+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0

    Default 'Save our Sleep' routines and self-settling technique

    Hi Mums. Has anyone used the routines and/or self-settling technique from the 'save our sleep' books? If so - did you find them useful?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    1,914
    Thanks
    364
    Thanked
    1,502
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Yes from about 6m - 18m I found the routine a reasonably good guide and used some of the self settling techniques.

    We used the bits we felt comfortable with and that worked for DD, so we didn't follow the whole thing to the letter (and I think that logic works with most things when it comes to baby).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by GM01 View Post
    Yes from about 6m - 18m I found the routine a reasonably good guide and used some of the self settling techniques.
    Thanks so much for your response. I have a 12 week old who won't sleep during the day (never has, really). We are trying to follow the routine but struggling with the daytime sleeps. We do the initial period of self-settling -> leaving her for the 6 minutes before we go in and settle her, but the problem is she usually only sleeps for 10-20 minutes if she does go to sleep. Are we then supposed to let her cry another 6mins, or go in straight away - do you know? The book is kind of unclear, but implies that you just pick her up and say 'well done for having a sleep' - but she really hasn't had much sleep!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,689
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    I used the routines with my first who was a textbook bub and sleeping through until 7am (with a dreamfeed) by about 3 months. I've used the routines with my second who isn't quite as text book as my first but he's still a pretty good sleeper (5 months and sleeping through until 6amish without a dreamfeed). I didn't start using the routines with my bubs until about 8 weeks, I wanted to let bubs find their own way before then

    If you are a routines/organised person who likes predictability this may be the method for you. If you hate being pidgeon holed then you may struggle with following SOS. That's ok. There are other more attachment style parenting books on the market and some of them have good advice too.
    - On this point I think you are brave asking about SOS in here: it's usually something that draws intense criticism from the more attachment style parents *some* of whom: find it difficult to respect the fact that others have a different parenting style from them, havent read the book and are spreading Mis-information, or who pick on one flaw (yes like any book it's not without flaws I could list some myself) and use this to rubbish the rest. Whatever you do please use your common sense: I am a strong believer If something doesn't seem right for your bub don't do it. No-one blindly follows a parenting book 100% of the time.

    To help (and to save you buying the book when it may not be for you) below is a summary of what I think are the key principles of SOS. If there are any questions please feel free to ask me (in this thread or via PM).

    1. Read the whole book first. Many different parts (feeding, bedding, sleep times) are interconnected if you do one key thing and not another you could be shooting yourself in the foot.
    2. Routines: in particular timing sleeps for when bub is tired enough to sleep properly but not too tired.
    3. Bedding: you've got to get the bedding right. 9/10 when an older bub wakes around 4 or 5am it's because they are cold. I recommend a thermostat controlled heater if you can afford it.
    - Get the timings and bedding right and hopefully you won't have to spend much time on self settling.
    4. sleep aids: once a bub is about 6 weeks I would wind right back on the negative sleep aids (dummy, rocking/pAtting/feeding to sleep etc). If really needed do these until bub is drowsy but not asleep. Negative Sleep associations can cause cat napping and night wakenings.
    5. For sleep time use a breathable comforter with your smell on it.
    6. Self settling: the cruxt is if everything has been checked (nappy, wind, hunger) let bub grizzle for a bit but never leave an emotional cry unattended. If you can't tell the difference between a protest cry and an emotional cry there is guidance in the book and there are video's on You tube. If you still can't tell the difference that's ok but To be safe I wouldn't follow the self settling guidance. Note: despite what some critics claim the book does NOT promote the cry-it-out technique. That being said if you are not comfortable with any crying then this is probably not the right style for you.

    Good luck

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to VicPark For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (04-08-2014),GM01  (04-08-2014),Little Miss Sunshine  (04-08-2014),olismumma  (04-08-2014)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    1,914
    Thanks
    364
    Thanked
    1,502
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I would suggest that it's not necessarily a self settling issue if she's only sleeping 10-20 minutes, but rather something waking her (e.g. too hot, cold, hunger, discomfort). Self settling problems is when they sleep through one whole cycle (approx 45 minutes) but can't continue to a second because they stir through their natural sleep pattern and can't settle themselves.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to GM01 For This Useful Post:

    VicPark  (04-08-2014)

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,689
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Kea23 View Post
    Thanks so much for your response. I have a 12 week old who won't sleep during the day (never has, really). We are trying to follow the routine but struggling with the daytime sleeps. We do the initial period of self-settling -> leaving her for the 6 minutes before we go in and settle her, but the problem is she usually only sleeps for 10-20 minutes if she does go to sleep. Are we then supposed to let her cry another 6mins, or go in straight away - do you know? The book is kind of unclear, but implies that you just pick her up and say 'well done for having a sleep' - but she really hasn't had much sleep!
    Some thoughts:
    -Which routine are you on? You may need to go up or down a level.
    - Are you patting/rocking/feeding/playing music to sleep?. If so this can lead to cat napping. If you really need to do these things to help bub sleep just do them until bub is drowsy not asleep.
    - Does bub feel warm and toasty to touch? If not bub might be too cold.
    - are you swaddling bub?
    - Is bub doing a protest cry or emotional cry ? (Emotional: always go in to bub and go through the checklist: nappy, cold, wind etc). Re-wrap and put bub back to bed.
    - How did bub feed before hand? Some bubs need a top up feed before bed.
    - Once you go in to settle bub don't leave. At 12 weeks I would be popping bub into the pram/baby carrier to try and get an extra sleep cycle in. Once bub is a bit older if she can stay up to the next scheduled nap.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,689
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by GM01 View Post
    I would suggest that it's not necessarily a self settling issue if she's only sleeping 10-20 minutes, but rather something waking her (e.g. too hot, cold, hunger, discomfort). Self settling problems is when they sleep through one whole cycle (approx 45 minutes) but can't continue to a second because they stir through their natural sleep pattern and can't settle themselves.
    Totally agree.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Thanks everyone so much for your feedback. I'm really struggling with this one. The basics of the situation are:
    - She often will go to sleep but wake up around 20-30 minutes later (10 mins was probably an exaggeration - usually it would be 20-30 but that doesn't sound like a full sleep cycle so not sure).
    - At night she sometimes requires some settling at first, but then seems to be able to self-settle during the night as we don't really hear a peep out of her from when she goes to sleep until about 5 every morning, and then she seems to be napping on off from then until about 6:30 when we really start to hear her talking to herself etc.
    - During the day, however we have always struggled to get her to sleep, she will 'catnap', and is happy to drop off to sleep on my lap, in the carrier or pram - but for short periods. Even if she is completely droopy eyed, I can put her in the cot and she will still only sleep a little while before waking and starting to wriggle and cry (definitely protest crying).
    I'm really just at a loss with this one. Sometimes she will go down and sleep a couple of hours, but trying to follow the sleep times in the SOS routine, doesn't seem to be working - am I better off just using my judgement to decide when to put her down? Problem is - we are following the feed times in that routine too, so we would have to adjust those too.

    If she doesn't end up sleeping much during the day, she is a total tired wreck by the end of the day!

    Obviously this is my first bub so I'd really appreciate any advice/insight from those with more parenting experience than me. If you have any suggestions of things I could try to get her to sleep during the day, that would be appreciated!

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,689
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Hmmmm. Letting bub fall asleep anywhere and then transferring to the cot could be a problem. In between sleep cycles if bub notices something different (eg in cot when fell asleep on mums lap) then bub will crack it wondering where mums lap went.

    Try and put bub to sleep from the get go in the cot (or pram if you are out).

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,689
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Which routine are you on? If bub can't last the full period (sometimes with smaller bubs especially) then you might need to go down a routine.

    If bub can't last he period then you could either:
    - let bub have a quick 20 nap in the bouncer etc then put to bed at the scheduled time. Or
    - put bub to bed a little early (10 mins etc). IMO you are better off putting bub down a little early and over time working on extending this than letting bub fall asleep on you/carrier and then transferring.

    Bub is still young at 12 weeks, if you follow sleep times 60% of the time at the moment and work towards the rest over time then that's ok. Don't stress yourself you're doing great


 

Similar Threads

  1. Q for those who use routines incl feed/play/sleep
    By misho in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-04-2014, 17:49
  2. Save our sleep
    By SAgirl in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 356
    Last Post: 23-04-2014, 21:31
  3. Self settling and sleep routine HELP
    By mammacita13 in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 19-01-2014, 14:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
Transition into Parenthood / Calmbirth Sydney
Julie's Transition into Parenthood and Calmbirth courses for pregnant couples will get you ready, prepared and organised for the wonderful birth of your beautiful new baby. Birth Support Doula training provided in 2017 open to all. Call 0401 265 530
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!