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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    Wow I am so glad my son goes to a centre where all food is provided! What a nightmare. Confiscating food without providing an alternative is awful. How do they think they are frankly? They are not the parent.

    I do think many people need "help" with food choices for their kids particularly at school age as it does affect their behaviour and ability to learn. Healthy school lunches should be provided for this reason.

    I didn't go to school in Australia so is the norm here for kids to take their own lunch all the way up to high school?
    There are no free school dinners in Australia.

    ETA - there are no school dinners at all. Most schools operate a canteen.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 27-05-2014 at 09:01.

  2. #52
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    DS preschool has food rules but the way they `enforce' them is to get the kids to eat the healthy stuff first (I guess in the hope they will be full and not want the junk). So they have to eat their fruit first then yoghurt, sandwich etc.

    I really like the strict food rules, it stops (IMO) the food competition. DS used to be at FDC and one of the other girls there just had a lunch box of cr!p every day, packets of cheese balls, flavored milks etc and DS always used to come home and ask if he could have cheese balls etc in his lunch the next day. Much better if they all have a pretty standard box with fruit, yoghurt and sandwich.

    I think it is a bit rough to make a child go hungry if there are no alternatives in the lunchbox though.

  3. #53
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    All the hand wringing in this thread over some unflavoured corn chips and homemade carrot cookies with a few chocolate sprinkles Talk about trying to make the OP feel like a horrible mother, she hardly sent a chocolate bar! I think what you sent for the day was fine OP.

    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    I actually detest the fact that any institution can tell parents what to feed their children. It makes me really mad. If they're not providing nutritional food themselves, then IMO all they should be able to do is offer guidelines. I don't think it's anyone else's god damned business what I feed my kids.
    I think this stuff about restricting foods and shaming kids about what's in their lunch box is going to backfire catastrophically.
    I feel the same way. When DS was in pre school they sent home a bran muesli bar saying it was "junk". Ooookkk. Yet I would see kids eating biscuits with that processed cheese spread stuff out of the jar with not a word spoken. They are my children. Set healthy suggestions, I have no issue with that. But withholding food from my child bc of some rule with double standards? My kids eat healthy. Fruit every single day in their lunch box. Vegies every night for tea with lean meat. If I want my child to have a snack sized packet of plain Thins that's MY business. Yes I know my child is in their care, but I am still the guardian!

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  5. #54
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    It's my understanding that centres must follow these strict national guidelines with the food THEY provide ie. Morning/afternoon tea etc . But parents don't, they only need to follow the centre's policy. I can't see how it's possible a centre will loose funding because a child brought in a packet of chips.
    Did they offer other food to replace what they confiscated?
    I'd ask to see their policy and if it doesn't state anything about home cooked items or salt/ sugar intake in food, all they can do is 'encourage' you to bring other food, they can't actually confiscate it from your child.

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  7. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koarlo View Post
    Did they offer other food to replace what they confiscated?
    We only had food taken once, and I was so mortified I ensured it never happened again. But no, he wasn't given anything to replace it. I always tend to over pack, so he had fruit and cheese and other stuff, so he didn't go hungry, but if that was the only thing I provided for play lunch he would have gone hungry

  8. #56
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    This really annoys me. Try to do the right thing and it still comes back to bite you in the bum.

    Before DD started pre school, i asked them if there were any food restrictions etc. I wanted to make sure that there were no allergies or restrictions so DD did not feel uncomfortable or get "in trouble" for bringing the wrong food. I was told nope no restrictions etc by the teacher.

    Each day she gets a sandwich or wrap, 2 pieces of fruit, a museli bar and a treat - a piece of banana cake or a small packet of tiny teddies . She knows she has to eat the good stuff first and if she does then she can eat the treat.

    DD came home on the first day crying because she got in trouble for having 5 honey tiny teddies in her lunchbox. I hit the roof.

    I went and spoke to the teacher and i was told that because the children come to school without being fed breakfast most times that they have to be strict and make sure what they eat at school is nutritional.

    I basically told the teacher that DD gets breakfast EVERY MORNING (and most times a second one at child care !) and that if she has an issue with what is in the lunchbox then she is to address it with me and not to stop dd from eating anything i pack for her.

    DD has the attention span of a goldfish and is easily destracted so i find that a treat in her lunchbox ensures that she eats alot more of the healthy stuff i pack. She even leaves her peels or wrappers in the lunchbox so she can show me she ate it all!

    There is a fine line, i think, between teachers guiding and controlling. I know alot of people on here are saying its policy etc but i tend to think that SOMETIMES (and i stress only in certain circumstances) that the teacher takes things a bit too far.

    I think this is the case with my DD's teacher as she tries to do things to "trip the parent up" so to speak. Every monday is library day, the children go to the library and pick a book to bring home. DD brought the same book home last week that she did three weeks ago. I asked the teacher why and she said that she was testing the parents to see if they actually read the books to the kids at night. WTF?

    In my case the teacher is on a power trip and i have to stand my ground with her. I have also requested DD to have a different teacher next year.

    OP - stick with you instincts. You are the parent.

  9. #57
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    I read in a previous thread on this topic ages ago from a CC worker that these rules are brought in, not for those of us that feed our kids well and are happy to chuck in a packet of chips with their fruit and bickies. But those that don't feed their kids properly.

    But really? If a parent/s feed their kids rubbish until 4/5 years old, the chances are that enforcing strict rules 9-3 for a year at pre school is going to make little difference. They can't control the family's eating at home, nor after they go to primary. I just see unhealthy families packing some fruit and yoghurt for the year to shut staff up, while feeding them rubbish for tea, then reverting to the rubbish in primary. I really don't see it will make a lasting difference.

    It's all very draconian and Nanny state to me.

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  11. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly39 View Post
    I think the school must be trying to tell you something.

    Corn chips are not a very nutritious or appropriate food for a preschool aged child. They really are just junk.

    As for the biscuits, well, they will eventually cause tooth decay and aren't very nutritious either.... As Cookie Monster says, they are a 'sometimes' food.

    A better choice might be dried or fresh fruit, a banana, a ham sandwich, or some cheese and crackers.

    In the interests of your childs health, I'd consider watching Jamie Oliver's documentaries on childhood nutrition and serving suggestions, he's awesome.
    While corn chips may not be a great option health wise all the time, once in a while would be ok. I'm sure the op doesn't send her to school with such items daily. Unfortunately it's the mothers that do send junk in their kids lunch boxes daily that make it hard for everyone else. I'm very conscious of sugar in particular in my kids diets but I do give ds a little sugary snack in his lunch box a few times a week. And today I put a few pieces of licorice in his lunchbox, he needs a little salt in his diet just as he does fat and sugar. I've never been told I have put something not allowed in there, perhaps because the teacher has figured out it isn't a regular occurrence for me to do so but if I was to be pulled up on it I wouldn't be happy and would be telling the teacher so. I've seen some of the kids lunch boxes when I've been assisting ds's class and can see why there is such a fuss about it.

  12. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I read in a previous thread on this topic ages ago from a CC worker that these rules are brought in, not for those of us that feed our kids well and are happy to chuck in a packet of chips with their fruit and bickies. But those that don't feed their kids properly.

    But really? If a parent/s feed their kids rubbish until 4/5 years old, the chances are that enforcing strict rules 9-3 for a year at pre school is going to make little difference. They can't control the family's eating at home, nor after they go to primary. I just see unhealthy families packing some fruit and yoghurt for the year to shut staff up, while feeding them rubbish for tea, then reverting to the rubbish in primary. I really don't see it will make a lasting difference.

    It's all very draconian and Nanny state to me.
    I don't think there's any harm in trying. We have fruit break (crunch and sip) at my school and it encourages kids who normally wouldn't eat fruit or vege sticks to bring something healthy in and eat it. At least they're getting something nutritionally sound that they would never get otherwise.

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  14. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I don't think there's any harm in trying. We have fruit break (crunch and sip) at my school and it encourages kids who normally wouldn't eat fruit or vege sticks to bring something healthy in and eat it. At least they're getting something nutritionally sound that they would never get otherwise.
    Oh I agree, we do crunch and sip too, but it's the blanket rules in pre school that bother me. What happened to good old common sense. As a teacher, if I saw a lunch box containing a ham sandwich on grained bread, a banana, a tub of yoghurt... and a little packet of tiny teddies I would think that the majority was healthy. I remember a teacher saying on here they had a student that brought a cold cheese burger for lunch and chocolate bars to school every day. Clearly that IS unhealthy and something that needs to be broached.

    I have no issue with encouraging healthy food. It's the firm rules that bother me.

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