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  1. #11
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    This is a good fact sheet on fever in kids which I find reassuring http://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_...r_in_children/
    Hopefully your child will fight through whatever bug is causing trouble quickly.

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    I usually worry around the 39 and above mark IF nothing drops it, as in panadol and a tepid bath etc can't bring it down. But I always say you can never be too cautious if you are concerned you could give nurse on call a ring and ask what they think. Dd had a 40.1 temp last night but was able to drop it with nurophen so I didn't worry too much, she's 4 now though and we've had our fair share of fever

  3. #13
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    I started to worry when ds was over 39 because he had never had one over 38 before (his normal temp tends to be quite low) and he was distressed.

    But as I was told by a dr the temperature itself is not a concern (that is just their body fighting to get better) so unless the child is distressed there is no need to administer medication.

    The issue is however if they go on for several days without an explanation.

    Keep a log of temps and medication given because if it doesn't get better and you go to the dr then you have evidence to back you up.

    Recently ds (18 months) had temps that spiked really quickly from normal to 39.5 in the space of 10 minutes. The first dr I saw in our regular practice said it was just teething. On day 3 of around the clock spikes which medicine was not stopping they finally took me serious when I produced a log of the temps every half hr and ordered tests.

    In the end he simply had roseola so it was nothing to worry about (providing we could keep temps down so not to cause febrile convulsions).

  4. #14
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    I usually dose DD with panadol or neurofen once her temp rises much above 39 as she vomits whenever she gets a high temp. I get concerned if it doesn't come down with medication, is persistent for several days and if DD is really unwell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sajimum View Post
    I usually dose DD with panadol or neurofen once her temp rises much above 39 as she vomits whenever she gets a high temp. I get concerned if it doesn't come down with medication, is persistent for several days and if DD is really unwell.
    ETA I hope your night wasn't too bad and your little one is feeling better this morning

  6. #16
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    Heres how to conceptualise fevers in kids ....


    if the child has a temp but is active (running round, playing) AND there is an obvious focus for the temp to indicate a viral illness (a cough, runny nose, etc) then the child is fighting the infection well and you can continue to observe the child at home.


    if the child has a temp and LOOKS SICK (not interacting, just lying there, sleeping all the time, limp, floppy, won't settle, upset) AND/OR there is NO OBVIOUS FOCUS for the fever, then the child needs to be reviewed by a doctor and investigated.


    For example, the classic missed diagnosis we see are urinary tract infections (no obvious focus) where the child has a fever +/- vomiting and goes undetected for a period of time.


    General practice points -


    If the child looks unwell its always worth a trial of panadol to see if they bounce back.


    Prolonged fevers >39 usually spell trouble and need to be seen.


    A temp of 40 should be seen by a doctor.


    if the child has a headache and a fever think meningitis.


    If the child is <3months with a fever all bets are off as the immune system has not matured enough to fight infections, and this is one of the arguments for continuing to breast feed so the child has some degree of protection from you. Fevers in this age group should be reviewed quickly. It's also probably worthwhile mentioning that kids of this age can be quite ill and not spike a temp, and deteriorate rapidly, so get them looked at early.

    The other big reason to have a child looked at is if the mother is concerned. Mothers are usually right about their kids, even if it is just a gut feeling. If something just doesn't seem right, act.


    For the purposes of this post a 'temp' is 38c and over.



    Hope this is helpful ...
    Last edited by Butterfly39; 16-05-2014 at 08:34.

  7. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Butterfly39 For This Useful Post:

    giggle berry  (16-05-2014),May baby  (16-05-2014),MummyBic  (16-05-2014),Piyamj  (17-05-2014),Renn  (16-05-2014)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donnab739 View Post
    Recently ds (18 months) had temps that spiked really quickly from normal to 39.5 in the space of 10 minutes. The first dr I saw in our regular practice said it was just teething.
    That's pretty concerning to me, given that current evidence suggests no causal link between teething & temperatures. The anecdotal connection seems to be because ages 6-24 months are when teething generally occurs, and also when kids have the highest rates of viral infections.

    As for temperature... I only take DDs temperature if she's distressed or a long way from her normal self. My approach is roughly 38-39 - dress her lightly and keep an eye on it. 39-40 strip her down, give her panadol, watch her closely. Thankfully that's all we've had to deal with so far.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly39 View Post
    Heres how to conceptualise fevers in kids ....


    if the child has a temp but is active (running round, playing) AND there is an obvious focus for the temp to indicate a viral illness (a cough, runny nose, etc) then the child is fighting the infection well and you can continue to observe the child at home.


    if the child has a temp and LOOKS SICK (not interacting, just lying there, sleeping all the time, limp, floppy, won't settle, upset) AND/OR there is NO OBVIOUS FOCUS for the fever, then the child needs to be reviewed by a doctor and investigated.


    For example, the classic missed diagnosis we see are urinary tract infections (no obvious focus) where the child has a fever +/- vomiting and goes undetected for a period of time.


    General practice points -


    If the child looks unwell its always worth a trial of panadol to see if they bounce back.


    Prolonged fevers >39 usually spell trouble and need to be seen.


    A temp of 40 should be seen by a doctor.


    if the child has a headache and a fever think meningitis.


    If the child is <3months with a fever all bets are off as the immune system has not matured enough to fight infections, and this is one of the arguments for continuing to breast feed so the child has some degree of protection from you. Fevers in this age group should be reviewed quickly. It's also probably worthwhile mentioning that kids of this age can be quite ill and not spike a temp, and deteriorate rapidly, so get them looked at early.

    The other big reason to have a child looked at is if the mother is concerned. Mothers are usually right about their kids, even if it is just a gut feeling. If something just doesn't seem right, act.


    For the purposes of this post a 'temp' is 38c and over.



    Hope this is helpful ...

    Totally agree with this quote, my 8 month old DD had consistently high temps above 38.5 for three weeks, she was miserable.
    After multiple GP visits ruling out ears, throat, chest they put it down to teething.
    ok I thought maybe she's a REALLY bad teether, but then one night she had afebrile convulsion and started turning blue, we called the ambulance and went into ED, again they said teething and sent us home after a few hours.

    Two nights later she had another febrile convulsion, back to hospital again, the paramedics and doctors said 'oh she's probably just teething' by this stage it had been almost a month and she was beside herself (as was I). I was convinced she was really sick but no one would listen, again they sent us home!

    The next day, same thing, febrile convulsion, couldn't get temp down, took her to hospital again and demanded they did tests otherwise we weren't leaving, they eventually listened, after again saying 'oh it's probably teeth!' They checked her urine and she had a URinary tract infection which had obviously been there for weeks going by the amount of bacteria!!
    The doctors then said, 'gosh lucky we caught it now, we had a baby recently who lost a kidney due to an undiagnosed UTI'

    so I guess the point of this post is to trust your gut, mothers intuition is usually right, and if I had of pushed earlier my poor baby wouldn't have been in so much pain for almost a month!

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    Quote Originally Posted by May baby View Post
    I have her a bath early this afternoon, it was a bad move as her body temp dropped so quickly that she was shivering so bad. Health nurse said it's not good as they go into shock.
    Wow, funny how advice from medical professionals always varies so much. It's what I was always advised to do by the doc at the hospital to try and get the temp below 40.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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