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  1. #11
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    Another vote for reading eggs - as a parent and a teacher.

    Knowing high frequency words by sight, especially those that don't follow phonic rules, is a valuable reading skill but shouldn't be used in isolation. The practice work being sent home is typically not a representation of the entire in-class literacy program. More it is just selected tasks that are easy for parents to get involved in too.

    A favorite activity of mine is to hunt for the list words. Eg. In a magazine or newspaper, on signs at the shops. Also, write the words with water on concrete and watch them fade. Make groups of pebbles with the same number of sounds as the word (reading eggs will give you ideas too). Lots of things you can do beyond drills.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Raising Leprechauns  (04-06-2014)

  3. #12
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    Some great replies here- thanks so much everyone ❤️


    DH (34) Me (30)
    DS1 (8) * DS2 (4)
    ❤️ My Family ❤️

    Egg donor 2012

  4. #13
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    I hate them for the competitiveness it places on children. 'I'm on blue, well I'm on gold'. However, I photocopy them, cut them up and use them in the car for my ds to flick through. I still loathe them!

  5. #14
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    I'm having major dramas teaching my 5yo ds his. He has about 4-5 out of the first 12 but the other kids are up to 24!

    I'm so worried for my poor boy because the class is moving forward and he is t ready for it.

    This is why we wanted to keep him back to do prep next year but our school (qld public) wouldn't allow it 😟

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    Reading eggs is great.

    Also have a look at letterland. It gives all the letters characters and then by stories, explains why the letters make the sounds they make...lots of fun and gives them another method to remember things by....

    for example...

    H = Harry hat man
    s = sammy snake

    harry likes things quiet and doesn't like the SSSS sound that sammy makes...so when ever they are in a word together harry tells sammy to shhhh.

    there are books and cd's and also a computer program. Songs and games make up most of it and it is catchy and fun.

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    mrswhitehouse  (31-05-2014)

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrswhitehouse View Post
    I'm having major dramas teaching my 5yo ds his. He has about 4-5 out of the first 12 but the other kids are up to 24!

    I'm so worried for my poor boy because the class is moving forward and he is t ready for it.

    This is why we wanted to keep him back to do prep next year but our school (qld public) wouldn't allow it 😟
    How do you go about practising them? I am a teacher and mother and I know for some kids, just repeatedly reading them through doesn't work. Are you saying he is given 12 words in each list? I would reduce the number of words he is focusing on at a time to, say, 3-5 words. Make them into flash cards and play games with them. For example, play 'memory' (also known as matching pairs). 'tic tac toe' is also a good one, where students have to chant, "Tic tac toe, here I go, where I stop, no-one knows", pointing at a card with each word said. The one they land on they have a go at reading. It can also be really useful to kids to have the words already cut out according to the shape of the whole word (cutting around tall and short letters to give different levels depending on the height of the letter). This gives a really good visual prompt for children and can help them recognise the shape of the word when presented with it in a sentence or other context. For words which follow regular spelling sounds, make a second set of flashcards into a puzzle, practising putting the sounds together to make the word.

    The best way would be to find out how your child learns best. Is he a visual learner? A sensory learner? An analytical learner? Visual learning is to do with the look of the word (eg see suggestions above) and the 'whole word' shape etc.

    Sensory learning ideas could include: practise writing his words in sand or dirt, no-mess finger painting of the words (two sheets of plastic sealed together around the edges, but with a small amount of paint inside, for writing by running your finger along it), make the words out of smarties or sultanas or something small, make the words out of playdough, use magnets to make the words, make the words with popsticks, make the words with pipecleaners, adult to make the words with felt and get the student to trace the words with a finger while reading them.

    Analytical learning refers to how the words are organised or put together. This is where the words can be broken into sounds as mentioned above, or find words that look similar and identify their differences. Some activities for an analytical learner could be 'pyramid words' (on the first line write the first letter, underneath write the first two letters, under that write the first 3 letters etc until the word makes a pyramid shape), cutting the words into individual letters or sounds, colour coding the words, sorting the words (child can decide how to sort them into groups as this will aid their memory best), reading a book with the aim to find specific focus words, etc.

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    Gothel  (31-05-2014)

  10. #17
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    @mrswhitehouse with the felt letters, you could just have a set of felt letters ready-made, and then make the words for him from those for him to trace with his finger. They could then be re-used and made into other words when the list changes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by River Song View Post
    Reading eggs is great.

    Also have a look at letterland. It gives all the letters characters and then by stories, explains why the letters make the sounds they make...lots of fun and gives them another method to remember things by....

    for example...

    H = Harry hat man
    s = sammy snake

    harry likes things quiet and doesn't like the SSSS sound that sammy makes...so when ever they are in a word together harry tells sammy to shhhh.

    there are books and cd's and also a computer program. Songs and games make up most of it and it is catchy and fun.
    be careful using letter land though, as studies have been done that have shown it to teach students the character names and then for them to have difficulty associating the sounds and assimilating their knowledge into words because they are spending too much thought on the characters and stories and not enough on the letters and sounds themselves. The basic rule of thumb is 'think smarter, not harder'. In other words, it is better to use a method that takes only a small amount of 'brain space' rather than taking up all the brain space with unnecessary thought paths. If it seems complicated, it probably is and there is likely to be an easier way to solve the problem. The less cluttered the brain is, the more space there is to develop thought further and become even more advanced in the skill being learnt.

  12. #19
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    and all that the Lorax left here in this mess was a small pile of rocks with the one word...UNLESS
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    I'm currently gathering information to back up the fact that I think my children's school has missed something.

    My daughter (year 2) used to have a spelling list weekly and it had theme (eg. ck, i-e...) but suddenly they switched to saying that there is research to show that homework is not needed, and the homework is now spellodrome and mathletics.

    I am not happy with this and am gathering information as my daughter has said that she now does Dolch words (which are sight words). I do not like inconsistency and to change phonetic spelling to sight words does not compute (to me)

    To put my "therapist hat on" I know some children do not cope with sight words.

    I clearly recall a 10 year old coming to a therapy session where we made cornflake cookies as an activity. Everytime he saw a long word (cornflake or chocolate) beginning with c he saw cauliflower rather than the logical word of cornflakes or chocolates.

    That example showed me blatently that sight words do not work with children with difficulties.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jussi View Post
    How do you go about practising them? I am a teacher and mother and I know for some kids, just repeatedly reading them through doesn't work. Are you saying he is given 12 words in each list? I would reduce the number of words he is focusing on at a time to, say, 3-5 words. Make them into flash cards and play games with them. For example, play 'memory' (also known as matching pairs). 'tic tac toe' is also a good one, where students have to chant, "Tic tac toe, here I go, where I stop, no-one knows", pointing at a card with each word said. The one they land on they have a go at reading. It can also be really useful to kids to have the words already cut out according to the shape of the whole word (cutting around tall and short letters to give different levels depending on the height of the letter). This gives a really good visual prompt for children and can help them recognise the shape of the word when presented with it in a sentence or other context. For words which follow regular spelling sounds, make a second set of flashcards into a puzzle, practising putting the sounds together to make the word.

    The best way would be to find out how your child learns best. Is he a visual learner? A sensory learner? An analytical learner? Visual learning is to do with the look of the word (eg see suggestions above) and the 'whole word' shape etc.

    Sensory learning ideas could include: practise writing his words in sand or dirt, no-mess finger painting of the words (two sheets of plastic sealed together around the edges, but with a small amount of paint inside, for writing by running your finger along it), make the words out of smarties or sultanas or something small, make the words out of playdough, use magnets to make the words, make the words with popsticks, make the words with pipecleaners, adult to make the words with felt and get the student to trace the words with a finger while reading them.

    Analytical learning refers to how the words are organised or put together. This is where the words can be broken into sounds as mentioned above, or find words that look similar and identify their differences. Some activities for an analytical learner could be 'pyramid words' (on the first line write the first letter, underneath write the first two letters, under that write the first 3 letters etc until the word makes a pyramid shape), cutting the words into individual letters or sounds, colour coding the words, sorting the words (child can decide how to sort them into groups as this will aid their memory best), reading a book with the aim to find specific focus words, etc.
    Thank you SO much. Those are some great ideas and I will give some a try over this weekend. I like the idea of working on 3-5 at a time and will try that too.

    I think he is a sensory learner.

    So far I've tried sticking labels with the words on to his lego which he LOVES (the lego not the words lol) I've made a car park on paper and put a word in each park and played a game where he parked his matchbox cars in them and we read the words or I asked him to park in 'at' etc.

    I've made flash cars with a glitter glue pen so he can feel the words, I've made normal flash cards that I put sprinkles of gold glitter on and laminated (they are gold words)

    He goes to a tutor every Saturday morning and she has been working with him since December as we knew he was not ready for prep.

    He is still working on being able to read the numbers 6,7,8,9,10 too. He can count to them but doesn't recognise the number symbol when you show it to him.

    I'm now just trying to do things with him a couple if times a day which is a little sad for me as I see other kids in his class get it with not much help and I wish my poor boy didn't have to go over it sooooo many times (which he finds boring) when he could be playing.

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    jussi  (31-05-2014)


 

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