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  1. #1
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    Default No more spoon feeding (2 yo!!!)

    I am embarrassed to admit I have been spoon feeding my 2 yo and DH and I have decided to get our acts together to teach DD to self feed.

    DD used to be a great eater, she would eat any vegetable or meat when she was 14-15 months and didn't require us to spoon feed her, except for messy food like rice or spaghetti. Then it slowly went down hill... She started playing with food, would scoop up some rice and drop them on the floor, squashed the veggie and laughed, instead of allowing her to explore or taking her plate away, we started to take control of the situation by spoon feeding her main meals. At 18 months, Dd started childcare, she needed help initially at meal times but since she moved up to the toddler room 2 months ago she has been self feeding all meals and didn't need any assistant.

    We now know she is capable of using her hands, spoon and fork, a few days ago we decided to let her eat by herself. First day, DD did well with her breakfast (half a bowl of oats using a spoon, half an avocado with a fork), half a bowl of creamy tuna pasta and some yogurt for lunch, banana and a cup of milk for afternoon tea, a small plate of eggplant and mushroom for dinner, she refused the meatballs I made and the rice I guess not bad for first day but it is so much less than what she usually eats

    Last night she only ate mushroom and some steak. But ate a lot of fruits. During spoon fed phase she would usually eat half a cucumber, a big piece of chicken and a large bowl of mash potatoes I am not sure what to do. Is my toddler testing my boundary at the moment and thinks that I would go back to spoon feeding? Or she is not comfortable eating by herself? Could you share some of your experiences? We have been doing this for a few days, and she really doesn't eat much during lunch and dinner.

  2. #2
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    I believe most healthy children are capable of knowing how much they need to eat, without wanting to cause any distress I believe it can be easy to over feed a spoon fed child so perhaps she is just eating as much as she needs right now

    Give her a few days and see how she goes, as long as she is happy and as energetic as usual I wouldn't worry about it

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  4. #3
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    P.S no need to be embarrassed we all want healthy happy kiddies!

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    I agree with HOF, ids are great at knowing how much they need to eat I've found.

    My DD2 is a small eater. Most days she'll pick at a piece of toast for breakfast. have a tiny bowl of leftover for lunch and maybe eat half of what I serve for dinner... rarely snacks either, the odd bite of fruit. But then maybe once a week she'll outeat my 5 year old. I think by nature she's just a small eater. She's packing on the weight and is happy and healthy so I haven't seen cause for alarm yet

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    Thanks!! Our approach has always been if DD askes for more we would never refuse (to a reasonable limit of course). However the last few nights, I found DD eating more fruits, yogurt and milk after dinner. (Our dinner routine is always main meal, follow by fruit and yogurt, play and reading time, a cup of milk then sleep). I am not sure if I should limit the amount if fruits and yogurt? However it is not a lot more than what she usually askes for, but I am worried thus would make DD thinks she can always eats fruits and yogurt if she only has a few bites of veggie.

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    Well we have only done it for 5 days, and I know with this rate she us going she will definitely going to lose weight.... At the moment she is 90% of her weight so she does has a lot to lose, but when should we be alarmed?

  8. #7
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Maybe move the fruit and yogurts to a different time of the day? I've personally never been a fan of snacks/desert after dinner for kids as i've found a lot of people have this issue.

    Best to talk to your gp or chn about any weight issues

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    Quote Originally Posted by headoverfeet View Post
    Maybe move the fruit and yogurts to a different time of the day? I've personally never been a fan of snacks/desert after dinner for kids as i've found a lot of people have this issue.

    Best to talk to your gp or chn about any weight issues
    I would try this too. I've seen too many friends' and relative's kids fuss over dinner then scoff two bowls of yoghurt and fruit. They know it's coming, they know they won't go hungry if they don't eat dinner, so they only eat the parts of dinner they really like. My DD even knows who's house she gets fruit etc after dinner and holds out for it!

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    We can't really move the fruits to a different time as DD doesn't eat fruits for breakfast, doesn't get morning tea as she doesn't have breakfast until 9, then lunch at 12. Nap at 2, wake at 5... We tried to do fruits at 5:30 but it means she eats even less for dinner as she isn't hungry and if no fruits for one day she is constipated... *sigh

  11. #10
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Give her fruit and yoghurt after lunch


 

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