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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Totally agree, was thinking the same thing. Some kids are 'easy' babies no matter what you do. Using SOS on an easy baby doesn't mean SOS worked just that they have an easy baby. Some are the opposite.
    I know you're not saying all SOS babies are easy babies
    - I like to think my good sleeper (ds1) is in some way due to the hard work I put in with establishing his routine, making his bed space comfortable etc. I am pretty sure Myself/SOS played a part because prior to SOS he didn't settle or sleep well and always cried for a feed.

  2. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allie Pallie View Post
    ah no, just to be clear, the baby may have pood after you put it down (it foes happen) maybe the room feels ok to you but your baby either is too warm or cold.

    My point is, there are a lot of things that you need to note, do, be aware of, set up etc, before getting bub into their cot and without doing them, baby is more likely to have an emotional cry than a winge and isn't likely to self settle.

    As I said I'm on my phone and a little time poor, so I don't have time to cover everything else that needs to be done to help the process (my4 points were just examples, not a complete list.) but I'm sure you get my point, whether you admit it or not.
    I'm still unsure of your point? People who don't do sos would go in when baby was upset and see what was wrong?

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  4. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    Vomiting is gross. If I had to go to the drastic measure of making myself vomit just to get my much-adored caregiver to show me some love, well... that's just so wrong.



    A bub may want a cuddle, but if they have plenty of love and care and cuddles and attention in the day, then it is a want, not a need. Every baby needs to sleep.

    My child wants to play at the park all day, but doesn't need to. She may want to eat apples for every meal of every day, but doesn't need to.

    There is a time and a place for everything, but if a bub is purposely throwing up, when they NEED to sleep, because they WANT attention, then sorry, but slew is faaaar more important.

    I'm not expecting people to agree with me, bur this is where I sit.

  5. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I know you're not saying all SOS babies are easy babies
    - I like to think my good sleeper (ds1) is in some way due to the hard work I put in with establishing his routine, making his bed space comfortable etc. I am pretty sure Myself/SOS played a part because prior to SOS he didn't settle or sleep well and always cried for a feed.
    I thought sos was easy and solved your "problems" within a few days?

  6. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Totally agree, was thinking the same thing. Some kids are 'easy' babies no matter what you do. Using SOS on an easy baby doesn't mean SOS worked just that they have an easy baby. Some are the opposite.
    I have had 3 relatively easy babies. My second was my most difficult by far, but he was still a good sleeper by night. He was difficult by day but after 3 months, he was much easier.

    My first could put herself to sleep from 8 weeks of age. I was able to read her tired cues were easy to read and she was a pretty happy baby anyway.

    Lucky my third was the easiest newborn ever and quite easy overall as she was dragged around, woken up, slept anywhere because of 2 older toddlers who needed entertaining. I think it's impossible to implement sos on third child when you've got school run, work etc.

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  8. #206
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    Just leaving opposing parenting philosophies aside for the moment... To those who've read a range of parenting books - do the other books leave this much room for interpretation/misinterpretation, or are they more 'idiot'-proof?

    Because that keeps leaping out to me as the main issue. Not the semantics about whether a cup of tea literally means having a cup of tea or not, but the fact that this distinction is being made in the first place.

    And surely, if this book can be misinterpreted to the extent that even some of SOS's biggest proponents are saying that some people are getting it very wrong, then that's a massive problem?

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  10. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsharvey View Post
    Just leaving opposing parenting philosophies aside for the moment... To those who've read a range of parenting books - do the other books leave this much room for interpretation/misinterpretation, or are they more 'idiot'-proof?

    Because that keeps leaping out to me as the main issue. Not the semantics about whether a cup of tea literally means having a cup of tea or not, but the fact that this distinction is being made in the first place.

    And surely, if this book can be misinterpreted to the extent that even some of SOS's biggest proponents are saying that some people are getting it very wrong, then that's a massive problem?
    Oh, they just didn't read it properly!

    Perhaps the next addition should be simplified and titled "sos for dummies"

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I'm still unsure of your point? People who don't do sos would go in when baby was upset and see what was wrong?



    Haha. You're hilarious!

    am talking about people who use SOS. Why are you talking about those who don't? I'm talking about using it properly (with it without tweaks).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allie Pallie View Post
    Haha. You're hilarious!

    am talking about people who use SOS. Why are you talking about those who don't? I'm talking about using it properly (with it without tweaks).
    Ok, so then they should go in after the time specified, say 20 mins? That should be long enough for tea! Or are they not reading it properly either?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsharvey View Post
    Just leaving opposing parenting philosophies aside for the moment... To those who've read a range of parenting books - do the other books leave this much room for interpretation/misinterpretation, or are they more 'idiot'-proof?
    I'm more geared towards the opposite of this philosophy. I think even within the same family children can be vastly different, with different personalities and needs. I find the ones that have strict routines are the ones that I find most difficulty with. I don't really use any book per say, I just listen to my instincts. So Sears would probably be the 'professional' that speaks to me the most. I don't really put my parenting into a classification. I do use AP, but for some things I don't.

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