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  1. #11
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    I've always resigned in person, with a cover letter that way it's in writing you can personally say I quit then hand the letter for the rest. Maybe bring DD along just before nap time so you have an excuse to leave lol.

    OP you financially may not need to work, but I'm a big believer in keeping your foot in the door. I know a lot of women who quit completely then spent a few years out of the workforce and are now struggling to get back in now the kids are grown up. Could you reduce hours or take unpaid leave ?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Two wrongs don't make a right. Regardless of their employment status (permanent/casual) I think it's off for someone to give an employer no notice (or just 1 weeks notice) especially if their reasons for leaving work aren't that dire.
    With all due respect, it's honestly NOT her problem in regards to the company finding a replacement. She is within her rights to give the minimum notice period if she wishes. Of course, like I said previously, I'm sure they'd appreciate her staying longer, but she's not obliged to.

    The person who I replaced in my job (I'm full time in real estate) had resigned and although she had planned to stay two weeks she ended up leaving after I'd been there a week as she was totally over it. Once a person resigns it isn't always the best thing to keep them on as sometimes their heart isn't in it anymore and they don't work very effectively anyway.

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  4. #13
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    I would resign in person with a letter. Thank them for the opportunity but at this time it is best for your family that you stay at home, explain that you would like to leave immediately however you are willing to give 2 weeks notice if required.

    They may tell you not to worry about the notice, but I think it's important professionally to offer 2 weeks. As pp's have said, they were kind enough to give you the position and you never know what the future holds, best not to burn bridges.

  5. #14
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    If you have a notice period, you need to give notice for that period yes. But you are casual? So presumably no notice period, in which case you can resign/quit straight away if you wish.

    I have little sympathy for companies and organisations who increasingly hire casuals and contractors/temps yet expect them to have the same commitments to the employer that permanent staff do. I've seen employers increasingly replacing permanent staff with contract staff (and I myself have done heaps of contract work) without all the benefits of perm staff so they need to suck it up if it's inconvenient to them when they are only given the minimum notice period when people leave.

    I think handing in a written resignation with the minimum (no?) notice period is perfectly adequate OP.

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  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Two wrongs don't make a right. Regardless of their employment status (permanent/casual) I think it's off for someone to give an employer no notice (or just 1 weeks notice) especially if their reasons for leaving work aren't that dire.
    Yes but she is casual - employers know full well that hiring casuals means adding a 'dynamic' element to the workplace. They don't get the benefits of permanent staff, no leave, and variable work hours and conditions. If they want commitment and consistency they hire perm staff. Employers know casuals can be there one day and gone the next.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Really??? How about OP being "kind" enough to work for them????
    Whatever, probably wrong choice of words.

    At the end of the day, if she doesn't care what they think of her & isn't worried about burning bridges then send an SMS and don't go back. Pretty simple really, it just depends on what kind of person she wants to be.

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  10. #17
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    I do think it's always better to give notice and do it properly no matter your employment status yes, especially if the employer has gone out of their way to accommodate you in the role.

  11. #18
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    Double post

  12. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    With all due respect, it's honestly NOT her problem in regards to the company finding a replacement. She is within her rights to give the minimum notice period if she wishes. Of course, like I said previously, I'm sure they'd appreciate her staying longer, but she's not obliged to.

    The person who I replaced in my job (I'm full time in real estate) had resigned and although she had planned to stay two weeks she ended up leaving after I'd been there a week as she was totally over it. Once a person resigns it isn't always the best thing to keep them on as sometimes their heart isn't in it anymore and they don't work very effectively anyway.
    Sure, within their rights to leave with minimum or short notice, but it's also that employer's right to give a lukewarm reference should you need a job down the track. Like I said, it depends on how much you care about keeping people onside should you need a job there or somewhere else down the track. Circumstances change.

  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by clbj View Post
    Sure, within their rights to leave with minimum or short notice, but it's also that employer's right to give a lukewarm reference should you need a job down the track. Like I said, it depends on how much you care about keeping people onside should you need a job there or somewhere else down the track. Circumstances change.
    It would be pretty poor form for an employer to give someone a bad reference for not staying longer than the required notice period! It's a bizarre reason to give a poor reference.

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