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  1. #21
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    Another reason could be because you need to be lying down with the epidural and being active walking etc seems to help things move along. Also because depending on how it works on you, you may not be able to feel the contraction and know when to push. And I also think epidurals may slow down contractions. Maybe check those ideas with your doctor next time

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    I think the epidural saved me from a c/s with my first baby. I was progressing very slowly despite intense contractions right on top of each other, so I had an epi so I could try to rest a bit or I would have been too exhausted to push. I started dilating much quicker after the epi. It was a forceps delivery as DD was in distress, but that was more likely due to the length of the labour.

    I had an epidural with DS as well (induction) and it was a normal delivery with no assistance required and an amazing experience.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starfish30 View Post
    Another reason could be because you need to be lying down with the epidural and being active walking etc seems to help things move along. Also because depending on how it works on you, you may not be able to feel the contraction and know when to push. And I also think epidurals may slow down contractions. Maybe check those ideas with your doctor next time
    I did actually ask those very questions because I thought so too but he didn't think it really made a difference, the last pushing stage is the problem apparently

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    Starfish30  (16-08-2014)

  5. #24
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    You are always going to get horror stories no matter what birth options you go for. I had an epidural 10 minutes after being induced. Contractions were thick and fast.
    Mine didn't quite wear off enough when I got to pushing star to feel everything but it took the edge off.
    I had an amazing private obstetrician and midwives who TOLD me when a contraction was coming via the monitor and told me to push and how to push til I could feel a bit more. I pushed for an hour, the last 10 minutes I could feel everything and DS was out. I had a tiny graze in the vaginal wall which they stitched up, breastfed DS and I was up having a shower and in our room 30 mins later!
    I'll definitely get an epi again!

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beta View Post
    I did actually ask those very questions because I thought so too but he didn't think it really made a difference, the last pushing stage is the problem apparently
    Having to stay laying on your back is a common misconception of epidurals, you are free to walk around and be active as long as you have a person either side to support you. I was walking around and even went to the loo a few times.
    The don't slow down contractions. What they can do is stall natural labour if you get one too early on but they usually won't let you have one from the get go unless it's an induction.
    FYI labouring in water (pool/bath/spa) will slow down your contractions much more than an epidural.

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    A-Squared  (20-08-2014)

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ponytail View Post
    Having to stay laying on your back is a common misconception of epidurals, you are free to walk around and be active as long as you have a person either side to support you. I was walking around and even went to the loo a few times.
    The don't slow down contractions. What they can do is stall natural labour if you get one too early on but they usually won't let you have one from the get go unless it's an induction.
    FYI labouring in water (pool/bath/spa) will slow down your contractions much more than an epidural.
    Not a misconception at all. You are talking about a walking or ambulatory epidural. Many hospitals don't offer this, even when they do you still may not be allowed I move. Standard epidurals leave you confined rto to the bed. Cannula and drip, catheter, heart rate monitor, blood pressure cuff, all meant being stuck on the bed.

    In answer to the OP, mh epidural meant complete loss of sensation. I had no idea how to push (no urge). Resulting in vacuum delivery which damaged my babies neck muscles. He needed 6m of physio to correct it.

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    misskittyfantastico  (15-08-2014)

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by darla87 View Post
    Not a misconception at all. You are talking about a walking or ambulatory epidural. Many hospitals don't offer this, even when they do you still may not be allowed I move. Standard epidurals leave you confined rto to the bed. Cannula and drip, catheter, heart rate monitor, blood pressure cuff, all meant being stuck on the bed.

    In answer to the OP, mh epidural meant complete loss of sensation. I had no idea how to push (no urge). Resulting in vacuum delivery which damaged my babies neck muscles. He needed 6m of physio to correct it.
    The hospital I was at didn't offer the walking epidurals but prefer to get you up to the toilet if you are able to instead of giving you a catheter, if I wasn't able to go naturally after them helping me to the loo they would have done the catheter. I had all the rest though I had to take my little drip trolley with me and had wireless sensors on for the contractions and bub. Just depends on the hospital and the staff on at the time as to what they do/don't allow. Just go with your instinct at the time OP, birth doesn't have to be scary

  11. #28
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    2 epi's & early inductions and 2 normal VB's. They don't always end up badly..


 

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