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  1. #1
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    Default How do I quit?

    After my mat leave ended from having dd I went back to work FT. It didn't suit me or my family and we all hated it.. So I took PT work elsewhere to help ease the budget and find the family work balance, so I have been employed casually for the last 6months.

    I like working there and the people are nice. But DF has since also changed the way in which he works and financially I don't need to work anymore.
    DF is happy either way but I think I would be happier not working for now.

    But. I don't know how to quit. I've never resigned from a job because I don't need to work. It's always been for the betterment of my career. I feel bad for my work mates since we get on well but I don't enjoy being there and would rather be spending time with my kids. I'm just being a bit of a sook. But I don't like confrontation and don't know how to tell them I won't be coming back for my next shift. I've never been one to give up a job after such a short time. My shortest job before this was well over 2yrs.

    I know a while ago they had financial issues and all the casuals were the first to be fired .. So they have to expect that being a casual it works both ways. I just feel bad knowing my absence will cause my coworkers a bit of hassle since they will be one person down.

    Can I just send an email or is that a bit pathetic? I'm a bit of a chicken and don't want to do it in person. I'm concerned that if they ask me to work on a bit longer or until they find someone else I won't know how to say no. I'm so sh't under pressure like that.
    Last edited by MadeWithLove; 05-07-2014 at 21:11.

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    Since there's no real reason for you quitting couldn't you stay on a bit? Give them notice that you're not available for any more work in a few weeks time? If you just quit without turning up for your next shift it might burn a bridge, you could need them again one day.

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    I think you should give notice and definitely need to do it in person. If you give some notice (even if you aren't required to) you won't be leaving them short which will relieve some of your guilt. I am sure that they have had people leave before and it shouldn't be a big deal - though I know it feels big to you.

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    you need to do it in person. In writing - but hand it to your supervisor in person.

    They will understand. Peoples circumstances change all the time, and you have to do what is right for you.

    Quitting to spend more time with your family is a perfectly acceptable reason


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    Give notice And tell your boss in person. You might want a reference from them one day if you do have to go back to work (eg if your hubby's situation changes or he can't/doesn't want to work longer? hours anymore).

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    We are all replaceable in our jobs! If it's the right thing for you and your family you need to bite the bullet and just do it. In person.

    I resigned recently after just two weeks in a job because the drive to and from work wasn't working with daycare or after school care hours (45 minutes each way). Plus it turned out my boss way a stupid cow, so I had to do it. But because I was quite intimidated by her and felt bad about doing it to her, I felt physically sick the day I resigned. I so wanted to just text her and tell her but knew that would be wrong.

    It's hard, but you've gotta do what's right for you. If you've been there less than a year you are only required to give one week's notice, but of course I'm sure they would appreciate two weeks if possible.

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    Why not speak to your supervisor and hand them a letter with your resignation, but offering to stay on as long as it takes to hire and train your replacement? That way you aren't leaving them in the lurch. If you leave on good terms, then hopefully they will rehire or give you a good reference if you need it in the future.

    Good luck. I hate resigning too, even from jobs I don't like.

    Oops, just read that you don't want to stay on whilst they fill the role. Maybe resign, say you would be happy to stay and help cover the role until your your replacement is on board but that you need to be finished by x date (say 4-6 weeks, less if you want) because if a family commitment. You don't have to say what that is, and hopefully they will have someone to replace you before then unless it's a very hard job to fill. I would think in most jobs it would be tricky to advertise, interview and train a replacement in 1-2 weeks, but 4 weeks should be sufficient and it keeps the end in sight for you. I guess it depends on how much you care about a future job reference.
    Good luck - hopefully it's not that bad!

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    Double post
    Last edited by clbj; 06-07-2014 at 13:07.

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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    It's a casual position, that's not OP's problem to worry about.

    As long OP does in it person with it in writing then that's all she needs to worry about. Up to her if she wants to give notice or not, she's not obligated to.

    If the tables were turned they wouldn't have any problems give OP minimal notice and wouldn't care if it took her 4-6 weeks to find another job.
    Two wrongs don't make a right. Regardless of their employment status (permanent/casual) I think it's off for someone to give an employer no notice (or just 1 weeks notice) especially if their reasons for leaving work aren't that dire.

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    Always resign in person. It's rude not to.

    I'd also be giving notice, rather than just saying 'oh hey, I'm off... too bad for you'. It's really not fair to your employer and colleagues that are going to have to pick up your slack. They gave you the opportunity when you needed more money, don't throw it in their face.

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