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  1. #1
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    Default Speech delay or just a 'late talker'

    Hi everyone. I have a 20 month old DS. I know that he isn't saying as much as his peers. He has around 10 words and he isn't stringing together two words yet.

    His receptive language is great, he understands everything I say. It's the expressive side that is worrying me. He is getting frustrated too.

    I spoke to the Mchn at his 18 months check up, she wasn't too worried. He was saying only 5 words then.

    Others have just said that he's probably just a late talker.

    I'm not overly worried as he's meeting all other milestones, but at the same time if he's going to need speech, I'd like to start it ASAP.

    What would you do? Should I be worried?

    Tia.

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    I wouldn't be overly worried just yet. They say Boys are slower to pick these things up than girls.

    As for the two words, my ds is 22 months and has only on two occasions said two words together and they were my daddy both times, and only very recently.

    DS talks quite alot compared to the others in our group all around the same age. But then there are others who talk hardly at all. Think they are all just different.

    We talk to ds ALOT and always have. So don't know if that's helped or it's just him.

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    I wouldn't worry - sounds like my son and he has pretty much caught up now at 2 and 4 months

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    cheekychook  (02-09-2014)

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    My oldest is 2.5 and he was a late talker. I was worrying as he seemed to be behind a lot of kids his age, but he turned 2 and really seemed to take off with his language.

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    cheekychook  (02-09-2014)

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    As the mother of a speech delayed son and a very verbal daughter I wouldn't worry at this age. As a very general rule of thumb a toddler should have a vocab of roughly the amount of words they are in months so 10 words for a 20 month old isn't too far off the mark. You can count animal noises as vocab too. I used to sing Old McDonald's farm to DS and get him to make the noises.

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    cheekychook  (02-09-2014)

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    My DS is almost 20 months, and although he can mimick words in the right context (he can say 'ready set go' in play, or 'oh yuck' when I pull his nappy off because I always say it, or 'what's that?' when he points to something) he doesn't say anything truly meaningful like 'hungry', 'drink', 'up' and he doesn't name anything like 'dog', 'cat', etc. He understands if I say no, but if I instruct him to do something ie 'give mummy the toy please' he doesn't seem to understand and be able to follow that instruction. He can say mummy and daddy but doesn't really do it often, he mainly just whinges to get our attention. He can make some animal noises and makes train and car noises :P He just had a MCHN appointment where she did something called a Bridgance Screen and he didn't pass it. It tests to see if he is speech delayed for his age and it says he is. I asked the nurse what did that mean exactly? Does it suggest he have autism? Does it mean he's mentally below par? Does it mean he is going to have a learning difficulty? And she said no, because although he is speech delayed he is perfect in all other areas (emotional development, fine motor skills, etc) so all it means is that with early intervention we can get him talking sooner which will save him later frustration. Personally I still don't understand the point of taking him to speech pathology appointments just yet, but she did strongly recommend it so I will do it, so hopefully it will save us having to do this down the track if things don't improve. In the mean time he MCHN said to read him board books 3x a day, to point to the object and name it and ask him to try and name it and point 'where's the cow DS? Point to the cow' 'What noise does the cow make DS?' etc. She also said that rather than letting him whinge and respond to what you know he wants, repeat to him what he want using your word 'Oh DS, do you want a drink? You want a drink in your blue sippy cup?' And so on. She said this should help in the mean time before I see the speech pathologist. Oh and I also have to get his hearing tested even though we are pretty sure everything is ok there.

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    I'm not sure if you do already but I would try reading lots to him. The simple one picture/word per page ones.
    I read them every night to my 16 month old DS and he knows about 25-30 words, mostly the words from those books! Also as pp said repeat words back to him when you are giving him things or he's pointing at them. Obviously I can't tell if that helped my kids or whether they were just good with language. Who knows. .
    There may not be an issue with your ds and he may get there in his own time but it can't hurt to try

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    cheekychook  (02-09-2014)

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    Eco Goddess is offline Loving life under the Bodhi tree!
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    My DS (now 4) was a brilliant talker and by 18months had an enormous vocal and said 3 word sentences regularly. My DD is almost 17months and doesn't talk much at all. She says mum, more, dad, Bo (nickname for her brother) dog, nan, no and that's about it. She doesn't say them all that often either. I'm not concerned, but it always is tempting to compare to other kids. Just keep exposing them to language and most of the time they will talk when ready. Even as adults...some of us like to talk a lot, others not so much!!

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    Interested - will come back and read/write more later. We're in the same boat with a nearly two year old, but no proper words at all, just sounds that I interpret as certain words.

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    see if you can find a playgroup run by therapists

    eg lifestart in nsw/sydney have open play groups that you can go to. they have a speechie and can spend some time with you and give you pointers


 

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