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  1. #1
    Gothel's Avatar
    Gothel is offline Skip the drama, stay with Mama!
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    Default If a teenager falls behind in school...

    ... who should be held responsible? Bit of a random question I know, but it's been on my mind lately.

    As a teenager can a "kid" be mature enough to be responsible for managing their own study? Or should the teachers pick it up and talk to the parents? Or should the parents notice that the kids grades are falling behind and do something about it (assuming they are caring parents)?

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    It takes a village.

    I would hope everyone would notice and care.

    In reality, most teachers are way too busy too contact each parent when a student starts to sleep.

    In my world I try and keep in contact with teachers and make it known that either do or I are also open to a quick chat at drop off or pick up. His special needs teacher and I keep regular contact.

    So mainly the child and his parents.

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    In my experience with my teens..the teacher picks it up and they contact the parents and it's up to all of us to help get them back on track.

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    I think its a little bit of everything.

    I was an A grade student. Then dropped to a D grade student by yr 10 and dropped out of school.
    Teachers and my mum knew I was struggling, but no one even tried to assist me, or even how to. I was also under the stubborn thought that I COULD do it all by myself. But by the time I realised I needed to ask for help. My self esteem from years of 'failing' was depleted. And I chose to quit.

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    I think all three, not one party is solely responsible for a teenagers education.

    Parents should give their teenager the opportunity to study by helping them to sort out a study schedule, enforcing it by telling them it's x o'clock time to study, have an open dialogue surrounding how much time they need and question what their teachers expect.

    It is the teenagers responsibility to actually use the study time for school work and if they are having issues completing their homework to speak openly with their parents & teachers.

    I believe teachers are responsible for speaking with the parents about any changes in a teenagers school work, including if they fail to hand in assessment pieces.

    Education is a journey for both parents & children, communication is the key to success IMO.

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    Agree with others that it's all three.

    I think though, that for any one child, the parents have more of a responsibility than the teachers do. Of course a good teacher will do their best by all students... but a teacher can easily have a responsibility to 150 students. Few parents would be caring for quite so many kids.

    In the end, you cannot force a person to do something, so the final responsibility lays with the student. There is a LOT though that caring adults can do to assist and to motivate students in their learning.

  8. #7
    harvs's Avatar
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    Default If a teenager falls behind in school...

    I think it's such a complex question. Yes, it's a combination of the student, the parent and the teachers. However, there can also be other elements IMO. Funding cuts that mean special programs can no longer be run, or the hours of support staff are cut which means less one-to-one with students with academic or behavioural issues, which in turn impacts classes with need for stricter behaviour management. Or raising the age of compulsory education but also increasing compulsory subjects and minimizing vocational options for less engaged students. Increased class sizes. A crowded curriculum meaning less fat in the program for revision or extra time on certain concepts. Social media distraction and cyber bullying. Raising the cut off for diagnosis of learning issues in primary schools, meaning less opportunity for intervention, with a gap between struggling students and their classmates that increases exponentially every year. Lack of understanding of the real world relevance of some subjects. Lack of trust between families and schools meaning they don't always support each other to support the teen.

    It takes a lot, I think, for a teen to fall behind to the point where they can't catch up. But I think the warning signs are there for a long time as well.

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    I would say all three but mostly the child with the support of the parent. As a high school teacher I teach nearly 150 different students and there's no way I can closely monitor all of them - obviously if they fail assessment or don't submit assessment I contact parents but by that stage the student has already fallen behind.

    I agree that students need support in staying on top of homework and assessment but there's not much the teacher can do about a student's work ethic at home so I think the parents need to take a bigger role in supporting the student there.

    Sent from my HTC_PN071 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Yes, everyone should be involved. I would expect the teacher to notice first and let the parents know, then everyone including the teenager, needs to be involved in the solution. But ultimately, you can't make a teenager succeed if they don't want to put it any effort.


 

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