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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybump View Post
    Those saying it's a liability issue...um, no. There are no official oh&s or restaurant guidelines that state pregnant women should be precluded from specific foods. So it's really not his place, or "customer service" to educate me, I just find it so patronising.

    Like I said, the chef wasn't advising me of a potentially risky ingredient not apparent on the menu - he was questioning my choice.

    Not a big thing, but just another example of other people feeling like they have a right to comment on a woman's choices just because she's pregnant whereas nobody would ever think to do so in any other situation.
    ^^^^This^^^
    If it is an food safety/ handling issue, then how is the industry meant to deal with women who are 2 or 3 months pregnant and not showing.

    I would prefer the presumption is that pregnant women can source the guidelines for them selves, and chose to what degree they follow them.

    A ingredient included in a dish that may be considered a risk, ie: raw egg, should be clearly stated on the menu I think, as, once again how do you decide who may be pregnant. (and how many patrons do you possibly offend in the process).

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  3. #42
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    MilkingMaid is offline Winner 2009 - Mod Award - most supportive member
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    I think in an instance like this, probably the INTENT of the person is the most important thing. Obviously the intent was a good, caring and helpful one, and really that is what is important isn't it?

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by MilkingMaid View Post
    I think in an instance like this, probably the INTENT of the person is the most important thing. Obviously the intent was a good, caring and helpful one, and really that is what is important isn't it?
    Apparently not.

    -_-

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Nette View Post
    The pasteurisation process has no impact on listeria. It is your choice on what you eat, but I'm not convinced that your OB's advice is completely sound.
    Actually, pasteurisation does kill listeria. Full pasteurisation kills ALL bacteria in milk - even the good ones! Some products can be contaminated AFTER the pasteurization process if the listeria bacteria is living on machines used for packaging the product etc, but the bacteria is killed at the pasteurization or cooking stage.

    PS: that's 'my friend has a phd and specialises in bacteria and viruses' information
    Last edited by HillDweller; 08-06-2014 at 16:32.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Nette View Post
    The pasteurisation process has no impact on listeria. It is your choice on what you eat, but I'm not convinced that your OB's advice is completely sound.
    Both my GP and the dietician I saw a couple of times for GD agreed with my OB's approach so I'm confident. If I had any doubts in the professional advice I've received so far I wouldn't do it.

    So many decisions to be made as a mum or mum-to-be, we each need to choose what works for us as individuals.

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  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillDweller View Post
    Actually, pasteurisation does kill listeria. Full pasteurisation kills ALL bacteria in milk - even the good ones! Some products can be contaminated AFTER the pasteurization process if the listeria bacteria is living on machines used for packaging the product etc, but the bacteria is killed at the pasteurization or cooking stage.

    PS: that's 'my friend has a phd and specialises in bacteria and viruses' information
    To clarify, all milk products sold in Australia are pasteurised. What I meant was that does not mean you cannot contract listeria from pasteurised products eg soft cheeses.

    Everyone does there own risk assessment of what they are comfortable eating. Providing people are doing this based on facts, I have no issue with the decisions that individuals make.

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    It wouldn't have sat well with me if a chef advised what I should or shouldn't eat. It's not his place. I would have told him to mind his own business.

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  12. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    Not sure how I would feel about this TBH. I have gestational diabetes so I feel like a lot has already been taken off the menu for me. If someone tried to take my steak cooked the way I like it away too, I'm not sure I'd react very well.

    My OB has said as long as I'm confident about freshness of the meat then if I want to have medium-rare steak I can knock myself out. So at home I have it medium-rare (and lamb as well) because we buy from a really good butcher, but I usually opt for medium when I eat out. Well done steak is like rubber - not worth eating IMO. If it came out like that I wouldn't hesitate to send it back and request what I'd ordered.

    I also eat soft cheeses occasionally too. I know that's supposed to be a big no-no as well. But cheeses in Australia are pasteurised. Again, OB said if it's something like packaged feta or goat's cheese, only eat it on the day I open the packet and it's fine. It's when it's been sitting, exposed to the air, that you risk listeria.

    Can't wait for this bubba to come out so I can eat whatever I want again! And wine, oh how I miss you...
    Your obstetrician's suggestions are not consistent with that from food safety authorities. It doesn't matter how fresh your meat it with respect to toxoplasma - the infectious agents are there in the muscle before the animal was even slaughtered (so you don't get fresher than that). The only thing that will kill the toxoplasma is heat. That said, there is probably more risk in not using good hygiene when handling and preparing raw meat at home (ie not washing hands after touching meat or sharing knives, chopping boards, cloths etc) than eating a medium steak. But the risk is still there.

    Listeria is a bit different, but again you can't assume that risky foods in sealed packaging are safe because the infectious agents can (and do) contaminate the food during manufacturing (after pasteurisation) so are present inside the packaging. Pasteurisation reduces the risk relative to raw milk products, but listeria outbreaks do still occur in pasteurised dairy products. Listeria can survive and grow in sealed packaging in the fridge and once there, you need to heat the food to kill the bugs.

    The FSANZ website has some good information sheets on recommendations for pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems. The recommendations are evidence-based, meaning there is science behind their recommendations. By all means eat what you like, but you should be aware that the risk exists. In some respects, a chef warning you about the meat not being cooked through is no different to warning you that the food contains peanuts, gluten or dairy. What you do with that information is up to you.
    Last edited by clbj; 08-06-2014 at 17:39.

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    That's why I'd recommend any pregnant woman to get tested for immunization to toxoplasmosis.
    If you are immune, that's one worry off the list and you can enjoy your medium rare steak

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Nette View Post
    To clarify, all milk products sold in Australia are pasteurised. What I meant was that does not mean you cannot contract listeria from pasteurised products eg soft cheeses.

    Everyone does there own risk assessment of what they are comfortable eating. Providing people are doing this based on facts, I have no issue with the decisions that individuals make.

    That's cool and I agree, everyone has to make their own risk assessment on what they think is safe. We make our own cheeses, have eggs from our own chickens etc so what I eat when pregnant at home will probably be a bit different to what I eat from cafés or shops.

    I just wanted to clarify when you said pasteurisation has "no impact" on listeria, that it does in fact kill it, but storage and handling afterwards can cause the product to become re-contaminated. Just incase anyone else was confused


 

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