicPark... I certainly didn't say they do no good. Anti-biotics are fantastic, and certainly responsible for many people being alive who otherwise wouldn't be. I personally am hesitant to use oral anti-biotics unless absolutely necessary. I'm by no means saying that others should act in the same way.

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  10. #56
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    I don't like using antibiotics unless I feel I have no other choice, same goes for DS (17 months). He's had a few colds/bugs in his life which I haven't given him antibiotics for. My Dr is hesitant to give him antibiotics as well unless it's definitely needed.

    Last week I took DS to the Dr as he had quite a bad cough and sounded like Darth Vader even when he was relaxed. The Dr took one listen to his chest and gave a script for antibiotics which I filled and gave to DS. I felt awful giving him his first course of antibiotics, but you do what you have to He's pretty much recovered now, so hopefully your DS has a quick recovery too

  11. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Sure, but she has a point.

    There's a known correlation, not causation. That's certainly one possible explanation. I was just using that as an example, albeit a poor one since (as others have pointed out) the research is in its infancy.
    Thanks, yes it was an individual example to explain a potential reason for a correlation. Early data usually reveals 'links' which need to be investigated further before considered conclusive.

    I'm a firm believer that we've still barely scratched the surface towards fully understanding the body and disease. This will have a big impact for future generations and their medical care. For us living now though we can only access what is current and treat with what has so far been shown to work.


 

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