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  1. #11
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    I will never kick them out. They can stay for as long as they want.

    I moved out at 22 when I built my own house. Living at home meant I could save and do that.

    Turns out I hated living in the suburbs and after 3 years I moved home to sacs up go build a house in the country (my parents live on 10 acres). I realised I wanted to buy their house so now I pay off this house interest free while sharing with them.

    We added an extension so we could have our own area. It's the perfect arrangement for us as they watch the girls when I'm on night shift.

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  3. #12
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    MilkingMaid is offline Winner 2009 - Mod Award - most supportive member
    Question those who don't question authority
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialPatrolGroup View Post
    You beat me to it.

    I don't think there is a set age. All young people mature at different rates. Some 18 year olds are very capable and some lack maturity. Also some young people are studying, are under employed, earning appalling apprenticeship wages and trying to set themselves up with the required tools for future employment.

    My mum died when I was 17 and there was no way I was going to move out and leave dad to rattle around in that big house on his own. And he liked having us at home. He was very supportive to getting me on my feet and then we paid out fair share at home. Dad got cancer when I was 23 and died when I was 24 and the time with him was really special. So I never left home, instead my parents up and died on me.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using The Bub Hub mobile app
    Wow. That's a bloody hard start!

  4. #13
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    No set age. I would prefer them to be in a steady job with a decent income.

    I would never kick my son out but I also wouldn't enable him to be a bludger like my MIL does to BIL & SIL.

  5. #14
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    I think it depends on the person too. I'm not a huge fan of 'kids' living at home past their early 20's, but there's different circumstances for everyone. I moved out at 18 (my parents started leaving the newspaper open at the 'houses for rent' section haha) but my brother lived at home until he was about 23 or 24.

    The times I do frown about it though are:
    • the now adult is living at home so they can "save money" whilst not contributing to household bills or paying board
    • the now adult is still living like a "child" and expecting their parents to cook all their meals, clean up after them, buy all their food, pay all the bills. I think if you're an adult living at home you need to act like an adult living with other adults (and at the same time, that means the parents need to treat that person as an adult too).
    • I personally (don's flame suit just incase ) think that parents who try and get their kids to live at home, not paying any contributions, to save enough money so they'll "get ahead in life" are doing their children a teeny bit of a disservice. Having that "living week to week, buying second hand furniture and not expecting a lovely 4x2 house near the beach the minute I move out of home" is rather helpful for later life and later money management in my opinion I know a few people who are 27, living at home, earning a very good wage, not contributing and think it's totally normal and acceptable for them to go out buying $400 dresses every couple of weeks, while their Mum pays all the bills. Hmm.
    I know it isn't the absolute rule, but I see vast differences in maturity and the level of "reliance" on their parents between my DH and his brother. My DH moved out of home (and 500kms away) when he was 17. His brother moved out when he was 26. I also see that, although his brother is a year older than my DH, his parents treat my DH much more as an adult and trust that he'll make his own decisions. Their personalities are also different, so the age they moved out of home probably doesn't account for 100% of this, but I think it is a contributing factor.

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  7. #15
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    Early 20's, once earning enough to support themselves.

    Wouldn't be encouraging any time-wasting with university degrees. Either pick a degree, study it and complete it or if you're not enjoying the degree or unsure about it then take a break from it all together and work for a bit.

    I have too many friend's who are in their 6th year of 3 year degrees because they can't make their bloody mind up about what they want to do and consequently have never worked a day in their lives and live off youth allowance and whatever their parents give them.

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  9. #16
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    I would encourage my kids to move out by 25, but not enforce. I think for their own self worth they need to go out on their own, but if it absolutely wasn't possibly financially or they were studying then as long as they were respectful of my house rules then they could stay as long as they needed. I moved out when I was 21 and finished my degree and got my first full time job. My bro is still living at home at 27, and he is a 27 year old baby. Mum and Dad are desperate to get him out, but he only works casual shifts in a pub and would never be able to afford to live out of home. Mum feels like kicking him out would just be too cruel, so she lets him stay. She makes home to cushy for him though (does his washing, cooks and cleans for him, he contributes no money for bills, she loans him money, etc) so why would he leave?
    Last edited by GingerKat; 05-06-2014 at 18:49.

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  11. #17
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    I'm not sure there is a specific age as such? I left at 17, but I was working full time where my youngest sister left at 24 when she finished uni. Mum and dad had a rule where we could live with them as long as we liked but if we were working we paid our way.

    My uncle is 50 and still lives at home with his mum (my nana) cooking his dinner, cleaning the house and doing his washing!! Now that's too far!!

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  13. #18
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    I think as long as it's convenient and practicable then it's fine for them to keep living at home into their 20's.

    As long as they are earning an income though, they should contribute to the household, and also contribute in household chores and cooking meals etc.

    i know too many people well into their 20's who don't contribute a cent, have meals put in front of them every night and don't do any housework. This is overindulgence by parents and is not helping the 'kids' at all.

  14. #19
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    No set age, but once they are able to support themselves and have a small nest egg saved then I would expect they would want to leave. If they want to do a long uni degree then I would be happy to have them home well into their 20's, if that's what they also wanted.

    I think more important than what age they leave at is what they contribute to the household while they are still at home. I.e. working full time but still at home = paying decent board and helping out with some chores.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GingerKat View Post
    My bro is still living at home at 27, and he is a 27 year old baby. Mum and Dad are desperate to get him out, but he only works casual shifts in a pub and would never be able to afford to live out of home. Mum feels like kicking him out would just be too cruel, so she lets him stay. She makes home to cushy for him though (does his washing, cooks and cleans for him, loans him money, etc) so why would he leave?
    I know someone who is still doing that with their 34 year old son. Most of the time he doesn't even work (by choice). He doesn't pay anything to his parents because he "doesn't have any money" but the world doesn't work like that. You couldn't just tell the bank you're not going to pay your mortgage anymore because you cant be bothered to work full time. Something he's never going to find out because his parents aren't going to tell him to grow up and get out into the world. His Mum thinks it's "too mean" to tell him to leave, I think he's the one who's being mean by taking advantage of them..


 

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