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  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by peanutmonkey View Post
    I shouldnt have gone searching for the post you were talkinf about. I thought I was at peace with my formula feeding journey but in my current fragile state - nope shouldnt have read it.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Remember that your reasons were valid to you and who cares what some random judgy pants thinks? Do you think you are a good mum? (and I know the answer to that ) Parenting is not a journey which was one distinct road, there are many forks in the road and often all those decisions are valid.

    The research of late has really set me free, I hope you can get to that point too
    Beautifully said!

  3. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    I saw it and just went Like really$@)?;;
    Me too. Disappointing but not surprising. This type of "expert advice", while trying to be helpful, risks isolating women who are struggling and makes them feel like they're just not trying hard enough. It may seem like not a big deal, but to those who've given it their all and still "failed", it adds to those feelings of failure and potentially contributes to mental health issues. There needs to be greater recognition and empathy in the medical system for women that don't necessarily fall within the magical 2% but for whatever reason should be supported (and maybe even - gasp! - encouraged) to formula feed for theirs and their infant's sake. It's not black and white.

    Perhaps once we start looking at the issue more flexibly we will start providing more meaningful assistance to women to enable more or better breast feeding. Maybe instead of talking in terms of physically 'can' vs physically 'cannot', we should have a scale which incorporates mental and physical degrees of ability, support available to the mother, health barriers, etc.

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  5. #134
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    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    http://www.skepticalob.com/2013/05/world-health-organization-no-long-term-benefits-to-breastfeeding.html

    The link to the actual WHO study I have is down for maintenance at the moment.
    I'm not commenting on the WHO study but the skepticalob.com is nasty. She is a sanctimonious, spiteful, narrow-minded piece of work. I would strongly recommend not taking seriously anything she says.

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  7. #135
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    Breastfeeding has well-established short-term benefits, particularly the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases in childhood.

    This is why I want to try to bf even a few days if I can. I do believe colostrum does give short term immunity to stuff like rota virus etc which is important in the newborn stage before all their needles.

    It's the long term benefits that several studies seem to be dismissing, including the sibling study of over 8000 kids that shows no difference except a tiny change is asthma.

    So yes, tell women it's important for immunity, that it does have short term benefits. But med pros need to stop with making out it creates super beings.

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  9. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulK View Post
    Me too. Disappointing but not surprising. This type of "expert advice", while trying to be helpful, risks isolating women who are struggling and makes them feel like they're just not trying hard enough. It may seem like not a big deal, but to those who've given it their all and still "failed", it adds to those feelings of failure and potentially contributes to mental health issues. There needs to be greater recognition and empathy in the medical system for women that don't necessarily fall within the magical 2% but for whatever reason should be supported (and maybe even - gasp! - encouraged) to formula feed for theirs and their infant's sake. It's not black and white.
    Totally and that's the point I'm trying to make in this thread. The study has shown women with high expectations that then 'fail' at bfing have a much higher likelihood of PND. Why?? bc of these sort of comments, and they are everywhere. On forums, said my MIL's, by midwives.

    The lack of milk production isn't what's giving us PND. I argue it's the pressure around us - if we don't bf we are failures.

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  11. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    I'm not commenting on the WHO study but the skepticalob.com is nasty. She is a sanctimonious, spiteful, narrow-minded piece of work. I would strongly recommend not taking seriously anything she says.
    Yeah @Atropos mentioned that - didn't realise!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    Oh wow someone just spouted the whole "only a small percentage of women physically can't breastfeed and it all just depends how determined you are to BF".

    Oh and BF isn't optimal. It's "far more optimal".

    😁

  13. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Breastfeeding has well-established short-term benefits, particularly the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases in childhood.

    This is why I want to try to bf even a few days if I can. I do believe colostrum does give short term immunity to stuff like rota virus etc which is important in the newborn stage before all their needles.

    It's the long term benefits that several studies seem to be dismissing, including the sibling study of over 8000 kids that shows no difference except a tiny change is asthma.

    So yes, tell women it's important for immunity, that it does have short term benefits. But med pros need to stop with making out it creates super beings.
    The sibling study isn't worth the paper it's written on unfortunately- it was highly flawed in method. The standout is that the breastfeeding group had no criteria- so a baby could have had five breastfeeds then switched to formula for the rest of the study period and were still counted as breastfed. There has also been mention of bias in how the study was designed- it seemed to be looking to discredit bf for some reason. I'm not sure on that point but I've read it loads of times so thought it worth the mention.

    With colostrum- you can start expressing and freezing that from about 37 weeks? Handy

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  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    The sibling study isn't worth the paper it's written on unfortunately- it was highly flawed in method. The standout is that the breastfeeding group had no criteria- so a baby could have had five breastfeeds then switched to formula for the rest of the study period and were still counted as breastfed. There has also been mention of bias in how the study was designed- it seemed to be looking to discredit bf for some reason. I'm not sure on that point but I've read it loads of times so thought it worth the mention.

    With colostrum- you can start expressing and freezing that from about 37 weeks? Handy
    Wow really?? I never knew that!


 

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