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  1. #21
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    I don't think expecting a 15yo to do one task is unreasonable but I will offer a but...
    Growing up, neither my sister or I had any jobs to do. Mum and dad did everything or the woman who looked after us did everything.
    Later on, when I was 13, my mum got sick and took time off work. Sister and I were both expected to do jobs - both of us resisted (I'm not proud of this at all)
    I don't think teens doing jobs is unreasonable at all, but it depends what happened in the years before they turned 15, how easily they'll take to doing those jobs.

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  3. #22
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    In our family we weren't given chores as kids. We took turns setting the table but didn't call it a chore..

    When I was 14 I started unpacking the dishwasher and my Dad paid me $5 a month. At 15 my Mum and my 3 siblings moved out so I helped Dad out with what I could. I didn't do washing until I was 18 but I did hang it out, bring it in and fold it before that age.

    I think you are going to have trouble getting her to start doing chores if she has never been the type to help out. Perhaps start with her doing her own washing. If she runs out of clothes she'll definitely want to start.

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    I think it depends on a lot of factors, and what other responsibilities they have.
    In general though, I think that every member of a household (including children) should contribute to its running. I think it's important that every person has their own responsibilities, and their own useful/productive place in the family.

    If it were my own child, and my expectations weren't met regarding contributing to the household, then I'd be dropping the things that they expect ME to do (washing, buying food the want, driving them places, etc.). Might be trickier with a partner's child though.

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    My 10 yr old and 7 yr old have more chores then that so no I don't think 1 chore is to much to ask. We have a laminated chore list in the kitchen that they have to do each day, they have to make their beds every morning and keep their rooms clean, they also have to empty their school bags and lunch boxes after school, take turns putting the dishes away as well as take turns at setting the table, they have to put away any clean clothes they have and get their school uniforms out for the next day. Each Sunday they start of with $5 each then each day if a chore is not done or they have been rude then money gets taken off the $5 and they get the left over total on Fridays. I don't think I ask to much of them and when they become teenagers I will add more chores but I will also increase the amount of starting money.
    Last edited by loodle; 26-08-2014 at 00:41.

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Party of Three View Post
    I came from a household where my mum didn't overload us with heaps of jobs. I would not expect my 15 year old to be contributing the house as much as an adult.
    When I was 15 I would come home from school and my sister and I alternated folding and putting away the washing and washing and drying the dishes after dinner (no dishwasher). That was it aside from the usual keeping your room tidy and looking after the pets. But at 15 I was also at school 5 days a week, working from 8-4 every Sunday and until 9pm one night during the week and doing the hours upon hours of hours of homework set. I didn't have much down time. I had friends at the same age who had to help out with the housework every week and cook dinners a certain amount of nights a week etc. I personally will be taking on my parent's approach to contributing to the household at that age. As an adult I really appreciate that my parents essentially still let me be a kid. I moved out of home just after my 18th birthday and never returned home. I was capable of doing it all, I just wasn't made to do it all.
    This is our home. My DD (16 years) has to keep her room clean, feed pets and sometimes her own ironing. She also works part time two nights a week and a 10 hour Saturday or Sunday plus Year 11. I think she does enough.

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    Op I think one chore is more than reasonable at 15.

    At 15 I was working part time 4 days a week. 5-9 two nights a week and full day shifts on the weekend. It was just my dad and I and he worked long hours as a truck driver to pay all the bills and my private pre university college. I would do all the cooking and cleaning and washing. As well as all my copious amounts of homework, I used to also have ton travel an hour each way to school. So my days started early amd finished late. As well as the part.time job I still managed to do everything and do extra curricular activities.

    In a way I'm glad I had this upbringing as it's taught me life skills, time management, hard work ethic and appreciation for everything I have.

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    I had to do more than 1 chore around the house when I was 15. I think it's completely reasonable to expect that a teen can help around the house, especially if they are receiving an allowance or pocket money.

    I also worked a casual job on weekends and school holidays so had that responsibility too.

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    DD is only 2.5 so who knows by that age, but when I was a teenager, my brother and I would clean up after dinner, Dad washed the dishes, I dried them and my brother swept the floors.

    We always used to take it in turns collecting the bins from all of the rooms and taking them out.

    But we never had any more 'Responsibilities' than that. We would always help our parents with what ever chore they were doing (like weeding, ganging out and taking in the washing) but beyond the above we didn't have set chores.

    Of course we had to keep our rooms tidy and put our dirty washing in the laundry.

    My Dad was an absolute clean freak and also thought our schooling / doing homework was the most important thing so we never did heaps. We weren't even allowed part time jobs.

    Once I got to uni, I would clean the house and do all the washing for some money before I got a part time job, so I at least knew how to do general household chores, whereas my brother didn't do an awful lit was hopeless by the time he left home.

    I think there needs to be a good balance really. Some of the PPs have some huge (in my opinion) expectations on their teenagers, but I think set chores and a variety of them is needed so teenagers learn to do these things, and know their parents aren't their slaves, but not in excess like some of the examples above.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    It's not palming off though, it's expecting all family members to contribute to the household. In most societies children are expected to do far more than the average Aussie kid. I actually think it helps foster a sense of belonging, responsibility and family obligation. Not to mention teaching valuable life skills and confidence through self-sufficiency.
    To me those things are equally as important as school work.
    Self sufficient is different to chores. All kids should be taught to be responsible for keeping their own bedrooms tidy, and for generally cleaning up after themselves, my dd is only 2.5 and we already practise this, put your toys away, put your shoes away, take your dirty clothes to the laundry.

    As I said bringing the washing off the line or unloading the dishwasher is one thing but housework, cleaning, vacuuming, ironing, I wouldn't get my daughter to do.

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    My 13yo SS is responsible for keeping his room tidy, making his bed, folding his clothes and putting them away, setting the table, taking his plates and dishes to the sink/dishwasher (this doesn't always go so well), helping carrying shopping bags, and generally helping out with any other tasks when he's asked - this might be occasional vacuuming, helping DH wash the car, etc. And, quite frankly, I think he could help with more given that he's taller and almost as strong as I am!

    Growing up, both of my parents worked full time and long hours. My sisters and I were expected to take on household chores - cooking dinner for the family, washing/ironing, general cleaning. I don't think there's anything wrong with everyone pitching in - to me that's what being part of a family is.


 

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