+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43
  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    7,850
    Thanks
    5,065
    Thanked
    4,446
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    I wouldn't worry. My DD was the same at that age. It was at about 26/27 months and her speech just exploded. She's now 2.5 and we cannot shut her up!

    I was also advised that children learn to speak at such varying rates but by three they should be at roughly the same point. Before then, if they show signs they understand, their lack of speech before 3 isn't an issue.

    One thing we did do just prior to DDs speech explosion, we thought perhaps she didn't have the muscle definition in her mouth to speak, so a friend advised us her daughter who was speech delayed was offered chewy lollies to help build her muscles. So we gave DD 1-2 starburst chewy lollies a day and it wasn't long after she started talking more. It could have been purely a coincidence, but I guess we will never know.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to A-Squared For This Useful Post:

    cheekychook  (02-09-2014)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,085
    Thanks
    424
    Thanked
    599
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Thanks for all your responses, it's very interesting to read all your advice.

    I'll try and reply to the points I remember!!

    I read to him a lot. If I asked him where the shoes are, he points to them and says 'oh there'! His answer to most things is there. Say if I hold his drink back and sat 'what do you want' rather than day drink he'll point to his bottle and say ta.

    He doesn't say many animal sounds, not something I've really done, will get on to it now!!

    I think his personality plays a part too. He's always been quite, more of a observer.

    I work full time so would struggle to take him to a play group.

    Thanks everyone. I think I'll wait till he's two, and then go from there. I'll probably keep stressing though!!!

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,085
    Thanks
    424
    Thanked
    599
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by GingerKat View Post
    My DS is almost 20 months, and although he can mimick words in the right context (he can say 'ready set go' in play, or 'oh yuck' when I pull his nappy off because I always say it, or 'what's that?' when he points to something) he doesn't say anything truly meaningful like 'hungry', 'drink', 'up' and he doesn't name anything like 'dog', 'cat', etc. He understands if I say no, but if I instruct him to do something ie 'give mummy the toy please' he doesn't seem to understand and be able to follow that instruction. He can say mummy and daddy but doesn't really do it often, he mainly just whinges to get our attention. He can make some animal noises and makes train and car noises :P He just had a MCHN appointment where she did something called a Bridgance Screen and he didn't pass it. It tests to see if he is speech delayed for his age and it says he is. I asked the nurse what did that mean exactly? Does it suggest he have autism? Does it mean he's mentally below par? Does it mean he is going to have a learning difficulty? And she said no, because although he is speech delayed he is perfect in all other areas (emotional development, fine motor skills, etc) so all it means is that with early intervention we can get him talking sooner which will save him later frustration. Personally I still don't understand the point of taking him to speech pathology appointments just yet, but she did strongly recommend it so I will do it, so hopefully it will save us having to do this down the track if things don't improve. In the mean time he MCHN said to read him board books 3x a day, to point to the object and name it and ask him to try and name it and point 'where's the cow DS? Point to the cow' 'What noise does the cow make DS?' etc. She also said that rather than letting him whinge and respond to what you know he wants, repeat to him what he want using your word 'Oh DS, do you want a drink? You want a drink in your blue sippy cup?' And so on. She said this should help in the mean time before I see the speech pathologist. Oh and I also have to get his hearing tested even though we are pretty sure everything is ok there.
    Good luck! From my experience it's never too early to start speech ☺️ Fingers crossed both our boys start chatting our ears off soon!

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,085
    Thanks
    424
    Thanked
    599
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Allie Pallie View Post
    I wouldn't worry. My DD was the same at that age. It was at about 26/27 months and her speech just exploded. She's now 2.5 and we cannot shut her up!

    I was also advised that children learn to speak at such varying rates but by three they should be at roughly the same point. Before then, if they show signs they understand, their lack of speech before 3 isn't an issue.

    One thing we did do just prior to DDs speech explosion, we thought perhaps she didn't have the muscle definition in her mouth to speak, so a friend advised us her daughter who was speech delayed was offered chewy lollies to help build her muscles. So we gave DD 1-2 starburst chewy lollies a day and it wasn't long after she started talking more. It could have been purely a coincidence, but I guess we will never know.
    I don't think my DS will mind a lolly or two! Might be worth a shot, thank you. ☺️

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,478
    Thanks
    179
    Thanked
    784
    Reviews
    8
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My 20 month old dd is they'd same. Does not say many words at all, and of the ones she does say i interpret them as they're not clear. She understand everything I say or ask he to do. She seems so clever for a little person who doesn't talk.

    I figure it is because she has 2 older sisters who do everything she wants. All she needs to do is point or grunt at so etching and her doting sissys do/get it for her.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,085
    Thanks
    424
    Thanked
    599
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by thepouts View Post
    My 20 month old dd is they'd same. Does not say many words at all, and of the ones she does say i interpret them as they're not clear. She understand everything I say or ask he to do. She seems so clever for a little person who doesn't talk.

    I figure it is because she has 2 older sisters who do everything she wants. All she needs to do is point or grunt at so etching and her doting sissys do/get it for her.
    She's very clever because she knows her grunting works!!

    My DS doesn't have siblings but I know I preempt a lot of what he wants (someone told me it's what older mums do 😳), he probably doesn't have to ask for much and he gets it as soon as he says ta!!

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Melbourne
    Posts
    3,132
    Thanks
    1,097
    Thanked
    316
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    So glad I read this thread! Facing the same thing with my 15mo.

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    I've worked with Paediatric speech pathologists and generally they used to say that by around 2 years of age kids should have at least 50 words and be joining 2 words together. Saying that, there is a large range and some children (particularly boys) can just be late talkers. If you are concerned though I would definitely recommend talking to your child health nurse and getting a referral to a speech pathologist - they can have massive waiting lists so it's much better to be on it and decline the service if you end up not needing it. You could see a private speech pathologist but it can be expensive.

    Speech Pathologists are fantastic and can provide you with some great strategies to facilitate language development. They will see children of all ages - I remember they used to even occasionally see very young kids/babies who didn't babble much!

    A great website resource is the Hanen Centre. It has a section with tips for parents.

    Hope this is of some help.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to seren For This Useful Post:

    zooey  (04-09-2014)

  11. #19
    FearlessLeader's Avatar
    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    10,724
    Thanks
    2,498
    Thanked
    9,116
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    DS was a late talker. Until he was about 22 months he didn't make one single recognizable sound, but his comprehension was fine. Then he just started chatting a mile a minute and now goes on about precipitation and evaporation, theodolites and bioluminescence. I would try not to stress about it until he is two- I know for a fact you're probably doing all the right things already to facilitate his learning!

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to FearlessLeader For This Useful Post:

    cheekychook  (05-09-2014)

  13. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,085
    Thanks
    424
    Thanked
    599
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by seren View Post
    I've worked with Paediatric speech pathologists and generally they used to say that by around 2 years of age kids should have at least 50 words and be joining 2 words together. Saying that, there is a large range and some children (particularly boys) can just be late talkers. If you are concerned though I would definitely recommend talking to your child health nurse and getting a referral to a speech pathologist - they can have massive waiting lists so it's much better to be on it and decline the service if you end up not needing it. You could see a private speech pathologist but it can be expensive.

    Speech Pathologists are fantastic and can provide you with some great strategies to facilitate language development. They will see children of all ages - I remember they used to even occasionally see very young kids/babies who didn't babble much!

    A great website resource is the Hanen Centre. It has a section with tips for parents.

    Hope this is of some help.
    Thank you! I work with an awesome team of speech therapists so I've been picking their brain too. Thankfully I have these contacts so I'll get in to see someone really quickly. If needed I'll probably just pay to see someone privately. But I might take your advice and get a referral straight away.

    The MCHN wasn't worried at all, it's just me. I'm really hoping he just takes off soon.


 

Similar Threads

  1. PND and speech delay
    By Purple Lily in forum Development Stages
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-07-2014, 19:15
  2. Toilet training a late talker?
    By WiseOldOwl in forum Constipation, Toilet Training
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-12-2013, 14:45
  3. Speech delay
    By 2BlueBirds in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 25-10-2013, 06:43

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Shapland Swim Schools
Shapland's at participating schools offer free baby orientation classes once a month - no cost no catches. Your baby will be introduced to our "natural effects" orientation program develop by Shapland's over 3 generations, its gentle and enjoyable.
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
L'il Aussie Prems Foundation
An Australian charity supporting families of premature babies & children. The charity assists families who are at high risk of giving birth prematurely, who have babies currently in hospital and families with toddlers who were born too soon.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!