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  1. #1
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    Default Hyperlexia dx - what does this mean for his future??

    Hi there! 7yo DS has just been diagnosed with hyperlexia. We've been struggling with an appropriate diagnosis for my son for years.....diagnosed with severe language disorder at 3, ADHD and Sensory Processing Disorder at 5. Which explained some of the behaviours and struggles that he displayed, but not others. He's had numerous assessments, all which showed huge discrepancies in scores which didn't really make sense, autistic-like traits but not enough to classify as ASD, and the developmental paed struggled to really figure it all out.

    He was finally sent for a neuropsych evaluation, which revealed that he is hyperlexic, along with having difficulties with executive function and working memory (yet brilliant memory in general!).

    In a sense I feel relieved that there are finally answers!! Reading through the information, it truly is DS to a tee, it completes that missing piece of the puzzle.

    However, now I'm kind of fearful...what does this mean for his future? Will he always struggle? Due to it's link/similarity to ASD, is it a recognized disability that he will be able to get extra school funding for?? His teacher this year is absolutely brilliant and very insightful towards DS's struggles, she feels that year 3 (next year) will probably be quite hard for him as demand increases, and thinks that he would probably need a teachers aide.

    I have no idea about therapies/treatments at this stage, the neuropsych is in the process of organizing therapy with the clinical psych.

    I'm not quite sure the exact purpose of this post, lol. Guess I just need to get it out there, I would love to hear from others who have experience with this also, feeling a bit alone with it currently.

  2. #2
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    I have no advice, I hope somebody does. I have never heard of it before so I'm about to google to find out.

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    I have been reading up on hyperlexia recently and it appears some drs think it is familiar to autism and others don't. The reason I have read up on it is because ds who just turned 6 doesn't appear to put words together and his teacher mentioned hyperlexia. However, he was talking fluently at 2 years old, never had issues pronouncing any words, he is fantastic at maths, he can write and recognises letters and spells out and writes words and is definitely not autistic. When we work with him on putting words and sentences together at home he can do it although he also can get frustrated and give up easily if he doesn't know a word. He is having a lot of assessments with OT at the moment, all of which he scored above average. He has seen an optometrist and he has a weakness in his one eye but not anything to worry about at the moment, we are going to take him to ophthalmologist for further testing and the OT has mentioned perhaps he has a processing disorder and that's the next assessment. So we are not sure if there is an issue or whether it's laziness, perhaps more one on one would be beneficial.
    The teacher did say that if he did have hyperlexia it will just be a matter of teaching him a different way, she was quite confident he will get there.
    Last edited by Blessedwith3boys; 20-05-2014 at 20:15.

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    "Hyperlexia is characterised by an intense fascination with letters or numbers or, in younger people, a highly advanced ability to read far beyond their age level. People with hyperlexia, nevertheless, have difficulty understanding verbal language and interacting and socialising with others.

    Hyperlexia is considered to be part of the autism spectrum of disorders and like autistic children, children with hyperlexia have problems socializing and behaving appropriately. They also exhibit other characteristics of autism:
    Self-stimulatory behavior
    Ritualistic behavior
    Concrete and literally thinking
    Difficulty with abstract concepts
    Normal development until 18-24 months, followed by regression
    Need to keep routines
    Difficulty transitioning from one activity to another

    Additional characteristics of autism include the following:
    Sensitivity to sounds, smells, and touch
    Unusual fears
    Selective listening (may appear to be deaf)"

    http://www.ldail.com/index.php?optio...=12&Itemid=112

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    Some experts denote three explicit types of hyperlexics, specifically:
    Type 1: Neurotypical kids that are very early readers.
    Type 2: Kids on the autism spectrum, which demonstrate very early reading as a splinter skill.
    Type 3: Very early readers who are not on the autism spectrum though there are some “autistic-like” traits and behaviors which gradually fade as the youngster gets older.

    The severity, frequency, and grouping of the following symptoms will determine an actual diagnosis of hyperlexia:
    A precocious ability to read words far above what would be expected at a youngster’s age
    Abnormal and awkward social skills
    An intense need to keep routines, difficulty with transitions, ritualistic behavior
    Auditory, olfactory and / or tactile sensitivity
    Difficulty answering "Wh–" questions, such as "what," "where," "who," and "why"
    Difficulty in socializing and interacting appropriately with people
    Echolalia (repetition or echoing of a word or phrase just spoken by another person)
    Fixation with letters or numbers
    Listens selectively / appears to be deaf
    Memorization of sentence structures without understanding the meaning
    Normal development until 18-24 months, then regression
    Self-stimulatory behavior (hand flapping, rocking, jumping up and down)
    Significant difficulty in understanding verbal language
    Specific or unusual fears
    Strong auditory and visual memory
    Think in concrete and literal terms, difficulty with abstract concepts
    Youngster may appear gifted in some areas and extremely deficient in others

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to ~ElectricPink~ For This Useful Post:

    lilypily  (20-05-2014)

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    Thanks for the replies! Kimberleygal, has your son had a speech assessment done? I'd also recommend organizing an IQ test with the school counsellor, they will assess strengths and weaknesses which will greatly assist in figuring out if there is an issue and what it may be. With my sons IQ test, he was on 86th percentile for performance IQ, but only 7th percentile for verbal IQ! Such a discrepancy between scores is what eventually led to this diagnosis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~ElectricPink~ View Post
    Thanks for the replies! Kimberleygal, has your son had a speech assessment done? I'd also recommend organizing an IQ test with the school counsellor, they will assess strengths and weaknesses which will greatly assist in figuring out if there is an issue and what it may be. With my sons IQ test, he was on 86th percentile for performance IQ, but only 7th percentile for verbal IQ! Such a discrepancy between scores is what eventually led to this diagnosis.
    Yes he had a speech assessment and scored well above average. His hearing was tested too and all fine there. Might look into the IQ test, thanks! In reference to what I read and as above posters mentioned I'm not sure if he has this as he doesn't fit the criteria, only issue is putting words together.

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    Hmmm you could be describing my DS3. Will keep this in mind

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    I compiled some hyperlexia links over here: http://intellectualizing.net/2013/09...-bibliography/

    I think I've seen almost everything online - surprisingly few resources, really.


 

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