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    Default Would you let your 4 year old die their hair?

    http://www.*******.com.au/why-i-let-...-dye-her-hair/

    There is no way I would let any of my girls colour their hair, let alone a 4 year old.

    Surely there are better ways to express yourself and become an individual at the age of 4?

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    @thepouts

    The link doesn't work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Degrassi View Post
    @thepouts

    The link doesn't work.
    No, you can't link to that website I'm sorry.

    But to answer the OP, it's a no from me, not at four, probably not at 14 either
    Her school has a fairly strict hair policy anyway.

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    sorry, I will copy and paste

    Recently my four year old asked me (again!) if she could have pink hair and instead of saying, “One day,” I said, “OK Honey, let’s do it!”

    Before you judge me, as you may (it’s the human condition to be judgemental, it’s how we figure out things that we don’t feel right about or understand, isn’t it?), know that I discussed the process with her. That it would involve proper hair dye with chemicals and we’d have to test a patch of her hair first. I told her that she’d have to wait and be patient while it set, and that it would wash out soon (it’s a six-wash rinse). Most importantly, I told her that we wouldn’t be doing it all the time, but this would be a special treat.
    A colourful life

    We’d used coloured hair spray a number of times for kinder fetes and birthday parties, and we’d also bought some expensive hair chalks from a salon, so she was familiar with the experience of having different coloured hair. I also knew she was unlikely to have an adverse skin reaction, as she hadn’t with any other hair products. Plus, I checked with a hairdresser friend to see if she knew of any reason why we shouldn’t dye her hair but she couldn’t think of any good reason, though warned that repeated applications could lead to dermatitis.
    With all of this sorted, we went to the pharmacy and she picked her colour – then home we went to shower and get her hair prepped. She was very good about keeping still while I applied the colour, which was a simple pre-mix paste so I just had to put on the gloves provided and evenly distribute. Then I used a warm cloth to tidy up her forehead and neck, and wrapped her head in cling film and made her a snack to eat while she watched TV and waited half an hour.
    Then another shower to shampoo and rinse, a blow dry and she was Strawberry Shortcake!
    How others reacted

    Her father arrived home to find her bouncing up and down. “Daddy! Daddy! Look at me! I have pink hair!” and after a fleeting look of surprise he gave her a cuddle, called her “Pinkie” and that was that.
    Out and about, she has been receiving many compliments and most passers-by smile when they see her pink curls bobbing in the autumn sunshine. Friends at preschool think it’s “cool”, and her teacher asked where she’d had it done.
    But despite the attention she’s been receiving, she’s really neither here nor there about it – it’s just pink hair, don’t care! Let’s get on with being four shall we?
    [IMG]http://cdn.*******.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/PINKY1-660x495.jpg[/IMG]It’s just another way of being creative

    We express our creativity in many different ways here at home, but this one was out of the ordinary for us. I’m happy I agreed to it though.
    Once I asked a mother who has a really great relationship with her teenage daughter how she did it. And she said, quite simply, that you just have to not freak out about things.
    Things are going to happen. My daughter will do things, things that will really challenge me, but I have already decided that I’ll practise the no-freaking out approach. And if I’m not able to be open to her individuality at four years of age, how can I expect to suddenly change my approach when she’s 16?
    I want to honour that now, establish it now, get it up and running so that I can foster a mother-and-daughter relationship that is open, frank, truthful, brave, strong and filled with many, many colourful experiences.
    And if I’m honest (which I always am), I love her hot pink hair!

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    I just think that by the mum agreeing to her 4 year olds request to dye her hair, she is saying "yes I agree your natural colour is boring, let's improve that" - not an intentional message but I feel that's what it says. If it was my 4 year old, I would want to know why she wanted to dye her hair. Why is a 4 year old even asking for this? It's confusing to me I didn't even consider asking my mum about hair dye until I was 13. I would be encouraging my 4 year old to express her creativity in different more age appropriate ways.

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    Yeah nah, Not at 4! I get asked all the time if i colour DS's hair and i just stare with a really blank 'really?' look on my face.

    I would consider it at 12-14 though (as that is when I started colouring my hair)

    I was in the salon one day when a mum came in with her 6-ish year old DD. While the mother got her regrowth done, her DD got a pink strip re-done in her hair. I didnt think that was too bad.

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    I get the idea of not being shocked when they do something you see as a bit wild as they're growing up and discovering their individuality. But this just looks like giving in to a 4 year old's every wish.

    My 6yo would love purple hair. I don't think. given that a child has less 'dead' outer skin layers than an adult, those products would be safe enough. Plus she has platinum blonde hair so even a rinse would stain it permanently. There's plenty of other fun things she can do to outwardly express herself, I'm nor going to dye her hair just because she asks. Children also need to learn that you don't always get everything you want.

    When she has a job and can buy the dye herself - go for it! I did.

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    In this case I think it's ok, the kid knew what was involved and it was a 6 wash rinse, not permanent dye. It sounds like they had fun and at the end of the day that's what counts

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    I don't colour my hair so I don't think my 6 year old even knows it's possible haha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GingerKat View Post
    I just think that by the mum agreeing to her 4 year olds request to dye her hair, she is saying "yes I agree your natural colour is boring, let's improve that" - not an intentional message but I feel that's what it says. If it was my 4 year old, I would want to know why she wanted to dye her hair. Why is a 4 year old even asking for this? It's confusing to me I didn't even consider asking my mum about hair dye until I was 13. I would be encouraging my 4 year old to express her creativity in different more age appropriate ways.
    Yes, I think that's an issue too. Making a fuss about all the compliments she gets when they're out - great way to teach your child that what others think is important, especially when it comes to how you look.

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