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  1. #11
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    And I also would like to think that mental ability and well being is just as important a factor as the physical in this day and age. And it largely is except when it comes to BF.

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  3. #12
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    That's interesting, I fb for a little while but more so because it's the done thing, I was completely miserable the whole time, it just didn't feel right, moved to bottle and here I was happy. But I guess I didn't have any goals or expectations of bf.

  4. #13
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    The thing that sh!ts me, as someone who has both bf and ff, is the quoting of that 2% stat. Without proper education, support and practical help to balance it, what's the point of throwing that number at people? The help to bf is so inconsistent and patchy- 50 different mids in hospital, each with their own methods, who might tell you you're doing it wrong even when it's working or who might push formula top ups (in turn damaging your supply) and then another tells you off for the formula top ups- it's a wonder anyone manages. Until all that changes, bf rates won't improve and throwing that 2% quote around does nothing but make people feed bad. It also doesn't acknowledge the fact that some people choose to formula feed, as is their right.

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  6. #14
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    Just goes to show that society doesn't care about mental health issues. Which is such a pity - no wonder there is such a stigma attached.

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I think this is the spiral. You want to bf so much bc society tells you 'good' mothers do. It doesn't work for whatever reason which begins the slide into PND. Then the GP's/middies/MHN's/LC's reinforce the pressure and self loathing by telling you in fact only 2% of women can't bf (meaning stop making excuses, be a good mother and push through), they point out with vigor all the supposed negatives of formula. For a women who is extremely vulnerable and already feeling like a sh*t mum, this can and does tip them over the edge.

    I've always advocated more tangible support for bfing, but ffers need it too. Both with logistics (and despite some of the comments on this forum like "what is there to know? you shake a bottle?" there's a lot more to it than that). And with emotional support. The moment the ABA or LC knows you are switching it's like complete shut down. We can't support you now bc that would be encouraging formula

    I've felt such a weight lifted off my shoulders the last year or so. I finally accept I did what I could, my kids turned out fabulous and I'm a pretty good mum. So if these findings help lift the weight, then that is also fabulous

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  8. #15
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    I agree - that stat is stupid and damaging. I mean really - there are millions of things that we could all physically do, but emotionally etc? And what actually falls into that stat?

    Is it that you are still considered to physically be able to do it if you are in constant and agonising pain? RIght there that is stupid to include people like that in it, it would be like including people in a running race who had a slipped disc, they might still be physically capable of making it 50 meters, but they would be in agony, hunched over and dragging themselves to get here.

    I reiterate - that stat is not only silly - but it is also wrong.

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  10. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I think this is the spiral. You want to bf so much bc society tells you 'good' mothers do. It doesn't work for whatever reason which begins the slide into PND. Then the GP's/middies/MHN's/LC's reinforce the pressure and self loathing by telling you in fact only 2% of women can't bf (meaning stop making excuses, be a good mother and push through), they point out with vigor all the supposed negatives of formula. For a women who is extremely vulnerable and already feeling like a sh*t mum, this can and does tip them over the edge.

    I've always advocated more tangible support for bfing, but ffers need it too. Both with logistics (and despite some of the comments on this forum like "what is there to know? you shake a bottle?" there's a lot more to it than that). And with emotional support. The moment the ABA or LC knows you are switching it's like complete shut down. We can't support you now bc that would be encouraging formula

    I've felt such a weight lifted off my shoulders the last year or so. I finally accept I did what I could, my kids turned out fabulous and I'm a pretty good mum. So if these findings help lift the weight, then that is also fabulous
    I did find formula simple to use. That's just my experience though. The ABA and LCs aren't there to support or promote formula so I get why they step back if a person is switching- it's not their area to help with. I'm not sure what else they could do. Is it support or more acceptance you think ff mums need in that case? My MCHN and the LC insisted we use formula top ups and suggested we think about weaning on to formula due to my supply problems initially. Most GPs are all over formula, in my experience, and the majority of Australian babies are switched to formula in their first year, so I would have thought there was already adequate practical help and general acceptance? Obviously others have different experiences but I'm interested to hear- what do you think should change in regards to support for bottle feeding? Like, what would make it easier/better? What could be done to minimise the impact on mental health?

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    With Bub #2 due in 2 weeks, this thread is the best timing! I'm really wanting bf to work this time purely because of the convenience factor of not having to buy formula and sterilise bottles etc.

    At least I can openly state that and not feel selfish or guilty. I'm well aware of the other benefits of BF, but if I think about them too much, I will end up feeling horrible about ff next bub. I'm just not willing to put my mental health at stake by continuing to try and bf this bub if he doesn't take to it, my milk doesn't come in, or like DD ends up being CMPI.

    So thank you for sharing this article, it makes so much sense and just dispels another myth about breastfeeding.

  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    I did find formula simple to use. That's just my experience though. The ABA and LCs aren't there to support or promote formula so I get why they step back if a person is switching- it's not their area to help with. I'm not sure what else they could do. Is it support or more acceptance you think ff mums need in that case? My MCHN and the LC insisted we use formula top ups and suggested we think about weaning on to formula due to my supply problems initially. Most GPs are all over formula, in my experience, and the majority of Australian babies are switched to formula in their first year, so I would have thought there was already adequate practical help and general acceptance? Obviously others have different experiences but I'm interested to hear- what do you think should change in regards to support for bottle feeding? Like, what would make it easier/better? What could be done to minimise the impact on mental health?
    I think for me (and I did actually fall into the "2%" not that this should matter) I needed to get practical advice and help to do mixed feeding. I had so many physical and mental factors working against me but I was still very adamant I wanted to bf in any capacity I could. Mixed feeding is a very hard road though, especially when you're trying to build or keep what little supply you have. Feeding, pumping, preparing bottles, nursing, settling, was done around the clock. I needed advice from an expert who could help and support me in that , but really struggled to find anyone. It seemed to be an either-or attitude. For example, if I'm pumping between feeds, how will settle my newborn if she is crying and won't sleep? Do I top up with formula after each feed or do I just FF every few times? How do I manage to get out and go for a walk/have a nap/eat well every day when all my time is consumed with all of the above? And so on.

    Or maybe I just needed someone to tell me it's ok to let it go, just FF, and focus on my own mental and physical health?

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    I did find formula simple to use. That's just my experience though. The ABA and LCs aren't there to support or promote formula so I get why they step back if a person is switching- it's not their area to help with. I'm not sure what else they could do. Is it support or more acceptance you think ff mums need in that case? My MCHN and the LC insisted we use formula top ups and suggested we think about weaning on to formula due to my supply problems initially. Most GPs are all over formula, in my experience, and the majority of Australian babies are switched to formula in their first year, so I would have thought there was already adequate practical help and general acceptance? Obviously others have different experiences but I'm interested to hear- what do you think should change in regards to support for bottle feeding? Like, what would make it easier/better? What could be done to minimise the impact on mental health?
    I found formula relatively simple to use too, but there are so many options with bottles, flows of teat formula. I understand those agencies aren't there to provide ffing support, but the problem is, there isn't any. I think it's kind of assumed it's just shaking a bottle how hard can it be? but women are often struggling both physically and emotionally. I know with my eldest, someone sitting down with me discussing formula, that I could make up a jug for 24 hours rather than having to mix every 2 hours (I worked that out myself) but also someone to tell me "you are doing a great job" could have made a difference. There is no support once you make that leap to formula and I believe if that was provided those feelings of failure and resulting PND may reduce.

    I guess it's just different experiences. I found med pro's relatively supportive with DS, but absolutely revolting with DD. I was a first time mum, with no family support and having middies and MHN's judging the crap out of me. And not surprisingly.... I ended up depressed with DD. I've found society very supportive of bfing (although not after 2) but not of formula, which is odd given most ff after 6 months.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    what do you think should change in regards to support for bottle feeding? Like, what would make it easier/better? What could be done to minimise the impact on mental health?
    Hope it's okay to comment as a mixed feeder. The biggest thing I noticed was in hospital (even prior to hospital in birth classes) when it is assumed you will be breastfeeding. Why can't it be..

    "And how have you chosen to feed your new baby? Will you be breastfeeding or bottle feeding?" (Or even both)
    And then provide education for either option that was CHOSEN not thrust upon you.

    Another big thing that gets me is why does the formula tin need to state in BOLD: breastfeeding is best for your baby. What happens to: a well fed happy baby and mother who is coping with the biggest change in her life is the best thing for your baby.

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