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  1. #31
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    Depends on what they're doing. I understand staying at home if you're saving for a house deposit or studying. Other than that I wouldn't only start questioning it at about 25 if they were showing no plans at all of leaving. Not because I want them out, but just because I'd want them to experience some independence and develop life skills. I don't think it's black and white, though. DEFINITELY need to be contributing either financially and/or with helping around the house considerably once they are out of school though - do own laundry, pay board, other agreed duties.
    Last edited by Justwant2beamummy; 05-06-2014 at 19:34.

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  3. #32
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    Guess it's my upbringing. For my siblings and I, plus lots of the friends I have, we didn't move out until we got married so this could be 30 plus.
    I wouldn't expect my kids to move out before they got married but would probably draw the line if they were around 30 s and bludging at home.

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  5. #33
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    I was a boomerang kid- moved in and out of my parents place several times before I moved out for good when I got married at 32!
    I did a fair bit of study/ travel in my 20's, and my parents were always willing to have me at home so I could afford to study or save for travel.
    When I was 30 I moved back in when I needed surgery that meant I needed lots of help during recovery. I decided to go overseas after that and started saving, but just after I'd bought my plane ticket DH and I got together and I changed my plans. We moved in together when we got married.
    I won't be kicking my kids out ever, unless they're taking advantage of the situation. As an adult living with my parents, I did my fair share of the household duties and contributed financially.

  6. #34
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    I don't have a set age. I would never ask them to leave and much prefer them to stay until they are financially capable of living on their own.
    I moved out at 18 moved back home at 19 then lived on and off with my mum until I moved in with my now DH at 23.

    My mum had to move out of home away from my brother because he was still living at home at 29 with no plans on moving lol.
    My SIL has also always lived with her parents. Got married and had 3 children all whilst living with her parents. To me I think that's too long though!

  7. #35
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    I think it depends on your parents everyone is different .....
    My brother (24) still lived at home until recently but he is a fully qualified carpenter with his own business my parents are well off & had the means to support us and wanted to until we were ready to move out responsibly & not struggle so they preferred us at home .
    He moved out when he finished building his own house . & I only moved out 2 years ago because I moved 8 hours away to be with my partner .

  8. #36
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    I'd like mine all gone by 20. I'm 43, my youngest is 10 months old. I'd like a few years child free before they wheel me into a retirement home!!

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  10. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillDweller View Post
    I know someone who is still doing that with their 34 year old son. Most of the time he doesn't even work (by choice). He doesn't pay anything to his parents because he "doesn't have any money" but the world doesn't work like that. You couldn't just tell the bank you're not going to pay your mortgage anymore because you cant be bothered to work full time. Something he's never going to find out because his parents aren't going to tell him to grow up and get out into the world. His Mum thinks it's "too mean" to tell him to leave, I think he's the one who's being mean by taking advantage of them..
    Sounds like the parents are pretty happy to baby him!!
    I tend to put the fault on the parents, he probably didn't grow up to be this "adult" by pure chance.
    @kw123 same in France. We actually think of sending the kids back to France to go to uni. And hopefully we'll go live there too but not under the same roof

  11. #38
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    No specific age as long as ds has some aspirations and intentions of leaving home and being independent. After he finishes school I would like him to have a part time job to be able to contribute to the household bills.

  12. #39
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    If we're still living in wa our kids will move out earlier as we want them to go to uni in Melbourne. Hopefully we'll be back there, at least part of each year

  13. #40
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    No set age but once DS leaves high school he will contribute some $$ for rent utilities food etc. His personal items like toiletries and any junk or snack type foods he can buy himself to.
    I would be encouraging him to move out once he's got a stable income.
    Oh and he will be doing chores to get pocket money way before that so he will still be doing that as well eg dishes, cleaning house, cooking etc


 

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