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  1. #71
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    Hand on heart I would never touch donor milk! And I know many BFs who feel the same.

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  3. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    Hand on heart I would never touch donor milk! And I know many BFs who feel the same.
    I completely agree! I have always said I would feed or express for someone else's baby but could never feel comfortable with someone feeding my own or giving them someone else's milk. Can't explain it - it just irks me.

    I also passionately detest pumping so would solely use formula if I had to do this - I really admire those who can pump.

    As for costs I've probably spent equal amounts on things for breastfeeding as for formula. I think the hope is that breastfeeding costs are initial setup or in the short term while formula is an ongoing cost. But realistically.. You have to pay for food weekly for yourself and family and when I was EBF I ate so much more so really cost more in groceries for me. Costs can be weighed up either way I guess is what I am saying and I completely see both sides of it in that regard!

    Eta: I just think the bf is free selling isn't entirely true. Just because you don't physically buy the milk doesn't mean it doesn't cost you money in some regard!
    Last edited by Soon2be4; 04-09-2014 at 07:47.

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  5. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia View Post
    I would respectfully disagree. I got free LC help at the hospital, private LC was free with PHI and my MCHN gave me a card of an ILBC that was cheaper. Unfortunately bf help is not subsidised by Medicare so the fault lies with the govt. Pumps you can hire instead of buying, boobie bikkies are easy to make and most of the supplements/teas you can conjure out of your pantry stores.

    Yes it can be expensive but it doesn't have to be. LCs do have training and are specialists in their field. We don't deny other medical professionals their fees?
    Yes, my private hospital was super supportive second time around and literally went above and beyond to help me establish bf as best they could. I had a horrendous time first time around with virtually no support, a baby who couldn't feed, I was already succumbing to pnd and we were discharged with a baby who couldn't attach to breast and told "hire a pump and if you can't attach, just pump and feed". I ended up with very severe and debilitating pnd which took a full 2year recovery. I believe it started with pethidine but also being so unsupported in my quest to bf and failing to bf. also the severe sleep deprivation that took hold while I endlessly pumped around the clock for 6 months for my son.

    anyway second time I was assigned an LC and multiple super experienced mw at every feed to assist with getting dd to feed. It really is an effort for my babies to latch and often involves 3 people, shields, syringes, tubes etc. it certainly ain't a one woman job that's for sure. My babies just do not attach to feed.

    I was still discharged with a baby not attaching, but really second time around I saw that there was nothing more that could be done. I was still discharged with baby almost at 10% weight loss, syringe and finger feeding after attempted breast feeding and then pumping after every feed.

    I also noticed that while hospital LC are "good" they certainly arent on par and really lack the current knowledge of the private LCs (ie promoting baby led attachment is very big now among ibclc but hospital lc still do the ramming baby head to breast method). Ive also noticed this lack of experience with free LC at the local mchn feeding clinics. They just don't have the one to one time to assist or even the knowledge or skills

    so while there are "free" alternatives these aren't always the best for each mother and baby, especially those with very complex bf problems.

  6. #74
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    On the topic of expenses, one of our antenatal classes was about feeding. In a nutshell, we were told that breastfeeding is sunshine and lollipops whereas formula was expensive and time consuming with all of the washing, sterilising etc.

    We weren't given much advice about potential breastfeeding issues, nor were we reassured that formula is a perfectly good alternative if we chose not to or couldn't breastfeed.

    Add in the immense pressure that had been put on me to make sure my preemie was only receiving breastmilk while in nicu/scn and beyond... it's no wonder I didn't make the switch to formula until I was at breaking point.

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  8. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by adeline14 View Post
    And bf hasn't turned into a million dollar industry? Lets think about it, IBCLC charging upwards of $120 to come and assist you to bf (um shouldn't they be providing a free or low cost service given they are at the forefront of the bf professionals, but no they attach a huge fee which is unattainable for some families to pay), plus size maternity bras retailing for $90, the big m brand selling pumps for upwards of $200, I bought a flimsy sns for $80 probs cost them $2 to make, shields arevaround $25, " boobie bikkies" from a renowned LC, books, magazine subscriptions, ABA membership fees, lactation teas and natural supplements I could go on and on.

    Bf has turned into big business and they are making money off something free, natural and the biological norm.

    Every mum has the right to bf and every baby has the right to receive breastmilk without the hefty price tag that comes with bf. Anyone else see this as unethical?

    (And I say all this as a mum who has literally spent countless $$$ trying to bf my kids. I spent over $500 in lactation consultant fees with my ds and with my dd, I have seen everyone from paeds to speech therapists to lcs etc to assess her mouth function).
    Iblcs do an awful lot of study and pro bono hours as part of their training. I can't believe you think they should be free? Would you object to paying for a physio or a masseuse?
    There are very few jobs available for them too so they go into private practice- it's their livelihood. You can sometimes claim it back on your health fund too. I would not expect anyone to study for a qualification then work for free. For me, I used the community LC so it was no cost. There are quite a few of them attached to hospitals and MCHN clinics in metro areas. I bought shields the other day for a friend, they were $12, bought my bras on sale and made my own bikkies. There are cheaper and better pumps out there too- not everything is a rip off. You don't have to join the ABA either- totally optional. You can still even ring their helpline for free if you aren't a member.
    But that aside, I still don't think it's a patch on the formula industry. Many people don't buy a pump or use an LC or shields or an SNS or supplements or any of that. There are people who just breastfeed and there is no money to be made from them. Formula feeding families are constantly buying formula for at least a year, often longer. If formula was allowed to be marketed, that's a constant purchase, you know?

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  10. #76
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    I agree. Breastfeeding has cost me virtually nothing. I bought one pump over 4 babies and some bras which have done very well. Never used medication, or LCs.

    The main cost of breastfeeding has been staying out of the workforce so I could feed for longer but that's another thread.

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  12. #77
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    But getting back to the question on what types of support would be useful in helping women to bf for longer, having cheaper or subsidised access to things such as pumps, LCs, support/advice, etc, would help? Not everyone has PHI, not everyone's supply can be established or maintained without pumping, not everyone lives in an area which has the types of free community services that some have been fortunate enough to access.

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    They shouldn't be free, but they should be available under medicare, I'm surprised that you wouldn't agree? You want high breastfeeding rates, then help needs to be accessible for all- lots of people just couldn't afford 120 per session - no matter how desperately they wanted to breastfeed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    Iblcs do an awful lot of study and pro bono hours as part of their training. I can't believe you think they should be free? Would you object to paying for a physio or a masseuse?
    There are very few jobs available for them too so they go into private practice- it's their livelihood. You can sometimes claim it back on your health fund too. I would not expect anyone to study for a qualification then work for free. For me, I used the community LC so it was no cost. There are quite a few of them attached to hospitals and MCHN clinics in metro areas. I bought shields the other day for a friend, they were $12, bought my bras on sale and made my own bikkies. There are cheaper and better pumps out there too- not everything is a rip off. You don't have to join the ABA either- totally optional. You can still even ring their helpline for free if you aren't a member.
    But that aside, I still don't think it's a patch on the formula industry. Many people don't buy a pump or use an LC or shields or an SNS or supplements or any of that. There are people who just breastfeed and there is no money to be made from them. Formula feeding families are constantly buying formula for at least a year, often longer. If formula was allowed to be marketed, that's a constant purchase, you know?

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  15. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    They shouldn't be free, but they should be available under medicare, I'm surprised that you wouldn't agree? You want high breastfeeding rates, then help needs to be accessible for all- lots of people just couldn't afford 120 per session - no matter how desperately they wanted to breastfeed.
    For many people, there's a big difference between a $20 tin of formula and some bottles compared to the cost of a LC.

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    Maybe they should be subsidised too? Some people actually need to do it, rather than choose to do it (not that I have any issues with anyone choosing to do it of course) I've got twins -one was on Lactose free- so that was around 45 a week...which is no small amount when you are at home with babies and not working...Hmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by redlipsandpearls View Post
    For many people, there's a big difference between a $20 tin of formula and some bottles compared to the cost of a LC.


 

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