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  1. #11
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    I used to give Monday to Monday homework too Katie'sMum! So many kids had stuff on in the afternoons so it gave them a little more time. But it was only 3 days worth still.

  2. #12
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    You would be surprised who long it can take adhd with kid to get homework done. They are already exhausted by extra effort it takes to sit still in class and trying to learn. When they get home what would have taken them a hour in class easily take 4 or more hours to do at home. It just takes so much longer. Their meds are designed to stop being effective at 3 to 4 pm do that it out of system by 7 or 8 so they can sleep.

    Sadly amongst adhd community. Homework is one of our biggest issue with schools. That and finding a good ot to help the school and the child find strategies that help them to stay seated. Eg weight pads, water bottle cushions, pencil case on the floor. Breaks for star jumping or bouncing or even fit ball chairs.

  3. #13
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    I don't want to repeat what others have said so I will just say that I very strongly agree with anewme and Katie's Mum. It 'can' be beneficial but in order to be beneficial it should be deliberately set for a purpose with thought given to ability and time constraints, and not serve to induce anxiety and negative connotations.

    I once had a supervising teacher who said she never gave her students homework, her reasoning was it is her job to teach these concepts to her students in the appropriate way, it's what she was trained to do. For those students who had already grasped the concepts, there was no point forcing them to do it at home, and for the students who didn't understand, it wasn't appropriate to palm the job off onto their parents who may not have the time or be capable of teaching their kids.

    She gave them a weekly sheet with 'real life skills' that they could do at their own pace instead. Things like helping their parents cook a meal, set the table, wash up etc. She said it was more important for them to spend their time at home interacting with their family in a meaningful and authentic way. I thought she had a very good point and it was a pretty great idea.

  4. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Mama Mirabelle For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (21-08-2014),BH-KatiesMum  (21-08-2014),headoverfeet  (21-08-2014),Purple Lily  (21-08-2014),Renn  (21-08-2014)

  5. #14
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    My kids don't do homework. I have told their teacher if they are behind in an area to tell me and we will work on it at home. My middle child got some help with literacy the last two semesters at a special program at school so we did the required homework most nights.
    My kids don't need homework sheets to learn. If they tell me they need support with reading and writing then we get exciting and fun books that the kids like to listen to and just get them to start reading one sentence every couple of pages,we get a pen pal to write letters to, and we'll have family spelling bees in the car etc. If they need help with times tables we'll make up a game that uses times tables. If they need help with counting money we'll collect all the change we can find ask them to count it and once they have they can keep 10% of the coins or whatever, or I'll ask the child needing extra support to count out money for the lunch orders at canteen etc.
    I have once child in particular who chooses to do her homework, so she does it by choice, and I have one child who is now in primary (not infants) and I have asked her to do the one sheet the teacher sends home (takes her 10 minutes all up) to start to get in the habit for highschool. But ultimately no, I don't believe in a child sitting down at a desk doing homework every night...and when we looked for a school for our children we wanted one that also supported our stance.

    My kids do complete projects though...my oldest child recently made a power point presentation and presented it to her class. It was not graded and we had 6 weeks to complete it.

  6. #15
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    I have opinions from a variety of perspectives.

    As a parent I have seen DD get sent home with some mind bogglingly boring and IMO excessive homework. In pre- primary, 20 equations a night eg. 10+3, 10+5 etc. They were soooo repetitive, below her level, didn't support her learning, they were just a chore. She wanted to get her certificate, so she would do them, but it was so hard to support her when I felt they were unnecessary.

    Her current homework - nightly reader plus weekly maths task, 5 spelling words LCWC and preparation for share and chat, I feel is appropriate for year 1. She enjoys me helping her with the share and chat projects and they open into other discussions about science, technology etc. I'm pretty slack with the rest of it.

    We have activities 2 nights per week, OHSC 2 nights and our weekends are usually quite busy. I find it hard to fit in homework and I put a lot of value in her extra curricular activities.

    Having taught in upper primary, most parents who had older children in high school wanted their child to receive nightly homework. They expressed that their child needed that preparation for high school and those who were not used to doing homework found the transition a real shock.

    I was a straight A student and I remember a lot of projects in upper primary that had to be worked on at home. I'm a perfectionist, so loved it. I could have lots of time to make my assignments look exactly the way I wanted to with illustrations, borders etc.

    So I think for year 5 onwards, homework is a good idea, but not every night. I prefer weekly tasks as they allow for out of school commitments.

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  8. #16
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    Depending on the teaching style in the classroom I think it can be very important. From my time as a tutor, I found that home work was sometimes the first time a student was truly giving a certain type of problem a go on their own without assistance, which is the true test of whether that information has been properly learnt and understood.

    It is one thing to have half a go in class and wait for the teacher to run through the answers on the board and tick it off as 'learnt' and another to truly understand the concept and be able to execute it.

    If a child gets that opportunity in the classroom, then the homework still acts as reinforcement but isn't quite as critical to learning.

  9. #17
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    I am philosophically opposed to setting homework, particularly in junior/middle primary, however where I work, it is an expectation that we set it. I think it can further disadvantage some students, eg those with shift working parents or those who struggle to send their child to school regularly. It can make compliant students who through no fault of their own don't get to complete homework anxious, and it can make children scared of attending school. It can also add to tension between children and their parents, or parents and their teachers. I also find research type assignments inequitable as not all families have access to internet (although this is obviously getting less and less common). I never, ever punish a child for not completing homework, although I do have the expectation that they bring a note to say that homework hasn't been completed as a courtesy.

    As for the 'generic' type homework books. The teacher that I team teach with photocopies these and sends them home. She targets them for each student to be a year behind where they are at academically, so it acts as revision. What I like about this is that it means students can sit home and work independently, and there is no expectation of the parent to help them. This also may be the one time in the school day where they have felt on top of their understanding. I believe teachers are paid to teach and consolidate new learning, and parents should not have to shoulder this responsibility.

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  11. #18
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    I actually read a report from my old principal where they studied the pros/cons of homework and found it made no difference with improving the child's learning. (I'm primary school)
    Off to find it..... If I can!

    On a personal view though. . Being a classroom teacher..I actually think it's not worth the hassle for what it 'may' teach. I think reading and times tables at home is fantastic for primary school learners..... But that should be the parents getting involved in their kid's learning.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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  13. #19
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    thats the other thing @harvs that I really agree with.

    Homework should be EASY for them. It should be something the child can confidently and easily do on their own ... so its important that its set at the right level for each child.

    Building confidence in being able to do the work on their own without assistance is so incredibly important.

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    Way way way too much home work through the entire school life.


 

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