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  1. #1
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    Default Autism - did you know early on?

    DS is 20 months and after a check up with his GP today she isn't happy with his speech. I haven't been too worried as he seems to understand a lot and wasn't going to even think about it until he was at least 2 but because he isn't saying x amount of words of course he's being seen as delayed and we have to go back in a month.

    I have a HFA, my brother is Aspergers with SPD and my partner's Father is also an Aspie. The genes are there and it's always been in the back of my mind that having a child on the ASD was a possibility.

    DS mostly says Dada along with a lot of jibberish, says ta when he wants something, woowoo when he sees a dog and has started to quack when he sees ducks. He occasionally says what sounds like an angry mumma when he's pushing his cars around. He won't repeat any words I say. He understands a fair bit. Shower time and he runs to the bathroom, if I ask if he wants water he will find his water bottle, if I ask if he wants num nums he will sit at his table or go to the fridge. He'll also sit at the table if I ask him to. He loves spinning wheels and inside the washing machine and will happily do it for an hour. Loves pouring water and running taps, doesn't like the feel of playdough and won't eat any mashed foods. He often spins in circles, walks on his toes and I've caught him quite a few times flapping his hands. He also often seems to be in his own world and if I try and talk to him while he's focussed on something I get ignored. He also throws some brilliant tantrums and if he's upset with being told no he will hit his hands/arms against something near him quite a few times or will throw what is in his hand. He's obsessed with turning lights on and off, ceiling fans and points every light and fan out when we're at the shops.
    He doesn't line toys up, isn't hung up on routine, will hug and kiss me, has great eye contact and most of the time (if he isn't focussed) responds to his name.

    Am I just over thinking it because of today given he's not even 2, or is it worth getting him assessed now? I know we can all display traits of Autism, but my mummy senses are starting to really tingle.

    Sorry for the long post... TIA x
    Last edited by callmedragon22; 01-07-2014 at 23:19.

  2. #2
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    My daughter wasnt diagnosed until just before she turned 6. She has missed out on so much early intervention that would have really helped her. If you tingle - follow your instinct. Im sorry I never did earlier. Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raising Leprechauns View Post
    My daughter wasnt diagnosed until just before she turned 6. She has missed out on so much early intervention that would have really helped her. If you tingle - follow your instinct. Im sorry I never did earlier. Good luck.
    Thanks DF doesn't even want to listen to me so struggling on whether to act yet or just wait a year.

    Bump for the night crowd!

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    I knew there was something not right, but didn't know what (I had no knowledge of ASD). In hindsight I can see all the signs from one week old!

    As for pushing early intervention, I have no idea. I struggled for years and years to get someone to listen to me; my DS1 was finally diagnosed with Aspergers when he was 9yo, so I really don't know what early intervention has to offer.
    I have been told by health professionals that I deal with that it is difficult to get diagnosed at such a young age, though I know that some Hubbers have had early diagnoses. Personally I would at least wait until 2yo, then re-assess what you want/need to do.

    Good luck.

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    callmedragon22  (01-07-2014)

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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Hi

    So as you know im on the spectrum and my two sons are and theres a good chance my daughter is as well, our psych has pointed out she shows some traits already at 18 months

    I'll be honest, from the things you say.. I'd be on alert. Write everything down and if u can record quirky behaviour or whopper meltdowns on your phone so you can show professionals later on if need be.

    How is he with people and other kids?

    Like pp, my ds#1 wasnt dx until 6 and we missed out on a lot of intervention (although he did see a speechy for years)

    Where as my ds#2 was dx a couple of months after his 2nd birthday and we have been overwhelmed with intervention and he has come so so far.

    Dont doubt yourself. I convinced myself that ds#1 was fine, just a language disorder and i still carry guilt that i let fear stop me from getting a dx until so late.

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    I think with my DS he was always a bit different to his brother but that was the only comparison I had to draw. I guess as he got older, issues became more obvious. Generally it was always written off as bad behaviour/bad parenting though.
    I spent over a year a year seeking referrals to specialists and being knocked back. I finally had some luck when DS started at a new daycare and the carers did up a letter outlining all concerns. We were finally accepted by a psych and got a mild autism diagnosis at 5 years. That was pretty much deemed wrong/inadequate straight away, so the process of seeking yet another diagnosis began...we have only finally had it done and had the diagnosis lifted to moderate with ADHD.
    We got just over a year of early intervention funding. It's only just been cut off as we were transitioned to the NDIS. The funding through the NDIS goes beyond the age of 7 though.

    I don't see any harm in seeking a diagnosis at such a young age. It can be such a lengthy process that getting in early might be your best bet. I've been advised that specialists will often under diagnose out of fear of getting it wrong. I guess this could be what happened with my DS. It had real negative implications as his old diagnosis isn't even recognised by the education department meaning that he got no support what so ever at school. He hasn't coped well the whole time he has been there and because the school get no financial benefits, they've simply written DS off as a bad child.

    In your situation, definitely document any strange or concerning behaviours as it's so hard when you are on the spot trying to remember everything to answer the specialists questions. Also if you use daycare or do in the future, have them document everything they notice as well.

    Good luck with it all.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    callmedragon22  (01-07-2014)

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    With the concerns you listed in your OP, I would be seeing to getting him assessed. There can only be benefits in being diagnosed earlier rather than later, should he end up on the spectrum.

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    callmedragon22  (01-07-2014)

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    Thank you so much for all your replies! I really really appreciate it. I haven't stopped thinking about it all day, and after a major meltdown at the shops today along a lot of smacking (him to me!) my brain feels like it's in overload atm.

    DF doesn't even want to talk about it. He just thinks I'm trying to label him and all he is is a late talker. His Dad wasn't diagnosed until adulthood so he doesn't understand ASD and as I'm the primary caregiver (he works nights and sleeps until late afternoon) he doesn't really see or deal with DS like I do. So I have no idea how I'm meant to work around that!

    Can you get a mental health plan for a toddler? I have no idea how I'll afford the psychiatrist appointment but I'm thinking that'll be easier than waiting for a paed first?


    Quote Originally Posted by Zombie_eyes View Post
    Hi

    So as you know im on the spectrum and my two sons are and theres a good chance my daughter is as well, our psych has pointed out she shows some traits already at 18 months

    I'll be honest, from the things you say.. I'd be on alert. Write everything down and if u can record quirky behaviour or whopper meltdowns on your phone so you can show professionals later on if need be.

    How is he with people and other kids?

    Like pp, my ds#1 wasnt dx until 6 and we missed out on a lot of intervention (although he did see a speechy for years)

    Where as my ds#2 was dx a couple of months after his 2nd birthday and we have been overwhelmed with intervention and he has come so so far.

    Dont doubt yourself. I convinced myself that ds#1 was fine, just a language disorder and i still carry guilt that i let fear stop me from getting a dx until so late.
    Zombie_eyes he usually plays well around other kids. He interacts with them, wants them to follow him if he goes off somewhere and loves to play chasey but he also often ignores them and plays on his own. He's got a best friend who he sees about twice a week, they know each other well, recognise each other over facetime etc and gets so excited when he sees her. But she often loves to hug him, grab his hand, etc and he gets very uncomfortable and will almost growl or hit if he isn't happy. And she'll follow him around like a puppy and he won't take any notice. So I suppose it depends on the day?
    I'll definitely start recording stuff, that's a brilliant idea.


    Quote Originally Posted by HarvestMoon View Post
    I think with my DS he was always a bit different to his brother but that was the only comparison I had to draw. I guess as he got older, issues became more obvious. Generally it was always written off as bad behaviour/bad parenting though.
    I spent over a year a year seeking referrals to specialists and being knocked back. I finally had some luck when DS started at a new daycare and the carers did up a letter outlining all concerns. We were finally accepted by a psych and got a mild autism diagnosis at 5 years. That was pretty much deemed wrong/inadequate straight away, so the process of seeking yet another diagnosis began...we have only finally had it done and had the diagnosis lifted to moderate with ADHD.
    We got just over a year of early intervention funding. It's only just been cut off as we were transitioned to the NDIS. The funding through the NDIS goes beyond the age of 7 though.

    I don't see any harm in seeking a diagnosis at such a young age. It can be such a lengthy process that getting in early might be your best bet. I've been advised that specialists will often under diagnose out of fear of getting it wrong. I guess this could be what happened with my DS. It had real negative implications as his old diagnosis isn't even recognised by the education department meaning that he got no support what so ever at school. He hasn't coped well the whole time he has been there and because the school get no financial benefits, they've simply written DS off as a bad child.

    In your situation, definitely document any strange or concerning behaviours as it's so hard when you are on the spot trying to remember everything to answer the specialists questions. Also if you use daycare or do in the future, have them document everything they notice as well.

    Good luck with it all.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app
    That's so awful, to finally get somewhere just to find out it's wrong! So sorry you went through that. I hope he's doing better now with his new diagnosis! Thank you for the advice x


    Quote Originally Posted by Barnaby View Post
    With the concerns you listed in your OP, I would be seeing to getting him assessed. There can only be benefits in being diagnosed earlier rather than later, should he end up on the spectrum.
    Thank you, yes that's how I feel I suppose I just needed reassurance that I wasn't just imaging it.

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    I have similar concerns but am holding off until our boy turns 2; he's 21 months. I'll highlight what he does that is the same. But we've had a GP checkup at 18 months and nothing was said so... I dunno!

    So ditto to...
    - won't repeat any words I say
    - a lot of jibberish (doesn't say 'ta')
    - voof when he sees a dog and has started to quack when he sees ducks (and make a few other animal noises)
    - He'll also sit at the table if I ask him to. He loves spinning wheels
    - Loves pouring water and running taps
    - likes (not obsessed) turning lights on and off, ceiling fans and points every light and fan out when we're at the shops
    - He doesn't line toys up, isn't hung up on routine, will hug and kiss me, has great eye contact and most of the time (if he isn't focussed) responds to his name.

    Exceptions to the above - he *is* hung up on routine and he freaks out when strangers interact with him.

    And he doesn't spin, or walk on his toes but he only started walking a couple months ago.

    So I'd be interested to hear how your follow up goes.

    Quote Originally Posted by callmedragon22 View Post
    DS mostly says Dada along with a lot of jibberish, says ta when he wants something, woowoo when he sees a dog and has started to quack when he sees ducks. He occasionally says what sounds like an angry mumma when he's pushing his cars around. He won't repeat any words I say. He understands a fair bit. Shower time and he runs to the bathroom, if I ask if he wants water he will find his water bottle, if I ask if he wants num nums he will sit at his table or go to the fridge. He'll also sit at the table if I ask him to. He loves spinning wheels and inside the washing machine and will happily do it for an hour. Loves pouring water and running taps, doesn't like the feel of playdough and won't eat any mashed foods. He often spins in circles, walks on his toes and I've caught him quite a few times flapping his hands. He also often seems to be in his own world and if I try and talk to him while he's focussed on something I get ignored. He also throws some brilliant tantrums and if he's upset with being told no he will hit his hands/arms against something near him quite a few times or will throw what is in his hand. He's obsessed with turning lights on and off, ceiling fans and points every light and fan out when we're at the shops.
    He doesn't line toys up, isn't hung up on routine, will hug and kiss me, has great eye contact and most of the time (if he isn't focussed) responds to his name.

    Am I just over thinking it because of today given he's not even 2, or is it worth getting him assessed now? I know we can all display traits of Autism, but my mummy senses are starting to really tingle.

    Sorry for the long post... TIA x

  15. #10
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    OP, considering the waiting time involved in seeing a paed or other professional services, it wouldn't hurt to get the ball rolling now. To give you an idea, I got a referral to a paed for my DS in early May (he's 3) and his appointment isn't until mid September.

    It's not that there are any 'red flags' in what you have posted, but your intuition as a mother is enough to warrant looking into getting him assessed.

    As for your DF being in denial, I think that's pretty normal. It's hard to acknowledge that your child may have difficulties. It's natural for people to dismiss when they are under 2, because they're still so little. I think it can be extra difficult for a father to acknowledge their boy may be on the spectrum.


 

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