+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 82
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by btmac View Post
    Hmmm not really on topic why do children under 5 need an 'education' ??? And a 'professional' and 'proper' one at that. This is exactly what is wrong with our system if you ask me - let children be children - sigh a whole other thread I know.

    Not totally directed at you ExcuseMyFrench but this is a common attitude/belief and it really bothers me a lot.
    I actually agree with you, but the first year of school now is quite demanding. Kinder teachers have said to me they can tell the ones that go to pre school and those that don't. I see it as a leg up and advantage, not just with adedemic stuff but with impulse control, understanding how a school day is structured etc.

    Note to self - pre school is the year before school, so 4 and 5yos.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    Blessedwith3boys  (22-07-2014),btmacxxx  (22-07-2014)

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,427
    Thanks
    497
    Thanked
    1,588
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I actually agree with you, but the first year of school now is quite demanding. Kinder teachers have said to me they can tell the ones that go to pre school and those that don't. I see it as a leg up and advantage, not just with adedemic stuff but with impulse control, understanding how a school day is structured etc.

    Note to self - pre school is the year before school, so 4 and 5yos.
    Yes I know, my son is in preschool, he starts his first year of school next year (Prep in QLD). I don't think that universal access is needed before the preschool year and the recommendations in the productivity commission support this, that there is no compelling evidence of a benefit for children attending child care/early education prior to preschool except for those with special needs or at risk of harm at home.

    And in QLD for kids who are born in the first half of the year, they start preschool at 3 and formal school (Prep) at 4.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to NoteToSelf For This Useful Post:

    peanutmonkey  (23-07-2014)

  5. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,023
    Thanks
    5,460
    Thanked
    4,397
    Reviews
    20
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Pre school is different than we were kids. It's really what kinder/prep was for us. They learn how to write their names, learn numbers, how to sit on the mat and have self control. Basic fine and gross motor skills. Early childhood teachers are just that, qualified teachers with degrees. There's much more to pre school now than just playing.
    Yeah I know, but it states that they're continuing to make pre school accessible to all children the year before they start school, so I thought she must have been talking about earlier than that which I don't see as necessary.

  6. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by btmac View Post
    Self control comes (bar special needs children) when it is developmentally appropriate, as does the ability to learn to read and write - I just do not understand this push to have 4 year olds sitting like little ducks in a row on a mat being quiet and learning how to write their own names!

    Look to the Scandinavian countries which have some of the highest rankings in the OECD for educational levels and they have no formal schooling before 7!!!
    The reason the Scandinavian countries are top of the educational ladder is so much more complex than starting school at 7. They have huge amounts of funding, teachers are paid very well so stay. They come from much more of a strengths approach than a deficits approach which is the traditional way in other western countries (although that's changing here). They also are not fussed on standardised testing.

    I don't think childcare, before the year before school shouldn't be necessarily a right as far as subsiding. But there is value to pre school. Yes you can teach your kids to write their name and sit quietly, but there is more to it than that. If teaching was something that didn't require formal education then pre schools and schools in general wouldn't exist.

    As a pre service teacher myself, I was shocked how detailed the process is to teach basic skills in a correct way in which it sticks, and can be built upon.
    Last edited by delirium; 22-07-2014 at 15:44.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    btmacxxx  (22-07-2014),EvilWombatQueen  (24-07-2014)

  8. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by redlipsandpearls View Post
    Yeah I know, but it states that they're continuing to make pre school accessible to all children the year before they start school, so I thought she must have been talking about earlier than that which I don't see as necessary.
    I re read your post as 'the pre school years' and realised you didn't mean pre school age, but more toddler (1-3) age.

  9. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,023
    Thanks
    5,460
    Thanked
    4,397
    Reviews
    20
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I re read your post as 'the pre school years' and realised you didn't mean pre school age, but more toddler (1-3) age.
    Yeah sorry, I probably wasn't very clear.

  10. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,316
    Thanks
    1,551
    Thanked
    2,536
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    918 pages??? I can't read that! Where's the cheats table that says what CCR someone will get based on their income?
    haha fair enough!
    here VP

    ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1406009118.535011.jpg

  11. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,316
    Thanks
    1,551
    Thanked
    2,536
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by btmac View Post
    Self control comes (bar special needs children) when it is developmentally appropriate, as does the ability to learn to read and write - I just do not understand this push to have 4 year olds sitting like little ducks in a row on a mat being quiet and learning how to write their own names!

    Look to the Scandinavian countries which have some of the highest rankings in the OECD for educational levels and they have no formal schooling before 7!!!
    Well in Sweden they have free preschooling for kids aged 4 and 5. There is a very high attendance rate (97%).

    They don't sit like little ducks in a row either

    I started school at 3yo like all other French kids and loved it. Our "ecole maternelle" is free and of high quality, Kids play and have a nap. It is the same as an early education centre here, a (very) glorified childcare if you like.

    And yes I believe it is a great opportunity for most children.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to ExcuseMyFrench For This Useful Post:

    btmacxxx  (22-07-2014)

  13. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,721
    Thanks
    1,518
    Thanked
    1,950
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    With regard to the childcare subsidies for non-working parents (SAHM):

    I work casually. Good money when I work, but an average of fewer than 8 hours per week. However, DD has a regular 1/2 day per week at childcare for two reasons - so that I can have a break, and so that she's used to the place in case I get work. Here's what would happen if it weren't subsidised:

    1. I wouldn't get a break. At all. DP runs his own business and works incredibly long hours. If I couldn't put DD in child care for a low cost, my only option would be to leave her with DP. I'd feel too guilty about lowering his productivity, so it wouldn't happen. Cue a much worse home environment for DD with me being extremely stressed.

    2. I wouldn't work. Either that, or the days that I worked then DP couldn't.
    If I couldn't have DD in care cheaply, I couldn't afford to send her to keep up a relationship with the carers. I wouldn't be comfortable sticking her in completely out of the blue. Hence, I'd either not work at all or she'd be cared for by DP when I worked. Essentially trading off my work for his.

    So in our situation, a lack of subsidised care would mean less workforce participation and less economic productivity from our household.

    I understand the reasons for that recommendation, but it seems too simplistic to me. There must be plenty of cases like ours where the entire community benefits from SAHMs having access to some subsidised child care.

  14. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,525
    Thanks
    1,890
    Thanked
    2,539
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I actually agree with you, but the first year of school now is quite demanding. Kinder teachers have said to me they can tell the ones that go to pre school and those that don't. I see it as a leg up and advantage, not just with adedemic stuff but with impulse control, understanding how a school day is structured s.
    Pi think that's very true, but I find it so sad! I find it sad that kids are so busy these days from the time they're babies.... Why? Why is the first year of school demanding on little ones? I don't think it should be, at all.

    sorry off topic a bit but I do find it sad that society these days mostly can't afford for at least one parent to stay home a lot more than we do. A big part of that is the lack of flexibility in workplaces I know, for both mums and dads. They're only so little once - they have the rest of their lives to be busy and having a life away from us (parents).

  15. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ellewood For This Useful Post:

    btmacxxx  (22-07-2014),jez  (28-07-2014),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (23-07-2014)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Opk tested please help!
    By muzzy in forum Conception & Fertility General Chat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 25-04-2014, 17:21
  2. Just tested pregnant with home test - scared of cancer
    By whitetea in forum Conception & Fertility General Chat
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 15-11-2013, 18:32
  3. Spin off: Do you live within your means?
    By Pregalicious in forum General Chat
    Replies: 117
    Last Post: 08-11-2013, 23:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pebblebee
Parents spend hours looking for things they need NOW. The keys, the remote, darling daughter's treasured teddy. Stop wasting precious time looking & start finding with Bub Hub reviewed Pebblebee Smart Tag. Simply attach a Pebblebee and find it fast.
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
Baby Monitors
Looking to buy a baby monitor? :: Read viewer reviews of baby monitors BEFORE you buy :: Buy at a local or online Baby Nursery Shop
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!