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    Default What tests are these & insulin/carbs...

    I went to my dr today and got a request for further tests to officially diagnose PCOS...

    The test form says....

    Free testesteron, DEHA, androgen study, LH, FSH, fasting insuline, fasting BSL.

    Can anyone explain what these are for?

    My dr said to fast before having them done and also said dont eat carbs for dinner the night before so no pasta or potato to get accurate insulin reading.. why would that be?? how does that impact insulin study?
    Thanks.

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    Fasting BSL ( blood sugar level) is the diabetes test - they always recommend you fast so they can measure your levels on the average - otherwise everyone's levels differ after they have eaten so it's harder to get an average

    Potatos /pasta and any other carbs will spike your insulin level and in theory "prepare" your body for any other sugar hit so in the morning when you test and drink that sweet liquid they say they can't get an accurate reading to test against an average if your body is prepared for it

    FSH and DEHA I think from memory is estrogen or hormone level test which would be required to check levels for pcos

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    Thanks

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    The androgen study is done to check hormones for pocs as well.

    BSL's are checked as insulin resistance is common with pocs.


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    Not just no pasta and potatoes. Also no bread, rice, legumes, fruit, etc.

    I'm surprised that's what they told you to avoid the night before. When I had my diabetes test I was told by S&N that I should have a certain amount of carbs for two days prior to testing. Might be worth checking with test provider first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    Not just no pasta and potatoes. Also no bread, rice, legumes, fruit, etc.

    I'm surprised that's what they told you to avoid the night before. When I had my diabetes test I was told by S&N that I should have a certain amount of carbs for two days prior to testing. Might be worth checking with test provider first.
    I think it would depend on the particular test in question. I've had several where I've just had to fast from the night before and one where I had to gorge on carbs for a day or 2 beforehand, then go and drink the horrible sugary drink, have a blood test, wait an hour, have another blood test, wait another hour, have another blood test. They usually only do this one of there is an indication that you may have insulin resistance/diabetes which would be picked up by elevated bsl's done in the first test I described.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HarvestMoon View Post
    I think it would depend on the particular test in question. I've had several where I've just had to fast from the night before and one where I had to gorge on carbs for a day or 2 beforehand, then go and drink the horrible sugary drink, have a blood test, wait an hour, have another blood test, wait another hour, have another blood test. They usually only do this one of there is an indication that you may have insulin resistance/diabetes which would be picked up by elevated bsl's done in the first test I described.

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    That's exactly why I think the OP should check with the pathology place beforehand to make sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    That's exactly why I think the OP should check with the pathology place beforehand to make sure.
    Third for this - sometimes the GP's aren't actually aware of the correct prep! When I worked in medical (specialists, radiology, pathology) we would also often have patients just stroll in without appts for things because their GP would tell them they didn't need an appt or any prep. People would get really cranky and insist with us that's what their doctor told them. It's hard to tell someone that their doctor was wrong about something when they are convinced the doctor they trust so much is infallible and knows everything :/

    ETA - also, (and I knew this isn't the OP's fault here, a lot of GPs are bad for this these days) never leave a doctors office with a referral form in hand if you don't understand everything written on it. Ask them to explain any abbreviations and all chicken scratch handwriting or clinical notes. The pathologist, specialist, radiographer, sonographer etc will often ask you "so, why are you here today?" Hearing a patient say "I don't know" or "the doctor told me to come" is really unhelpful for diagnostic or even appt booking purposes. It's really important to understand and take control of your own health, and you have a right to know (an d never feel embarrassed for asking!)
    Last edited by Tattereds; 27-05-2014 at 18:31.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat74 View Post
    That's exactly why I think the OP should check with the pathology place beforehand to make sure.
    Well I think judging by the the doctors instructions and tests required, it's a simple case of checking BSL's. It doesn't sound like there is anything extra that needs to be checked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tattereds View Post
    Third for this - sometimes the GP's aren't actually aware of the correct prep! When I worked in medical (specialists, radiology, pathology) we would also often have patients just stroll in without appts for things because their GP would tell them they didn't need an appt or any prep. People would get really cranky and insist with us that's what their doctor told them. It's hard to tell someone that their doctor was wrong about something when they are convinced the doctor they trust so much is infallible and knows everything :/

    ETA - also, (and I knew this isn't the OP's fault here, a lot of GPs are bad for this these days) never leave a doctors office with a referral form in hand if you don't understand everything written on it. Ask them to explain any abbreviations and all chicken scratch handwriting or clinical notes. The pathologist, specialist, radiographer, sonographer etc will often ask you "so, why are you here today?" Hearing a patient say "I don't know" or "the doctor told me to come" is really unhelpful for diagnostic or even appt booking purposes. It's really important to understand and take control of your own health, and you have a right to know (an d never feel embarrassed for asking!)
    Thanks

    I completely understand that sometimes drs get it wrong, too. I believe it's something strange about them actually being human as well hahaha

    I generally ask a lot of questions, I did about my ultrasound and the referral to the obgyn and she just briefly summarized the bloods with "basic hormones and insulin" haha.

    Thanks everyone. I am having them on Thursday


 

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