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  1. #11
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    My son wasn't diagnosed until he was 6 he almost got expelled in kindergarten, the way he was at school and the way he was at home was 100% different so it was a shock to us.

  2. #12
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    I agree with pp.
    If you have a feeling then definitely follow it up. Plus you've got nothing to lose (well except $$) and everything to gain with help and early intervention.
    I can recommend the pediatricians at Leading Steps at Pindara. They are amazing and very supportive.
    Good luck with everything.

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    Last edited by Tamtam; 02-07-2014 at 18:19.

  3. #13
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Can i just dispel a myth that i see a lot?

    I have two sons with moderate autism.

    One is VERY affectionate. Even somewhat over bearing with it sometimes.

    The other is affectionate but on his terms and thats due to his sensory processing disorder and being over sensitive to touch

    Children with autism (but perhaps not for very severe) are extremely loving children.

    Not having a go at anyone.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zombie_eyes View Post
    Can i just dispel a myth that i see a lot?

    I have two sons with moderate autism.

    One is VERY affectionate. Even somewhat over bearing with it sometimes.

    The other is affectionate but on his terms and thats due to his sensory processing disorder and being over sensitive to touch

    Children with autism (but perhaps not for very severe) are extremely loving children.

    Not having a go at anyone.
    Thank you.
    My dd is extremely affectionate. She is touch seeking. He needs deep touch and needs lots of hugs.



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    Bluebirdgirl  (02-07-2014)

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    Pp that said about asd kids not being affectionate,

    Yes! This one irritates me the most I think. For the general population not anyone here. Also eye contact, neither of my sons have any problem with eye contact. One is mildly autistic and one moderately.
    I agree with pp that it's best to seek any help you feel comfortable with early on. I missed out with help with my first. I'll never know if things could have been better for him. He wasn't diagnosed til he was 7.
    My second son was 4 and we have been able to access govt funding for him.
    My first son I knew from infancy he was differnt but my second son I only started to wonder when he wasn't talking much. Even after that I thought it might have just been a language delay until he turned 4 and other classic asd symptoms started coming out.
    Last edited by Bluebirdgirl; 02-07-2014 at 16:08.

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    My DS is another who is very affectionate and has no issues with eye contact either.
    It's definitely not always the case when it comes to autism.

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  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zombie_eyes View Post
    Can i just dispel a myth that i see a lot?

    I have two sons with moderate autism.

    One is VERY affectionate. Even somewhat over bearing with it sometimes.

    The other is affectionate but on his terms and thats due to his sensory processing disorder and being over sensitive to touch

    Children with autism (but perhaps not for very severe) are extremely loving children.

    Not having a go at anyone.
    Sorry, I didn't mean it like that, I was coming from a personal POV. I never wanted affection as a child, and still struggle with eye contact.

  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zombie_eyes View Post
    Can i just dispel a myth that i see a lot?

    I have two sons with moderate autism.

    One is VERY affectionate. Even somewhat over bearing with it sometimes.

    The other is affectionate but on his terms and thats due to his sensory processing disorder and being over sensitive to touch

    Children with autism (but perhaps not for very severe) are extremely loving children.

    Not having a go at anyone.
    Very true my ds in preschool when he was having a meltdown his teacher would give him a massive tight hug and it was the only thing that would calm him down.

    My son was diagnosed just before his 5th birthday with asd and just before his 6th birthday with ADHD. It was a long road to get there though. Looking back now the signs were there from a young age but due to him being born very sick with a heart condition and undergoing open heart surgery as well as being tongue tied I thought nothing of it. It wasn't until he started preschool that the drama began and like a previous poster said ds behaviour at school is 100percent opposite to his at home behaviour I think that's why it took my husband a long time to switch on that something was up as he is working all day and isn't doing to drop offs or pick ups and isn't seeing ds struggling to interact with any of the kids and running away to his own space only to lash out if any child dares to go near him.

  11. #19
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    Thank you so much to everyone who has offered advice, I think I'm going to get the ball rolling. DF can like it or ignore it. Should I see a paed first or go straight to a psychologist (although I've been told psychiatrist)?

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  13. #20
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    See your GP for a referral. You can go to either a paed or psychologist. For my DS I got a mental health care plan and went to a psych.
    After all the dodgy specialists we've seen, I recommend doing some research first on the specialists in your area, when you've got an idea of a good one go to your GP and ask for a referral to them.

    The first assessment I had done cost $1300 and it was wrong. So went to see a paed who charged $375 first session and $180 second session. He agreed DS's diagnosis was wrong and said it needed changing. He was going to contact the psych and school to get the diagnosis updated and the ball rolling for support...blah blah..he did absolutely nothing but was happy to put his hand out and take my money. Thankfully when the diagnosis was eventually reviewed, it was covered by our funding and didn't cost, but after this dreadful run around, I do recommend you be wary of the dodgy speacialists out there.

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