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  1. #11
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    What practical suggestions from the BH green thumbs. I'm excited to get started.

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    HillDweller  (27-06-2014)

  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piyamj View Post
    What practical suggestions from the BH green thumbs. I'm excited to get started.
    I'm excited for you! I love my little herb garden. I'm out there most days, either grabbing what I need, watering/fertilising, or trimming back dead bits - frustrated gardener without a proper garden.

    As others have said, seedlings are the already established plants just a couple of inches high. They are super quick to grow.

    You can do a lot on a balcony garden. I live in an inner city apartment with one large balcony and one small balcony, both covered with pots. In that space I have 3 types of chillies, regular basil, Thai basil, garlic chives, thyme, Gallipoli rosemary (low growing creeping variety), regular rosemary, sage, oregano, parsley, coriander, 3 types of lettuce, mint, and a bay tree (this is something that loves growing in a pot!), plus the violas and marigolds to bring the good insects.

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    Piyamj  (28-06-2014)

  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    a bay tree (this is something that loves growing in a pot!), .
    Ooh I don't have a bay tree. How big do they grow @Cat74 ?

    We've got a half acre block and we're making every plant in the backyard edible, even the decorative ones. It's a work in progress and a big area to fill so we're always trying to think of new plants we don't have!

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    Quote Originally Posted by HillDweller View Post
    Ooh I don't have a bay tree. How big do they grow @Cat74 ?

    We've got a half acre block and we're making every plant in the backyard edible, even the decorative ones. It's a work in progress and a big area to fill so we're always trying to think of new plants we don't have!
    In the ground, I think they can get quite 10+ metres! They are part of the laurel family and I know that some of the decorative laurels turn into massive trees 20-30m but they really spread out rather than being straight up and down. So you have to be prepare for a tree that is going to be as wide or wider than it is tall.

    I thought bay trees were meant to be very slow growing but the one we have in a 45cm diameter pot has at least doubled in size every year. We bought it in a tiny pot from Bunnings - it was around 15-20cm in height and in three years it's about 80-90cm tall and 40cm at it's bushiest point. I've gotten it into a more bushy shape by trimming it back by one-third every August and then in September all the new growth goes crazy and it branches out. We also seem to get a secondary round of new growth in late April/early May, although this is only a few branches, whereas in September it is every limb that I have cut. I think it's because I replenish the soil twice a year to give all the plants a kick along.

    If it were my garden I'd buy a really large pot to contain the root system and curb long-term growth, plant the bay tree in the middle and have companion herbs/flowers around the base. We've had nasturtiums around ours but these died off back in April and I haven't replanted anything during the winter but will do something again over summer. That seemed to work really well. The bay tree didn't mind how large the nasturtiums got and they looked awesome cascading over the pot. Also very pretty in salads, both the young leaves and the flowers.

    Have you got any citrus trees? That would be my thing if I had the space to work with. I would love a Tahitian lime, lemon, orange and blood orange. I haven't had much success with those in pots unfortunately so I'll just have to wait until we move to a house.

    I'd also have a few rose bushes to attract the good insects, for the delightful smell and you can eat the petals too. I love the idea of all those edible flowers. It's not something I know enough about but certainly if I had the space I'd be right into it.

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    HillDweller  (28-06-2014)

  8. #15
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    Cat74's inner city balcony oasis and HillDweller's edible garden sound ah-mazing! So inspired. You must make lovely fresh meals with some of your home produce. Awesome!

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  10. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    In the ground, I think they can get quite 10+ metres! They are part of the laurel family and I know that some of the decorative laurels turn into massive trees 20-30m but they really spread out rather than being straight up and down. So you have to be prepare for a tree that is going to be as wide or wider than it is tall.

    I thought bay trees were meant to be very slow growing but the one we have in a 45cm diameter pot has at least doubled in size every year. We bought it in a tiny pot from Bunnings - it was around 15-20cm in height and in three years it's about 80-90cm tall and 40cm at it's bushiest point. I've gotten it into a more bushy shape by trimming it back by one-third every August and then in September all the new growth goes crazy and it branches out. We also seem to get a secondary round of new growth in late April/early May, although this is only a few branches, whereas in September it is every limb that I have cut. I think it's because I replenish the soil twice a year to give all the plants a kick along.

    If it were my garden I'd buy a really large pot to contain the root system and curb long-term growth, plant the bay tree in the middle and have companion herbs/flowers around the base. We've had nasturtiums around ours but these died off back in April and I haven't replanted anything during the winter but will do something again over summer. That seemed to work really well. The bay tree didn't mind how large the nasturtiums got and they looked awesome cascading over the pot. Also very pretty in salads, both the young leaves and the flowers.

    Have you got any citrus trees? That would be my thing if I had the space to work with. I would love a Tahitian lime, lemon, orange and blood orange. I haven't had much success with those in pots unfortunately so I'll just have to wait until we move to a house.

    I'd also have a few rose bushes to attract the good insects, for the delightful smell and you can eat the petals too. I love the idea of all those edible flowers. It's not something I know enough about but certainly if I had the space I'd be right into it.
    Oh fantastic, thanks for this! I've just announced to DH that we'll be adding edible flowers to our garden now too!

    We have a few fruit trees - lemon, apricot, peach. We were trying to decide between a line or blood orange tree, not sure yet which one we would use the most. We've just bought 2 pomegranate trees to plant too - looking forward to them growing

    We have 2 climbing roses over an archway (I like using the petals on top of cream on cakes - to make sure I keep the 'all edible' garden theme going ) and the chickens appreciate getting them as snacks too

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    Cat74  (28-06-2014)

  12. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piyamj View Post
    Cat74's inner city balcony oasis and HillDweller's edible garden sound ah-mazing! So inspired. You must make lovely fresh meals with some of your home produce. Awesome!
    It's great fun and I love being able to eat stuff we grow. You'll find even the herbs you grow will taste so much better than the ones in the shops you'll become a herb snob in no time hehe

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    @HillDweller, you have chickens? Now I'm really jealous! I would love to have chickens one day, feed on our own grown veggie scraps of course. Nothing tastes as good "homemade" eggs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    @HillDweller, you have chickens? Now I'm really jealous! I would love to have chickens one day, feed on our own grown veggie scraps of course. Nothing tastes as good "homemade" eggs.
    We have 7 chickens they are awesome! We have different breeds that lay different coloured eggs too. We are most definitely egg snobs now, the eggs from your own chickens taste so good I love how no food scraps really go to waste at our house - between the dogs, cat and chickens food scraps are covered!

    Here's some of our coloured eggs I love the blue eggs
    Attached Images

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    Cat74  (28-06-2014),Jontu  (28-06-2014)


 

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